Favorite movie fight scenes

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Sat Jun 06, 2020 10:26 am

The Tale of Zatoichi (1962, Japan). Director: Kenji Misumi.

This was the first movie in the Zatoichi series. The reason that Zatoichi is my favorite movie character is not for the fight scenes in the movies, but for the storylines, and for the depth of his humanity. IMO, that’s what sets him apart from all other action movie characters (although his movies are actually more dramas than action films).

Sword duel: Zatoichi (Shintaro Katsu) vs Miki Hirate (Shigeru Amachi):

https://youtu.be/Q8bBkGCmfdo

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Sat Jun 06, 2020 8:19 pm

Of Cooks and Kung Fu (1979, Taiwan). Director: Ting Chung. Action director: Chen Shao-Lung.

This was the first Taiwan movie appearance of Chang Shan, who played the arch-villain. Chang Shan is an ethnic Chinese who was born in South Korea. Three years later, he would play his most famous villain role in Shaolin vs Lama (which was an earlier entry on page 7 of this thread).

Caveat: This final fight was nicely choreographed and shot, but it’s quite long for a one-on-one fight scene. However, it’s not the longest. That honor probably goes to The Young Master, starring Jackie Chan (an entry on page 1 of this thread).

Final fight: Chen Shao-Lung vs Chang Shan:

https://youtu.be/INaRZU7gjXk

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Thu Jun 11, 2020 8:35 pm

Sleeping Fist (1978, Taiwan). Director: Teddy Yip Wing-Cho. Action directors: Wong Ha & Chih I-Hsiung.

*Full movie.

One of the many kung fu comedies from the late ‘70s featuring made-up styles (in this case, Sleeping Fist), on the heels of the popularity of Drunken Master, which starred Jackie Chan. I miss the spirit of fun of these kung fu movies of the 1970s and 80s from Taiwan and Hong Kong. The few Chinese kung fu films that are still being made today (which are all from Mainland China) all take themselves way too seriously and lack that fun creativity of movies like these.

Leading man Leung Kar-Yan was perfect for his role.

The kid acrobat is Huang I-Lung (Cantonese: Wong Yat-Lung), who appeared in several kung fu movies. He was either a young Peking/Beijing opera trainee, or was trained strictly as an acrobat.

The old man was Yuen Siu-Tin (AKA, Simon Yuen), a veteran actor and the patriarch of the Yuen Clan; his most famous son is Yuen Woo-Ping, who directed and choreographed countless films, and action-directed The Matrix trilogy movies.

Eddy Ko Hung is the arch-villain. He and Leung Kar-Yan also fought each other in Thundering Mantis, an earlier entry on page 11 of this thread.

Final fight (from 1:13:20); Yuen Siu-Tin vs Ching Kuo-Chung, Weng Hsiao-Hu & Eddy Ko Hung; Leung Kar-Yan and Huang I-Lung vs Eddy Ko Hung:

https://youtu.be/uBp__qQ1Jz8

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Fri Jun 12, 2020 8:31 pm

The Best of Lone Wolf and Cub.

This is a montage of snippets of fight scenes taken from the six Lone Wolf and Cub movies:

1) Lone Wolf and Cub: Sword of Vengeance (1972, Japan). Director: Kenji Misumi.
2) Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart at the River Styx (1972, Japan). Director: Kenji Misumi.
3) Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart to Hades (1972, Japan). Director: Kenji Misumi.
4) Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart in Peril (1972, Japan). Director: Buichi Saito.
5) Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart in the Land of Demons (1973, Japan). Director: Kenji Misumi.
6) Lone Wolf and Cub: White Heaven in Hell (1974, Japan). Director: Yoshiyuki Kuroda.

Unfortunately, fight scenes from the movies, and the movies themselves, are not readily available on YouTube, whether due to licensing issues, or because of the gore. These movies were live-action adaptations of the Japanese Manga (comic) Lone Wolf and Cub. The action is at once more cartoonish, and more graphic and gory, than typical chanbara/samurai films of the time.

