Favorite movie fight scenes

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Mon Feb 08, 2021 9:31 pm

Close Escape (1989, Hong Kong). Director: Chow Jan-Wing. Action director: Kuo Chui.

Action director Kuo Chui was one of the original “Venom Mob”, and is best known as “The Lizard” in The Five Deadly Venoms.

Japanese actress Yukari Oshima was one of the top female action stars in Hong Kong cinema in the late ‘80s through the early ‘90s. She was a black belt in Goju-ryu karate under a Sensei Miki, and was trained for film work when she joined Sonny Chiba’s Japan Action Club.

Dick Wei, the lead villain, has been featured in several earlier entries in this thread. He was a Tae Kwon Do black belt from Taiwan. During his heyday as an onscreen villain in the ‘80s, he had a reputation for having little control on set. Hong Kong actor Philip Ko Fei (another famous onscreen villain) had a rather low opinion of Dick Wei after having worked with him, as did martial artist and former stuntman Mark Houghton, among others.

The lanky thug who pulls the small dagger is Pomson Shi (AKA Sin Lam-Yuk), who played the co-lead in Duel of the 7 Tigers (posted earlier in this thread). He played good guys in some late-‘70s kung fu films, but was often cast as heavies in ‘80s Hong Kong gangster/action films. IRL, Pomson Shi was a kung fu classmate of Shaw Brothers legend Chen Kuan-Tai, and like Chen, had also been a full-contact fighting champion. The kung fu system he studied is Tai Shing Pek Kwar (Mandarin pronunciation: Da Sheng Pi Gua), a northern Chinese system that combines Monkey style, Pi Gua (“splitting and hanging”), and Ditang (“ground boxing”).

Final fight: Yukari Oshima vs Dick Wei; Max Mok & Aaron Kwok vs Pomson Shi & Chang Seng-Kwong; Max Mok & Yukari Oshima vs Dick Wei:

https://youtu.be/fflvRG0Lr-k

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Wed Feb 10, 2021 3:43 pm

Dragon Fight (1989, Hong Kong; filmed in San Francisco/Bay Area). Director: Billy Tang Hin-Shing. Action director: Dick Wei.

Dragon Fight was the first Jet Li movie filmed in the US. It was also his first movie set in modern times. It came out during an ‘in-between’ period of Jet Li’s career; his superstardom from his debut,‘Shaolin Temple’ (1982), and its follow-up films, had gone stale. And he was still two years away from starring in ‘Once Upon a Time in China’ (1991), which revitalized his career.

This movie was Dick Wei’s first time serving as action director.

Stephen Chow (Chow Sing-Chi), a very popular Hong Kong star, also had a role in the film, but he’s not in this scene. Stephen Chow is mostly known in the West for his movies ‘Shaolin Soccer’ (2001), and ‘Kung Fu Hustle’ (2004).

Filmed in the San Francisco Bay Area, this movie also featured several American martial artists who were famous at the time on the national tournament scene and the martial arts magazines. Those I was most familiar with are: Ernie Reyes Sr. (not in this scene), George Chung, Kenny Perez, and Steven Ho.

I hate the English dubbing in this clip, even though the movie was filmed in the States. The English dubbing is awful. But this was the only available clip on YouTube that has the final fight in its entirety. IMO, the movie itself is only fair, and mostly of interest for the time period it came out in.

Final,fight: Jet Li vs Dick Wei: Jet Li & Dick Wei vs thugs (Mark Williams, George Chung, Steven Ho, Scott Coker, Li Jin-Heng, Yu Shao-Wen, Kenny Perez, Newby Lozada, Russ Lozada); Jet Li & Dick Wei vs Mark Williams:

https://youtu.be/mZ_JbKhaHsE

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Fri Feb 12, 2021 11:32 am

Benny “The Jet” Urquidez Tribute.

Since the late 1970s, Benny Urquidez has been one of my martial arts idols, and I have VERY FEW of those. He came from both a traditional and an eclectic martial arts background, and IMO, became the best pound-for-pound American kickboxer of all time.

