Favorite movie fight scenes

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James Y
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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Tue Nov 10, 2020 4:08 pm

Crazy Couple (1979, Hong Kong). Director: Ricky Lau. Action directors: Fung Hak-On & Wong Ha.

Full movie. Note: I posted this much earlier in the thread, but that one was taken off YouTube. Unfortunately, this version doesn’t have the clearest pic quality (but is acceptable), and the sound is about a half-second too early.

Leading man Lau Kar-Yung is a member of the famous Lau Family that includes his famous uncles Lau Kar-Leung and Lau Kar-Wing. It’s interesting to see him again in his old-school comedy kung fu movies, as today he is a respected master and teacher of the Lau Family’s Hung Kuen (AKA, Hung Gar) kung fu, and is serious and no-nonsense. Also posted below is a video of him as he looks in more recent years.

Co-star Dean Shek (the tall, gangly guy) reached the height of his popularity during the comedy kung fu era, after appearing with Jackie Chan in Snake in the Eagle’s Shadow and Drunken Master. This is one of the few such films where he played a protagonist, instead of a minor bully. His rubbery face and apparent awkwardness made him a perfect foil.

Final fight (from 1:16:17): Lau Kar-Yung & Dean Shek vs Fung Hak-On:

https://youtu.be/i1HtZTzS4_w

Here is Lau Kar-Yung more recently:

https://youtu.be/4_7NM89G-YE

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Thu Nov 12, 2020 11:15 am

IMPORTANT! If you choose to watch this from the beginning, you must skip ahead from the opening title a bit on this video, or else the picture will remain stuck on the title.

Note: Although the movie is titled Shadow Ninja here, the REAL title is Killer Wears White, (AKA, The Killer in White). “Shadow Ninja” was a misleading title attached to it by US/international distributors during the 1980s, to cash in on the ‘80s ninja craze. There are no ninjas in this movie.

Killer Wears White (1980, Hong Kong). Director: Joe Cheung. Action directors: Stephen Tung Wai, Lam Ching-Ying & Pan Yung-Sheng.

Full movie. I previously posted one or two of the preliminary fights earlier in this thread, but as far as I knew, the final fight was not available on YouTube at the time. This final fight is one of the more brutal for a movie that earlier incorporates some kung fu comedy. There are also some aspects of the slasher/horror genre. In actuality, this movie has relatively few fight scenes, but the ones it does have are mostly excellent.

Leading man Stephen Tung Wai is most familiar to Western viewers as Bruce Lee’s young pupil in the opening scenes of Enter the Dragon.

Co-star Roy Chiao also appeared (very briefly) in the opening scene of Enter the Dragon, as the Shaolin abbot. He was also Jean-Claude Van Damme’s sensei in the American movie Bloodsport. Roy Chiao actually appeared in over 100 films; he was a dramatic actor, not a screen fighter or martial artist.

Yen Shi-Kwan was in top form here as the wily arch-villain. He also had excellent villain performances in Fearless Hyena, The Master Strikes, and Once Upon a Time in China (all previous postings earlier in this thread), among others. He easily ranked among the top fighting villains of kung fu cinema, alongside Wang Lung-Wei, Hwang Jang-Lee, Philip Ko Fei, Yasuaki Kurata, Kuan Feng, Lu Feng, and a few others.

(From 46:00): Stephen Tung Wai in first casino fight:

(From 55:45): Stephen Tung Wai in second casino fight:

(From 1:01:05): Stephen Tung Wai vs Benz Kong:

(From 1:17:55: Yen Shi-Kwan eliminates Peter Chan Lung:

(From 1:24:38: Final fights: Stephen Tung Wai vs Wong Ha; Stephen Tung Wai & Roy Chiao vs Yen Shi-Kwan:

https://youtu.be/5WZbabatWtI

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby JD Spydo » Thu Nov 12, 2020 5:55 pm

Jim I've been looking at this thread occasionally with some interest. I'm not a big fan of most movies and probably only go to see maybe one or two of them in a year. I haven't even seen a movie since the latest version of Pet Semetary was released in April of 2019 and it was a horrible let down compared to the original 1989 version.