The title character, Ogami Itto, is a former executioner for a shogun who is falsely accused by his own clan and becomes a wandering assassin, along with his young son, seeking revenge for his murdered wife. Ogami Itto was played by Tomisaburo Wakayama, who in real life was the older brother of iconic Zatoichi star Shintaro Katsu. However, compared to Zatoichi, Ogami Itto was a far more menacing presence, and a stone cold killer. Unlike most other old-school chanbara actors, Wakayama was a real-life martial arts expert, who held a 4th dan in Judo, as well as having trained in Iaido, Kenjutsu, Kendo and Bojutsu.

https://youtu.be/wz0u4OehGds

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Sun Jun 14, 2020 8:07 pm

Way of the Dragon (1972, Hong Kong; filmed in Hong Kong and Italy). Director and action director: Bruce Lee.

I already posted the Bruce Lee/Chuck Norris fight this movie is famous for on page 3 of this thread. This fight scene, in which Bruce Lee takes on Bob Wall and Hwang In-Shik, was a great showcase of Bruce Lee’s amazing speed. There was no undercranking (speeding up) of the action.

Bob Wall was one of Chuck Norris’s real-life students, and he played his student in this film. He had outstanding reaction timing, which made him a perfect foil for Bruce Lee. He also played O’Hara in Enter the Dragon.

Korean Hapkido master Hwang In-Shik (sometimes written as Wong Ing-Sik) gets squashed by Bruce Lee here, but in reality, he was probably the physically quickest martial artist that Bruce ever fought onscreen. Like Bruce Lee, Hwang In-Shik was often too fast for Hong Kong stuntmen to react to, and sometimes had to slow his movements down so they could react properly. However, he still wasn’t as fast as Bruce. Years later, he was able to showcase his speed and technique much better against Jackie Chan, in The Young Master (see page 1 of this thread), and again in Dragon Lord (see page 15 of this thread).

Way of the Dragon is my favorite Bruce Lee movie, because it was directed by him, so he was able to showcase more skills, and also incorporated some humor into it. His character was also the most likable of his four completed martial arts movies. Interestingly, Bruce Lee originally intended the movie for Hong Kong audiences only, and never expected it to be seen in the West, especially in the US. Its first general release in the US was in 1974, two years after its Hong Kong/Asian release, and one year after Bruce Lee’s death, and was retitled Return of the Dragon.

Bob Wall vs Chen Fu-Ching & Unicorn Chan; Hwang In-Shik vs Tony Liu Yung (AKA, Anthony Lau Wing) & Unicorn Chan; Bruce Lee vs Bob Wall & Hwang In-Shik:

https://youtu.be/xjP7NnsMfmo

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Tue Jun 16, 2020 10:23 pm

Showdown at the Cotton Mill (1978, Taiwan). Director: Wu Ma. Action director: Chang Peng.

This is one of the few films where Tan Tao-Liang played a villain. Here, he plays a ‘northern kick’ villain against a ‘southern fist’ hero (played by Chi Kuan-Chun). This is considered a rare film, and it’s the only film that they appeared in together.

In real life, Tan Tao-Liang was (and still is) a high-level Tae Kwon Do master; an ethnic Shandong Chinese who grew up in South Korea, then settled in Taiwan. He was one of cinema’s most famous kickers in the ‘70s, and is also the man who was responsible for teaching fellow kung fu film star John Liu his flexibility and kicking abilities. In the ‘80s, Tan retired from films and moved to Los Angeles, where he operated a large and highly successful Tae Kwon Do school in Monterey Park for many years, before eventually moving back to Taiwan. His famous American students included Jonathan Ke Quan (child actor in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, and The Goonies), and Shannon Lee (daughter of Bruce Lee, who studied under Tan for a short time).

Although Tan Tao-Liang was a great martial arts performer, as an actor he had a wooden personality and limited expressiveness, which, in this case, probably enhanced his role as a cold-blooded villain.

Chi Kuan-Chun is a legitimate Hung Gar kung fu master, originally from Hong Kong, but who long ago settled in Taiwan. Now in his early 70s, Chi Kuan-Chun is still in great shape, and has aged amazingly well; far better than the majority of martial arts and action stars of his generation.

Tan Tao-Liang and Chi Kuan-Chun have each been featured in earlier posts in this thread.

Final fight: Chi Kuan-Chun vs Tan Tao-Liang:

https://youtu.be/0SUpLPnyYuo

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Wed Jun 17, 2020 8:14 pm

The Sword of Doom (1966, Japan). Director: Kihachi Okamoto.