Benny Urquidez came from a large martial arts family. Back in the 1960s and early 70s, after they developed a strong martial arts base, he and his brothers used to join as many martial arts schools in the Los Angeles area as they could find; then, after a period of time, they’d all get together and share what they had learned. They just wanted to gain as much awareness of martial arts as they could. One of the schools Benny studied at for a while was my Choy Lee Fut sifu’s old L.A. school. Benny trained grappling extensively under “Judo” Gene LeBell, one of the toughest men around. Benny earned his first black belt in Kenpo karate at age 14, something that was virtually unheard of in the 1960s. He definitely learned the old-school way, and had lots of street experience as well.

The tribute clip below shows scenes from his movie appearances, as well as some of his actual kickboxing bouts. To this day, he remains my favorite sports fighter. Most importantly to me, he has always maintained respect for all martial arts. He was always supremely confident, yet has always remained humble.

Benny’s classic fight scene against Jackie Chan in Wheels on Meals (1984) remains one of my all-time favorite fight scenes, and was even the first post in this thread. His second movie with Jackie, Dragons Forever (1988), also posted earlier in this thread, was also great, but not quite as great as their first go-round.

Benny was one of the very few professional fighters who easily made the transition from in-ring fighting to screen fighting. Most pro fighters who have attempted that transition have come across less-than-spectacular onscreen. In Wheels on Meals (which was only Benny’s second movie appearance after the 1981 American movie Force: Five), Benny was able to easily match a peak-era Jackie Chan’s speed, agility and athleticism.

Among other things, Benny also appeared in (and was the fight coordinator for) Grosse Pointe Blank, and he fight-directed Patrick Swayze in Roadhouse. David Lee Roth of Van Halen had been a student of Benny’s. He claimed that Benny was the inspiration for the song “Jump”.

https://youtu.be/uaWUXqTGO1c

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Sat Feb 13, 2021 10:13 am

Wheels on Meals (1984, Hong Kong; filmed in Barcelona, Spain). Director and action director: Sammo Hung.

This is a reposting of the first fight scene posted in this thread, the video of which was removed from YouTube sometime ago. This is also a more complete version of the final fight scene, which was filmed in a Spanish castle in Barcelona. The version I had posted before only showed the Jackie Chan/Benny Urquidez fight, and the rest had been edited out. In this clip, only the very end of Sammo Hung’s weapons fight with Pepe Sancho is missing, which really isn’t much. I decided to revisit this movie’s final fight, since my last post, the tribute to Benny Urquidez, mentions it; I figured I may as well show it here, rather than edit the new video into post #1.

The only Westerners in Wheels on Meals who were not Spanish actors were the American martial artists Benny Urquidez and Keith Vitali, and veteran American actor Herb Edelman. Keith Vitali was an American karate tournament point fighting champion. Previous to Wheels on Meals, Keith Vitali’s first movie role was in the American movie Revenge of the Ninja, starring Sho Kosugi.

Benny Urquidez’s fighting performance is so powerful that his diminutive size (5’ 6”) is not a factor, and is barely even noticeable.

Sammo Hung’s directing usually made Jackie Chan’s fight scenes much better and more intense than in Jackie’s own self-directed films. This is my all-time favorite Jackie Chan fight scene.

Unfortunately, the fight between Yuen Biao and Keith Vitali was only presented as an afterthought, with Yuen Biao mostly just trying to get away from him; it could have been much better. Between Jackie Chan, Sammo Hung and Yuen Biao, Yuen Biao was widely known as the best acrobat and pure physical talent.

Final fight: Jackie Chan vs Benny Urquidez; Yuen Biao vs Keith Vitali; Sammo Hung vs Pepe Sancho:

https://youtu.be/JT2rdvgFgMw

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby Makunochimaster » Sun Feb 14, 2021 10:47 am

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:spyder: Native 5 s110v Lightweight
:spyder: Ambitious 8Cr13MoV ;)

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Tue Feb 16, 2021 1:07 pm

Sorcerer (1977, USA; filmed mostly in the Dominican Republic). Director: William Friedkin.