But it is interesting how well choreographed a lot of those fight scenes are on many movies and even a few TV Shows. One TV Show that I always thought had really cool fight scenes was "The Wild, Wild West" starring Robert Conrad>> which is one of my favorite TV shows of all time. That TV Show along with "The Man From U.N.C.L.E." both I thought were way ahead of their time for 1960s TV shows. Now I always thought those two shows had some most interesting fight scenes especially for the limited technology of that era.

Also in light of the fact that we just recently lost Sean Connery ( James Bond fame) I will also say that I thought that some of those 007 movies had interesting fight scenes in those movies as well. Especially "Diamonds Are Forever".

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Fri Nov 13, 2020 10:09 am

JD Spydo wrote:
Thu Nov 12, 2020 5:55 pm
Jim I've been looking at this thread occasionally with some interest. I'm not a big fan of most movies and probably only go to see maybe one or two of them in a year. I haven't even seen a movie since the latest version of Pet Semetary was released in April of 2019 and it was a horrible let down compared to the original 1989 version.

But it is interesting how well choreographed a lot of those fight scenes are on many movies and even a few TV Shows. One TV Show that I always thought had really cool fight scenes was "The Wild, Wild West" starring Robert Conrad>> which is one of my favorite TV shows of all time. That TV Show along with "The Man From U.N.C.L.E." both I thought were way ahead of their time for 1960s TV shows. Now I always thought those two shows had some most interesting fight scenes especially for the limited technology of that era.

Also in light of the fact that we just recently lost Sean Connery ( James Bond fame) I will also say that I thought that some of those 007 movies had interesting fight scenes in those movies as well. Especially "Diamonds Are Forever".

Joe,

I agree that some of the old movies and TV shows had some good fight scenes. The Wild, Wild West was one of my favorites as a kid, but at the time, it was mostly because of the weird devices and such.

Another ‘60s show that had good fights was The Green Hornet, of course, because of Bruce Lee.

My favorite Bond movies to this day are Thunderball and Diamonds Are Forever. And Sean Connery was indeed the best James Bond (IMO). Oddly enough, in his fight scenes, Connery seemed a bit physically awkward and unathletic. I say the same thing about William Shatner as Captain Kirk on Star Trek. Yet the fight scenes themselves had a lot of drama and anxiety to them. Daniel Craig as 007 is the most athletic of the Bond actors, and IMO he is second only to Sean Connery as Bond. But in spite of his superior physical coordination and athleticism, for me, his movies, and even his fight scenes, don’t quite have the same level of edge-of-your-seat suspense that many of Sean Connery’s had, especially in Thunderball.

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Sat Nov 14, 2020 6:56 pm

The City of Violence (2006, South Korea). Director: Ryoo Seung-Wan.

Final fights: Ryoo Seung-Wan & Jung Doo-Hong vs knife-wielding gangsters and Tae Kwon Do kickers:

https://youtu.be/paLDxflDqlM

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby shunsui » Tue Nov 17, 2020 2:36 am

Didn't want to wear out my welcome in the get out your knife thread, so I'll post this here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K3mkYDTRwgw

and the breakdown (some good tips).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEZeb5lKPkk

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Tue Nov 17, 2020 10:01 am

shunsui wrote:
Tue Nov 17, 2020 2:36 am
Didn't want to wear out my welcome in the get out your knife thread, so I'll post this here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K3mkYDTRwgw

and the breakdown (some good tips).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEZeb5lKPkk

Collateral is a good movie. Thanks for posting.

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Fri Nov 20, 2020 7:54 pm

The Street Fighter (1974, Japan). Director: Shigehiro Ozawa.

The movie that made Shinichi “Sonny” Chiba internationally famous, although by the time he starred in The Street Fighter, Chiba had already acted in about 90 movies since 1961. When The Streetfighter was first released in the US, it was reputedly the first movie to be given an ‘X’ rating for violence. One reason was the gore, and most famously, the ‘X-ray punch’ that occurs in the second clip below. This was the very first movie that used that particular cinematic technique. There was another scene that influenced its initial US X-rating could never be posted here. Suffice it to say that it’s very ‘memorable’.