In this movie, the main character is not only a master swordsman, but is also an evil man with no redeeming qualities, who eventually descends deeper and deeper into insanity. Although it’s not evident in this particular scene, The Sword of Doom was a very bloody movie for the time period. Originally, it was supposed to have a sequel, which was scrapped, because some felt it would have been “too violent and bloody.” Regardless, “The Sword of Doom” stands out as one of the great classics of the samurai/chanbara genre.

Forest fight: Tatsuya Nakadai vs revenge-seeking samurai clan:

https://youtu.be/4LAk4hRNhVg

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby VashHash » Thu Jun 18, 2020 8:13 am

I like that you're still keeping this thread going James. What a vast collection of fight scenes.

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Thu Jun 18, 2020 3:39 pm

VashHash wrote:
Thu Jun 18, 2020 8:13 am
I like that you're still keeping this thread going James. What a vast collection of fight scenes.
Many thanks, VashHash. I’m glad that you are enjoying them.

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Thu Jun 18, 2020 3:56 pm

Secret Service of the Imperial Court (1984, Hong Kong). Director: Lu Chun-Ku. Action directors: Lu Chun-Ku & Tong Gwok-Gei.

This was among the last movies produced by Hong Kong’s Shaw Brothers Studios, and during this latter period, more ‘wire work’ and more over-the-top choreography was being incorporated in their kung fu and wuxia genre films than in peak-era productions.

Tony Liu Yung (AKA Lau Wing), who plays the eunuch/arch-villain, was the only actor that appeared in all four of Bruce Lee’s completed martial arts films, and is familiar to fans of Enter the Dragon as John Saxon’s tournament opponent. He later went on to star in many films as leading men, and also as villains. IMO, he was more suited to playing villains.

Final fight: Leung Kar-Yan vs Tony Liu Yung:

https://youtu.be/VnloQpTqaus

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Fri Jun 19, 2020 8:43 am

The Challenger (1979, Hong Kong). Director: Eric Tsang. Action directors: Chih I-Hsiung & Wong Ha.

This movie has the same director, and the same main actors, as The Loot (see page 20 of this thread).

Final fight; Norman Chu & David Chiang (with Lily Li) vs Philip Ko Fei:

https://youtu.be/hxESTbipt5Y

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Mon Jun 22, 2020 5:37 pm

Ghosts Galore (1983, Hong Kong). Director: Hsu Hsia. Action directors: Hsu Hsia, Yeung Wah, Chu Ko, & Yuen Fai.

*Full movie.

Ghosts Galore was part of the popular trend of supernatural comedy/magical/horror/kung fu films in Hong Kong cinema that started with movies like Encounters of the Spooky Kind (1980), and The Miracle Fighters (1982), scenes from both of which were posted earlier in this thread.

For some reason, the picture in this video presentation of the film is darker than the actual movie itself, but you can still see the action. Possibly it was darkened as a way around licensing issues; vids of Shaw Brothers Studios movies, especially subtitled versions, tend to get yanked off youtube, especially if the picture is pristine. The 1980s pre-CGI special effects still have a certain charm to them. IMO, some of the overdone comedy between the two leads (Chin Siu-Ho and Cheung Kam) may become grating at times. Ghosts Galore was one of only two films for Shaw Brothers Studios that Korean martial artist Hwang Jang-Lee appeared in (the other was Kid From Kwangtung, an entry on the previous page of this thread).

The final battle is between two wizards, played by Lo Lieh (Chinese wizard) and his apprentices (Chin Siu-Ho and Cheung Kam), and Hwang Jang-Lee (Japanese wizard) and his minions, and has a mixture of magic and physical fighting. This final scene has very much of a Peking (Beijing) or Cantonese Opera style to it.

Final fight (starting from 1:20:50); Lo Lieh vs Hwang Jang-Lee; Chin Siu-Ho & Cheung Kam vs Japanese fighters (Chin Kar-Lok, Yee Tin-Hung & Yuen Fai): Hwang Jang-Lee vs Chin Siu-Ho & Cheung Kam:

https://youtu.be/Z2XxFU2bqLs

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Tue Jun 23, 2020 6:36 pm

Ninja in the Dragon’s Den (1982, Hong Kong; filmed in Taiwan). Director: Corey Yuen. Action directors: Meng Hoi & Corey Yuen.