Holdup scene: Roy Scheider & Francisco Rabal vs bandits:

https://youtu.be/WxrV38_XaK0

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Tue Feb 16, 2021 10:19 pm

Boyka: Undisputed 4 (2016, USA; filmed in Bulgaria). Director: Todor Chapkanov & Isaac Florentine (uncredited).

Unfortunately, clicking on these videos only gives you links to watch them on YouTube. For whatever reason, none of the videos from this movie can be watched embedded on other websites.

IMO, most of the earlier fights in this movie are much better than the final fight.

Scott Adkins vs Emilien DeFalco:

https://youtu.be/ziyZBQ3zl68

Scott Adkins vs Tim Man & Andreas Nguyen:

https://youtu.be/T9LJUbqGwy8

Final fight: Scott Adkins vs Martyn Ford:

https://youtu.be/SQVqYOK0B-0

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Sun Feb 21, 2021 10:15 pm

Tiger Cage II (1990, Hong Kong). Director: Yuen Woo-Ping. Action directors: Yuen Shun-Yi, Yuen Cheung-Yan, Donnie Yen & Kuo Chui.

Michael Woods was a student of Donnie Yen’s mother, Bow-Sim Mark, in Boston. Donnie brought him and a couple others to Hong Kong to appear in some of his films.

Final fight: Donnie Yen vs Michael Woods:

https://youtu.be/cie9tr-aStU

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Thu Feb 25, 2021 3:02 pm

Flash Point (2007, Hong Kong). Director: Wilson Yip. Action director: Donnie Yen.

I already posted this movie’s final fight between Donnie Yen and Collin Chou, on page 1 of this thread, the 9th post.

I liked it more when Donnie Yen fought like this, than the way he did in the Ip Man movies. IMO, it just suits him better. Some other Hong Kong actors, like Ti Lung or Gordon Liu, were better at stylized ‘kung fu’ fighting in period films than they were at modern action. But Donnie Yen seemed better suited to modern-day action, fighting more ‘freestyle’, where he seemed far less constrained. Again, in my opinion.

Donnie Yen vs Xing Yu:

https://youtu.be/vLOBIDMhDTs

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Wed Mar 03, 2021 9:06 pm

Street Knight (1993, USA). Director: Albert Magnoli. Stunt coordinator: Rick Avery.

Jeff Speakman was an interesting addition to the American martial arts/action movie genre in the 1990s. Holding black belts in both the Goju-ryu and Kenpo karate systems (but clearly specializing in Kenpo), he brought a unique fighting style to American screens for the time period.

The video below contains a few fight scenes, including the full one-on-one fight between Jeff Speakman and former WWF wrestler Tom Magee.

For some reason, cowboy boots were generally the footwear of choice for the heroes in ‘80s and ‘90s American martial arts/action flicks. I’m not sure if that trend was inspired from as far back as the 1967 film The Born Losers, starring Tom Laughlin (which was the first movie that featured the Billy Jack character); or if the influence started with Chuck Norris in the early ‘80s. All I know is that all the major American (or US-based) martial arts/action ‘heroes’ of that era (Chuck Norris, Jeff Speakman, Jean-Claude Van Damme, Steven Seagal, Phillip Rhee, mainstream star Mel Gibson, etc.) wore cowboy boots in at least one or more of their films. I wonder if the fashion mandate was made at some Hollywood board meeting.

Fight scenes, including Jeff Speakman vs Tom Magee:

https://youtu.be/Bu-jO4KkFeQ

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Sat Mar 06, 2021 12:30 pm

Lone Wolf McQuade (1983; USA). Director: Steve Carver. Stunt coordinator: Aaron Norris.

Full movie.

I was never a big fan of Chuck Norris’s own movies, but Lone Wolf McQuade was one of his better ones (the best being Code of Silence, IMO). This movie also has the best soundtrack music of any Chuck Norris movie, courtesy of Italian composer Francesco De Masi.