When The Street Fighter was released in the US, a magazine (possibly Penthouse Magazine) published a story with a fake biography of Sonny Chiba, saying he was the son of an American serviceman and a Japanese mother, who was born during the post-WWII occupation. That was total and complete BS. Sonny Chiba is a 100% Japanese actor who was born in 1939, and most definitely was NOT the son of any American serviceman. The bogus life story was invented by American distributors of the movie to make Sonny Chiba seem more palatable to American audiences. In actuality, his father had been a Japanese military test pilot.

Fight scene-wise, Sonny Chiba’s technique was never pretty, but he was extremely intense. So intense, in fact, that he could make Bruce Lee at his most intense appear half-asleep. At times, his intensity, meant to be terrifying, can be unintentionally funny (IMO). His contorted facial expressions and body postures during his fights look like he’s suffering the after-effects of a bad breakfast burrito. Although you definitely would NOT want to be one of the onscreen villains who had to face his wrath. Sonny Chiba’s onscreen enemies got messed up BAD.

Gym fight: Sonny Chiba vs Yakuza gangsters:

https://youtu.be/ssr_uAPmAE0

Sonny Chiba vs Yakuza gangsters; the infamous ‘X-Ray Punch’:

https://youtu.be/AJ0SsQlHTyM

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Wed Nov 25, 2020 10:08 am

Warrior From Shaolin (original title: Carry On Wise Guy; 1980, Hong Kong). Director: Lau Kar-Wing. Action directors: Lau Kar-Wing/the Lau Brothers.

Warrior From Shaolin is a pretty good kung fu film, but not among my favorite Lau Brothers works. This was among the few independent kung fu films by the Lau Brothers (Lau Kar-Leung and Lau Kar-Wing), through their own Lau Brothers (L&B) Film Co. The Lau Brothers were mostly known for their work at Shaw Brothers Studio during the Shaw era. Starring Gordon Liu (Lau Kar-Fai), often mistaken as an adopted brother of Lau Kar-Leung and Lau Kar-Wing; but in actuality, the godson of Lau Cham, the family’s patriarch. The co-stars include Lau Kar-Yung, the Lau Brothers’ nephew. This movie’s fight sequences have the characteristic complexity that the Lau Brothers’ movies were renowned for.

Fight among villains: Lau Kar-Wing & Lily Li vs Fung Hak-On, Chan Dik-Hak, & henchmen:

https://youtu.be/9eccvKOKXWs

For some odd reason, this movie’s final fight is not posted on YouTube, but the fight directly preceding the final fight is. I say “odd reason,” because this was an independent film, and therefore shouldn’t have the licensing issues that posting clips from kung fu films made by the big studios (Shaw Brothers or Golden Harvest) often have. The reason for big studio licensing issues is because the Shaw Brothers film library is licensed to Hong Kong-based Celestial Pictures, and the Golden Harvest film library is licensed to China-based Fortune Star Media. Which is why whole movies or clips taken from those studios’ movies are usually removed from YouTube before too long, except for little clips posted by Celestial or Fortune Star themselves. Independent kung fu films “should” be public domain, but I’m not a lawyer. It just seems strange to me that if the person who uploaded these scenes to YouTube owns a copy of the movie, why he/she chose not to include a clip of the final fight. But I’ll take what I’m given...

“Pre-final fight”: Gordon Liu, Eric Tsang, Lau Kar-Yung & Lin Ke-Ming vs Lau Kar-Wing, Lily Li & henchmen:

https://youtu.be/t_D7Vk9Fupw

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Fri Nov 27, 2020 6:20 pm

Happy 80th Birthday, Bruce Lee!

It’s hard to believe that Bruce Lee would have turned 80 today. He will forever be at 32 years old, the age he died at in 1973.

Here is Bruce at a 1965 Hollywood screen test for a proposed project called ‘Charlie Chan’s No. 1 Son’, which ended up being shelved. A year later, Bruce was cast as Kato in The Green Hornet. As a very young child, I remembered seeing The Green Hornet on TV, but at that age (about 3), it left little impression on me.