This movie was a first in several respects. It was screen fighter/stuntman/choreographer Corey Yuen’s directorial debut. Later, Corey Yuen would become an international director and choreographer, playing a big role in boosting the careers of Jean-Claude Van Damme and Jason Statham into superstardom, as only two examples. Ninja in the Dragon’s Den is an uneven movie, with deadly serious scenes followed by goofball antics. I don’t care for the English dubbed version, but this was the clearest version of these final scenes I could find on YouTube. One bit of the dubbed dialogue at the very end is probably pushing the limits of good taste here, one reason I’ve hesitated to post these scenes at all earlier.

Although considered a Hong Kong film, this was actually a co-production between Hong Kong’s Seasonal Films and Japan’s Toei Film Company.

This was the screen debut of Conan Lee (Cantonese: Lee Yuen-Ba). Born in Hong Kong, he was adopted by a white American couple and raised as Lloyd Hutchinson in Queens, New York. Considering this was his very first movie, Conan Lee did an excellent job. Although he later starred or appeared in several other movies, IMO, he never equaled this performance.

This was the first crossover into Hong Kong/Chinese movies for co-star Hiroyuki Sanada. Sanada was responsible for much of this film’s success; he was already an extremely popular teen idol, not only in Japan, but all over Asia, including Hong Kong and Taiwan. He was a protege of action star Sonny Chiba, and a member of Chiba’s Japan Action Club. Sanada later transcended the action movie genre, and now is considered one of Japan’s best dramatic actors. In the late ‘90s, he starred in the original Japanese horror movie Ringu, which Hollywood remade into The Ring. Western audiences probably remember him beating up Tom Cruise in The Last Samurai, and he appeared in Avengers: Endgame. He also played in several American TV series, such as Lost, Helix, Westworld, etc. As is evident in this film, in his prime, Hiroyuki Sanada was a fantastic athlete and martial artist, known for doing his own stunts. His screen fighting is still fantastic today (on the occasions he does screen fight), just minus the acrobatic stunts.

During the finale, the style used by Hwang Jang-Lee and his men, played by Li Hai-Hsing (acrobat with invincibility kung fu) and Yukio Someno (Buddhist monk) is Shen Da, or “Spiritual Boxing,” also described in The Dragon, The Hero, posted on page 20 of this thread.

Ninja fight: Hiroyuki Sanada vs Kwon Yung-Moon & ninjas (from 2:35):
Hiroyuki Sanada vs Hiroshi Tanaka (from 7:25):
Pagoda fight: Conan Lee vs Hiroyuki Sanada (from 12:10):
Final fight: Hiroyuki Sanada & Conan Lee vs Hwang Jang-Lee & his men {Li Hai-Hsing & Yukio Someno} (from 23:12):

https://youtu.be/i89SVHApoiY

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Fri Jun 26, 2020 11:14 am

Come Drink With Me (1966, Hong Kong). Director: King Hu. Action director: Han Ying-Chieh.

This movie is a classic of the wuxia (martial hero/swordsman/swordswoman) genre. In Chinese/Hong Kong cinema, female lead protagonists were the norm in wuxia films; unlike in the West, where lead heroines took longer to catch on. And even today, though established in Hollywood films, the concept of female heroes is still treated as something of a novelty. Wuxia films featuring female leads have been around since the genre began in 1929.

During the 1960s, Cheng Pei-Pei was the undisputed superstar of the genre. In fact, her star peaked and declined prior to Bruce Lee’s rise to superstardom in 1971. After her time at Shaw Brothers Studios, she eventually married in 1971, moved to Los Angeles, and taught dance (she was trained in ballet). During that time, she briefly studied Tang Soo Do under Chuck Norris, who ran a school in L.A. at the time. She appeared in a few films in Hong Kong and Taiwan during this period. She returned to Hong Kong permanently in 1992. Cheng Pei-Pei is probably most familiar to international audiences as the arch-villainess of Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.

In the scene below, many of the henchmen of the villain (played by Chen Hung-Lieh) are familiar faces to fans of old-school kung fu and wuxia films, including Han Ying-Chieh (also the fight choreographer), Feng Yi, Li Yun-Chung, Yuen Siu-Tin (patriarch of the Yuen clan), Ku Feng, Chao Hsiung, Tung Tsui-Pao, etc. The beggar who is her secret helper in the scene was played by Yueh Hua.