Of course, the movie’s big draw was the “karate vs kung fu” fight between Chuck Norris and David Carradine. In reality, the disparity between Chuck Norris and David Carradine in terms of martial arts ability was blatantly obvious. David Carradine learned a bit of the Tanglang (Praying Mantis) system of kung fu from Kam Yuen for the TV series ‘Kung Fu’, but he never achieved a high level in the art, which was evident from his ponderous movements. The Praying Mantis system is renowned for its explosive speed, maneuverability, and whole-body coordination, none of which he ever exhibited. Even as far back as when the ‘Kung Fu’ TV series was in its original run, I never thought that David Carradine looked convincing as a fighter. What David Carradine WAS great at was acting the part of very articulate, arrogant villains, much better than his good guy portrayal of Kwai Chang Caine.

Final fight (from 1:34:37): Chuck Norris vs David Carradine:

https://youtu.be/TU_t60Ty3F8

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Thu Mar 11, 2021 9:52 am

Iron Monkey (1993, Hong Kong). Director: Yuen Woo-Ping. Action directors: Yuen Cheung-Yan, Yuen Shun-Yi & Ku Huey-Chiu.

Note: This “Iron Monkey” is not to be confused with the 1977 “Iron Monkey,” which starred Chen Kuan-Tai, and which I will address in a later post.

Starting in 1991, the kung fu period film experienced a resurgence of popularity (which lasted a few years) in Hong Kong cinema, due to the success of Once Upon a Time in China, which starred Jet Li, whose career was also reinvigorated. Iron Monkey (1993) was a part of that wave of popularity.

The period movies of this era were characterized by martial artists possessing almost ‘god-like’ superpowers. Of course, many of the wuxia (martial hero/swordsman) movies from the ‘60s, ‘70s and early ‘80s also featured people with impossibly exaggerated powers, but never to the degree that they did in the ‘90s. This is mostly thanks to director Yuen Woo-Ping (also written as Yuen Wo-Ping), who later action-directed several American films (The Matrix trilogy, Kill Bill 1 & 2, Charlie’s Angels, etc.) along with his brothers (including Yuen Cheung-Yan and Yuen Shun-Yi).

Co-leading man Yu Rong-Guang, playing the title character (a masked Robin Hood-like hero called “Iron Monkey”), has made over 70 films. But he may be most familiar to audiences in the West for playing the villain in the 2010 remake of The Karate Kid, starring Jackie Chan and Jaden Smith. He also had a small supporting role in Shanghai Noon, starring Jackie Chan and Owen Wilson.

IMO, the main fight in the first clip, with Donnie Yen fighting the four evil monks in “ninja-like” garb, is the best fight in the movie, even though there is considerable under-cranking (speeding up) of some of the action.

(From 1:07): Donnie Yen (with Yuen Shun-Yi) vs evil monks (Chun Kwai-Bo, Chan Siu-Wah, Chan Chi-Man & Yip Choi-Nam; Donnie Yen vs Li Hui:

https://youtu.be/27jKi-tlmwA

Final fight (Featuring Yu Rong-Guang, Donnie Yen, Jean Wang, Li Hui, Yen Shi-Kwan; Finale (from 2:39): Yu Rong-Guang & Donnie Yen vs Yen Shi-Kwan:

https://youtu.be/CFUHVlxZXH8

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Wed Mar 17, 2021 3:40 pm

Pedicab Driver (1989, Hong Kong). Director: Sammo Hung. Action directors: Sammo Hung Stuntmen’s Association, Brandy Yuen & Meng Hoi.

I posted this movie’s final fight on page 9 of this thread.

This scene is the only appearance of Lau Kar-Leung in this movie. IMO, Sammo Hung and Lau Kar-Leung were the best martial arts directors/choreographers during the golden era of Hong Kong action cinema. This was the only time they appeared together onscreen.

This is the full fight scene. Unfortunately, the picture quality is poor, but it’s as clear as this scene gets on youtube, which is a shame.