Bruce Lee was only 24 years old in this footage. Many people say that Bruce Lee wasn’t a real martial artist. Which shows how much they know. Look at his self-confidence. Look at his speed, his perfect balance, control and precision. Even at a little screen test. Anybody who really knows martial arts should be able to spot these things. And while those things together didn’t make him the best fighter in the world, very few young martial artists, fighters, and even few masters can move with such ease, dexterity and authority. Yes, some things do carry over and are indicators of real ability. In all my years in martial arts, I have seen plenty of fakes and wannabes; I have never seen a martial arts fraud with Bruce’s genuine self-assurance and physical ability. Many people in the world have ‘swagger’, but comparatively few have such total self-confidence like Bruce had.

Bruce trained HARD, but what made him special was pure, natural physical talent; total belief in self; higher than average intellect; and the constant drive to keep growing and improving. Natural physical talent alone, without those other qualities, would have taken him nowhere. His intellect alone was well above many people, then and now, who are much older, let alone your average 24 year old. He was a rare talent indeed. IMO, Bruce Lee the man was much more fascinating than Bruce Lee the movie star.

https://youtu.be/k2BKNDc48N4

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Mon Nov 30, 2020 9:42 am

Lau Brothers Kung Fu theatrical promo film (circa 1979).

Note: The name Liu Chia-Liang is the mandarin pronunciation and spelling of Lau Kar-Leung.

This rare short film was a theatrical promo film, likely played with trailers, featuring demonstrations by the Lau Family, and directed by brothers Lau Kar-Leung and Lau Kar-Wing. Featuring Lau Kar-Leung, Lau Kar-Wing, Gordon Liu (AKA, Lau Kar-Fai), and Lau Kar-Yung (nephew of Lau Kar-Leung and Lau Kar-Wing).

Some may not recognize Gordon Liu, because he has hair here. He was most recognizable for playing bald Shaolin monk characters.

In the first demo, Gordon Liu (from 0:07), Lau Kar-Wing (from 0:44), and Lau Kar-Leung (from 1:09) alternate demonstrating different sections of the same form. The form is from the Hung Kuen (AKA, Hung Gar) system; the name of the form is Fu Hok Seung Ying Kuen (Tiger and Crane double/combined form). For time constraints and for entertainment’s sake, they are performing it much faster than you would normally see a Hung Kuen practitioner doing the form.

The Monkey style (Cantonese: Hau Kuen; Mandarin: Hou Quan) was likely demo’d to promote Lau Kar-Leung’s 1979 movie, Mad Monkey Kung Fu (posted earlier in this thread). This part features Lau Kar-Yung and Lau Kar-Leung (beginning at 2:08).

There is a fight scene featuring Lau Kar-Leung vs multiple opponents, including his brother, Lau Kar-Wing (from 3:32):

https://youtu.be/8q7ekwHl1ZA

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Fri Dec 04, 2020 12:32 pm

The Fearless Duo (1979, Hong Kong). Directors: Joseph Kuo & Fang Hsiang. Action director: Ho Chi-Wai.

Full movie.

I first saw this movie about 40 years ago. It was also the first time I ever saw Lau Kar-Yung or Hwang Jang-Lee onscreen.

Co-stars include Yuen Chu and Yuen Qiu (who play younger and older sisters, respectively).

Yuen Qiu (the ‘older sister’) is probably best-known for her role as ‘The Landlady’ in the 2004 film Kung Fu Hustle. But fewer people realize she also had a small role in the 1974 James Bond movie, The Man With the Golden Gun, as one of two young female martial arts experts who help Roger Moore/007 fight off a group of karate school lackeys. She was originally trained in Peking Opera. This movie showcased perhaps her longest and most involved fight scenes.

Today, Lau Kar-Yung is a legitimate master and international teacher of Hung Kuen kung fu. Now in his mid-60s, he is one of the relatively few old-school kung fu movie stars who are still actively promoting real-life martial arts to this day. It’s a bit surreal watching him doing comedy kung fu, as he did in this movie, especially some of his facial expressions during his final fight against Hwang Jang-Lee, and contrasting those with footage of him as a straight-laced master today (also posted below the movie video).