Although many might consider the fighting to be crude by later standards, keep in mind the time period of Hong Kong movies this is from, and that Cheng Pei-Pei came from a ballet background, not a martial arts background. Nevertheless, she possessed amazing screen presence and charisma, which made her convincing onscreen

Temple fight scene: Cheng Pei-Pei vs Chen Hung-Lieh & his men:

https://youtu.be/lCZGjT75ni0

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Sat Jun 27, 2020 12:25 pm

The Hot, The Cool, and the Vicious (1976, Taiwan). Director: Lee Tso-Nam. Action director: Tommy Lee (AKA, Lee Gam-Ming).

This clip is a compilation of the most important fight scenes from this movie. This is another movie that features a “southern fist” practitioner (Wong Tao), teaming with a “northern leg/kick” practitioner (Tan Tao-Liang), against a common enemy (Tommy Lee), who can defeat either of them in a one-on-one fight.

The bearded older bad guy wearing brown is George Wang, who in real life was the father of co-star Wong Tao (AKA Don Wong). George Wang acted in Taiwan movies in the 1950s, then relocated to Italy, where he appeared in many Italian movies, especially spaghetti westerns. In the mid-1970s, he moved back to Taiwan and, with his son Wong Tao, started a film company together. Note: To avoid confusion (or maybe add to it), ‘Wong’ is often used interchangeably with ‘Wang.’ ‘Wong’ is the Cantonese-to-English spelling of the surname Wang, as well as the (different) surname Huang (which are the Mandarin spellings of those surnames). ‘Wong Tao‘ is also often written as ‘Wang Tao.’ They are both pronounced ‘Wahng’ or ‘Wong’. The English spellings of Chinese names aren’t so important, because the Chinese characters are what represent the names.

The arch-villain with the golden hair, played by Tommy Lee (Lee Gam-Ming; not the Motley Crue drummer) has an echoing voice. That is supposed to represent his character’s high level of “chi” (also written “qi” or “ki”) development, or ‘internal power.’

From 0:00: Tan Tao-Liang vs henchmen and Wong Tao (also featuring George Wang):
From 4:30: Tommy Lee vs Wong Tao:
From 5:54: Tommy Lee vs Tan Tao-Liang:
From 8:00: Final fight; Wong Tao & Tan Tao-Liang vs Tommy Lee:

https://youtu.be/ocqi987mnKw

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby Mad Mac » Sat Jun 27, 2020 7:41 pm

Die Hard: With a Vengeance (1995) - Suspicious Cops Scene
An unarmed Bruce Willis overpowers four armed men in an elevator.
Talk about close quarters combat.
https://youtu.be/Q0yQbpoQ0hY
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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Sun Jun 28, 2020 5:37 pm

Mad Mac wrote:
Sat Jun 27, 2020 7:41 pm
Die Hard: With a Vengeance (1995) - Suspicious Cops Scene
An unarmed Bruce Willis overpowers four armed men in an elevator.
Talk about close quarters combat.
https://youtu.be/Q0yQbpoQ0hY
Thanks for posting, Mad Mac!

Jim

*Edited for spelling. :o
Last edited by James Y on Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:20 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Sun Jun 28, 2020 6:13 pm

The Raid: Redemption (2011, Indonesia). Director: Gareth Evans. Action directors: Iko Uwais & Yayan Ruhian.

The elevator scene posted above by Mad Mac brought to mind the elevator scene in this movie. I posted the final fight from part 2 of this movie (The Raid: Berandal) earlier in this thread.

Leading man Iko Uwais and Yayan Ruhian (who plays the main fighting villain, ‘Mad Dog’), are both long-time practitioners of the Indonesian martial art of Pencak Silat, or simply, Silat.

IMO, Iko Uwais is the best ‘new-school’ international martial arts/action star today. Ironically, the fight choreography in his Indonesian films resembled a more brutal version of 1980s-era Hong Kong action choreography. Iko was discovered by Welsh director Gareth Evans, who directed and wrote the screenplays for Iko’s first three movies. Evans had as much to do with the success of Iko’s early films as Iko and his stunt team did. Unfortunately, Iko Uwais and Gareth Evans decided not to do a third installment of The Raid movies, and ended up going their separate ways. Since then, Iko Uwais has made appearances in a few major Hollywood movies, but IMO, it will be difficult for him to reach the heights of stardom he could have (I hope I’m wrong here). Perhaps the offers to work in Hollywood were too great for Iko to resist. Evans also moved from Jakarta back to Wales. But when Iko worked with Evans, they created magic. I cannot envision any other director who could create movies that showcases the talents and bring out the best of Iko Uwais like Gareth Evans did.