As was often the case, when real-life Korean Tae Kwon Do master Hwang Jang-Lee’s villain character is ultimately defeated by the heroes, it isn’t really convincing. That’s how physically dominant he was as an onscreen villain. Not only was Hwang renowned as the greatest kicker in martial arts cinema, he was unique in that he never believed in, nor ever practiced, leg stretching exercises for flexibility, because he believed that static stretching is harmful. He was the only superkicker who couldn’t do a split. He simply rolled his hips, shook out his body, and he was ready to go. His method worked for him; now in his mid-70s, Hwang is still an awesome kicker. Last I heard, he still teaches Tae Kwon Do/Tang Soo Do in Seoul, Korea.

This movie is literally chock full of fight scenes. I have only highlighted a few.

(From 42:44); Lau Kar-Yung & Yuen Qiu vs Chan Lau & To Wai-Woo:

(Final fight, part 1 (from 1:18:18); Yuen Qiu & Yuen Chu vs To Wai-Woo, Ho Kei-Cheong, Chan Ming-Wai & Ho Chi-Wai:

Final fight, part 2 (from 1:22:00); Yuen Qiu & Yuen Chu vs hooked sword fighters (Chan Ming-Wai & Ho Chi-Wai); Lau Kar-Yung & Yuen Chu vs Hwang Jang-Lee:

https://youtu.be/nDTheGSJx1Q

Recent forms demonstrations by Lau Kar-Yung:

https://youtu.be/8l4T05F_9z0

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Mon Dec 07, 2020 11:57 am

The Man With the Golden Gun (1974, US and UK). Director: Guy Hamilton.

In the last post, I mentioned that Hong Kong martial arts actress Yuen Qiu had appeared briefly alongside Roger Moore in the James Bond movie, The Man With the Golden Gun. Here it is. She is one of the two girls in schoolgirl uniforms who helps 007 fight the karate school lackeys. In reality, Yuen Qiu was well beyond schoolgirl age; she was 23 or 24 when this scene was shot.

Assisting 007, and playing the girls’ uncle, is the late Korean-American actor Soon-Tek Oh, who appeared in numerous American TV shows and movies, from the 1970s into the 2000s.

Also in the scene are Charlie Chan Yiu-Lam (the head karate student in the black uniform). He would later appear in many classic kung fu films, including Snake in the Eagle’s Shadow (with Jackie Chan); Secret Rivals 2 (With John Liu & Hwang Jang-Lee); Death Duel of Kung Fu (with Wong Tao & John Liu); Martial Arts (with Chan Wai-Man); Duel of the 7 Tigers (with Cliff Lok & Philip Ko Fei); Legend of a Fighter (with Leung Kar-Yan); and The Cheeky Chap (with Wei Pai), to name only a few.

The goofy-looking stuntman who is beaten up by the two girls and Roger Moore is Chin Yuet-Sang, a veteran stuntman and actor/performer/choreographer in countless Hong Kong films.

Yen Shi-Kwan, who would later become one of Hong Kong cinema’s top kung fu fighting villains in movies like Fearless Hyena, Killer Wears White, The Master Strikes, and Once Upon a Time in China, is glimpsed briefly as one of the lackeys/extras running out of the dojo and pursuing Roger Moore to the river.

This scene was obviously included in the movie to cash in on the then-still ongoing ‘kung fu/Bruce Lee movie craze’.

(From 3:30); Roger Moore vs Charlie Chan Yiu-Lam:

(From 5:00); Yuen Qiu, Joie Vejjajiva, Soon-Tek Oh & Roger Moore vs Chin Yuet-Sang & other lackeys:

https://youtu.be/PoENMzywGGM

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby OrangeShoes » Tue Dec 08, 2020 2:16 am

I am hooked with the martial arts - fight scenes in the IP Man movies starring Donnie Yen. He is good!

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Tue Dec 08, 2020 4:48 pm

OrangeShoes wrote:
Tue Dec 08, 2020 2:16 am
I am hooked with the martial arts - fight scenes in the IP Man movies starring Donnie Yen. He is good!

Yes, he is! :)

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Tue Dec 08, 2020 4:58 pm

Dragon’s Claws (1979, Hong Kong). Director: Joseph Kuo. Action director: Max Lee.

This movie has the same director, the same leading man and arch-villain, and a few more of the same actors as The Fearless Duo. As a movie, I like The Fearless Duo more; but in this film, Lau Kar-Yung’s character is more of an even match for Hwang Jang-Lee.

The language is Cantonese with no English subtitles, but it really doesn’t matter.

Final fight; Lau Kar-Yung vs Hwang Jang-Lee:

https://youtu.be/Dcnz_3yxZSY

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Wed Dec 09, 2020 9:37 pm

Dragon Fist (1979; filmed in Taiwan & South Korea). Director: Lo Wei. Action director: Jackie Chan.

IMO, Dragon Fist was one of Jackie Chan’s best movies. It is highly underrated. It’s one of the few post-1978 Jackie Chan films that wasn’t a comedy. I consider Jackie Chan to have been at his physical and creative peak at that time, when he was still doing period kung fu films, with extremely difficult and complex choreography. This was the period BEFORE Jackie Chan began focusing on modern-style kickboxing fighting and Buster Keaton-inspired stunts in the 1980s.

Nora Miao also co-stars in this movie; she appears briefly in the final fight clip, in a non-fighting role. She was most famous as Bruce Lee’s female co-star/love interest in Fist of Fury and Way of the Dragon.

The final fight clip is in Cantonese language without subtitles. The fighting starts, stops, then picks up again, as in my highlighted descriptions. The clips I’m posting are the best and clearest I could find from this film on YouTube.

Yen Shi-Kwan’s role is unusual, as he goes from being a villain to one of the protagonists.

Yen Shi-Kwan vs Hsu Hsia:

https://youtu.be/tpb-ytUAeIE

Jackie Chan vs James Tien:

https://youtu.be/KEfDi7XH-O8

Final fights, part 1 (from 2:30): Jackie Chan vs James Tien & Han Ying; Jackie Chan vs Yen Shi-Kwan, Han Ying & Pearl Lin:

Final fights, part 2 (from 10:40); Jackie Chan vs Wang Kuang-Yu; Yen Shi-Kwan, Han Ying & Pearl Lin vs James Tien; Jackie Chan vs Chui Fat; Jackie Chan vs Kao Chiang:

https://youtu.be/XRsB9YcSEEA

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Wed Dec 16, 2020 10:19 am

The Rebel Intruders (1980, Hong Kong). Director: Chang Cheh. Action directors: Kuo Chui, Lu Feng & Chiang Sheng.

These are the only two fight scenes from this movie I could find on YouTube. The finale, and the fight leading up to it, are not available on YT.

Original ‘Venom Mob’ member Kuo Chui (AKA, Phillip Kwok) briefly appeared as ‘General Chang’ in the 1997 James Bond film, Tomorrow Never Dies, starring Pierce Brosnan. IIRC, he also choreographed Michelle Yeoh’s fight scenes in that movie as well. Kuo Chui was also the choreographer of the fight scenes in the 2001 French action/horror movie, Brotherhood of the Wolf.

Lo Meng is still active onscreen, most recently in Ip Man 2, Ip Man 3, and Ip Man 4: The Finale, mostly as comic relief, as the kung fu master who loses his fights, then makes silly excuses.

Both of these scenes are in Mandarin language with no English subtitles.

Casino fight scene: Featuring Kuo Chui (gray and black outfit; Chiang Sheng (gray and white outfit; and Lo Meng (brown outfit):

https://youtu.be/b4b4A0_9sBY

Ambush fight: Sun Chien vs Yang Hsiung; Kuo Chui vs Sun Chien; Chiang Sheng & Lo Meng vs henchmen:

https://youtu.be/Sc1vqjWM08c

Jim
Last edited by James Y on Thu Dec 17, 2020 7:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby p_atrick » Wed Dec 16, 2020 11:38 am

Not sure if anybody had mentioned this movie (too lazy to read through all the pages), but the Raid: Redemption is basically one giant fight scene. It's a fun movie.

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Wed Dec 16, 2020 11:47 am

p_atrick wrote:
Wed Dec 16, 2020 11:38 am
Not sure if anybody had mentioned this movie (too lazy to read through all the pages), but the Raid: Redemption is basically one giant fight scene. It's a fun movie.

Thanks!

Yes, I posted scenes from that, and also from The Raid 2: Berandal, which IMO, is even better than part 1.

Jim


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