The majority of The Raid: Redemption takes place in a semi-darkened, decrepit apartment building. The mood is almost as much like a horror film as an action film.

The final two-on-one fight is reminiscent of (and clearly inspired by) the final fights common in Hong Kong and Taiwanese kung fu films of the 1970s and early ‘80s, where the two good guys must double-team to defeat a villain who is too powerful to be beaten by either single-handedly.

Elevator knife scene: Donny Alamsyan vs fellow thugs:

https://youtu.be/YXC7EmmUpkk

Hallway knife fight: Iko Uwais & Tegar Satrya vs thugs:

https://youtu.be/5xxTK0YCm94

Final fight: Iko Uwais & Donny Alamsyan vs “Mad Dog” (Yayan Ruhian):

https://youtu.be/o8EzhqwAAFE

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Wed Jul 01, 2020 2:10 pm

The Raid 2: Berendal (2014, Indonesia). Director: Gareth Evans. Action choreographer: Gareth Evans. Fight choreographer: Iko Uwais.

I already posted the main final fight on page 3 of this thread, which IMO, features the best karambit knife fight scene in cinematic history. I should have posted these fight scenes earlier, too.

The Raid 2: Berandal is one of those rare movie sequels that surpasses the original. Off the top of my head, it is the best post-2K martial arts or action film from any country, also far surpassing anything that Donnie Yen has put out.

Fight scenes: Hammer Girl (Julie Estelle) and Baseball Bat Man (Very Tri Yulisman) vs rival gangsters:

https://youtu.be/alADc_JX96A

Car chase & car fight scene: Rama (Iko Uwais) & Oka Antara vs thugs in cars:

https://youtu.be/orNKptscG0A

Rama (Iko Uwais) vs Hammer Girl (Julie Estelle) & Baseball Bat Man (Very Tri Yulisman):

https://youtu.be/hi9w6knb5Mc

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Fri Jul 03, 2020 9:22 am

Snake Deadly Act (1980, Hong Kong). Director & action director: Wilson Tong.

*Full movie.

This was the only starring role for the young leading man, Ng Kwan-Lung; besides this movie, he appeared in only one other, as an extra. Director Wilson Tong (Tong Wai-Shing) discovered Ng, and was impressed enough by his martial arts skills to offer him the lead role in this film. Ng Kwan-Lung did a great job, but ultimately decided he didn’t want to pursue a movie career any further, and declined to make any more films. That Ng Kwan-Lung had a natural talent for performing onscreen is obvious. Not everybody can look good or natural (or even decent) onscreen. It has little to do with having ‘movie star looks’, and more to do with having a natural flair for performing, a certain degree of charisma, and the ability to follow directions. There are many famous, real-life professional martial arts experts and champion fighters who have looked unimpressive or downright terrible in movies.

Snake Deadly Act is about two evil men (Wilson Tong and Fung Hak-On) who are lifelong enemies, and after losing a fight between the two, one of the men (Fung Hak-On) vows to return and kill the other and his entire family one day. Years later, he secretly becomes the kung fu master of the other man’s son (Ng Kwan-Lung), who has no idea of his father’s evil ways, and essentially trains the young man to kill his own father.

Several music tracks were ‘borrowed’ from the 1967 western movie ‘Hour of the Gun‘ and used throughout the movie.

Opening fight scene (from 0:14); Wilson Tong vs Fung Hak-On:
Brothel fight scene (from 18:06); Ng Kwan-Lung & Fung Hak-On vs Angela Mao Ying:
Casino fight scene (from 43:17); Ng Kwan-Lung & Fung Hak-On vs Chan Wai-Man:
Final fight (from 1:20:20); Ng Kwan-Lung & Fung Hak-On vs Wilson Tong; Ng Kwan-Lung vs Fung Hak-On:

https://youtu.be/Vk2kGl_L7mE

Jim


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