Lau Kar-Leung vs Sammo Hung:

https://youtu.be/roGHykV9PLA

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby OrangeShoes » Mon Mar 22, 2021 12:11 pm

Fight scenes are difficult to portray since it requires physical strength. One must be fit and flexible in order to perform different stunts. One of the best stunts that marked the social media is the korean series titled "Vagabond", which was released in the year 2019. Different fighting skills were portrayed like martial arts, use of guns and swords and boxing.

This is the trailer for your perusal.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kln4ByBiq-o

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Thu Mar 25, 2021 4:03 pm

Fatal Contact (2006, Hong Kong). Director: Dennis Law Sau-Yiu. Action director: Nicky Li.

These are only a few of this movie’s fights that I’ve decided to post.

Wu Jing vs Jan Paul Smith, Kenji Tanigaki & Andy On:

https://youtu.be/G_OHR_w-FV8

Wu Jing vs Xing Yu:

https://youtu.be/6_CXTNRckAI

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Sun Mar 28, 2021 4:18 pm

Dracula (US title: Horror of Dracula; 1958, UK). Director: Terence Fisher.

This British remake of Dracula, by Hammer Films, was retitled Horror of Dracula in the US, to avoid confusion with the original 1931 Dracula, by Universal Pictures. It can be argued that Christopher Lee’s portrayal of Dracula was the best in cinematic history; it was definitely far superior to Bela Lugosi’s Dracula.

Although I personally rate Gary Oldman’s portrayal of Dracula in Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992) at least as highly as Christopher Lee’s portrayals, if not higher, though they are very different. If there had been such a thing as a real “vampire” Dracula, he would have looked more like Oldman’s version, which had a greater resemblance to the historical prince of Wallachia (in Romania), Vlad Tepes (AKA Vlad Dracula; AKA Vlad the Impaler), upon whom the fictitious Dracula character was originally based.

Peter Cushing was also outstanding in the role of Dr. Van Helsing; IMO, he was the best Van Helsing.

This scene also features Michael Gough and Melissa Stribling.

Final fight: Van Helsing (Peter Cushing) vs Dracula (Christopher Lee):

https://youtu.be/ssvgMHCa45s

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Sat Apr 03, 2021 10:22 am

Project A II (1987, Hong Kong). Director: Jackie Chan. Action directors: Jackie Chan’s Stuntmen Association.

Gangster den fight: Jackie Chan & friends vs gangsters (Chan Wai-Man, Wang Lung-Wei, Mickey Ng, & etc.):

https://youtu.be/TE8ny9d8M08

Final fight, part 1: Jackie Chan vs Manchu agents (John Cheung, Chu Tiet-Wo & Lee Hoi-Sang):

https://youtu.be/78ZxKb0wnQU

Final fight, part 2: Jackie Chan vs John Cheung, Chu Tiet-Wo & Lee Hoi-Sang:

https://youtu.be/aKfj52WdFcY

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Tue Apr 06, 2021 9:32 pm

:) :) Tom Yum Goong (AKA The Protector; 2005, Thailand). Filmed in Thailand and Australia. Director: Prachya Pinkaew. Stunt coordinator: Panna Rittikrai.

I had already posted at least one of the fights (the bone breaking scene) from this movie early in this thread.

At one time, Thai superstar Tony Jaa was the number one post-2K prospect for international superstar and future of martial arts films. Tom Yum Goong (AKA The Protector) was filmed as Tony Jaa’s career was approaching the peak of his ascension. Unfortunately, during filming of the subsequent films Ong Bak 2 (2008) and Ong Bak 3 (2010), he suffered a mental breakdown and took time away from the film industry. When he came back for Tom Yum Goong 2 (AKA The Protector 2; 2013), he had lost the “fire” and the great choreography (and the stunt team) that had gained him his international recognition in 2003’s Ong Bak: Muay Thai Warrior. In more recent years, he has taken small roles in Hollywood films and co-starred in inferior straight-to-video films that have done nothing for his career, other than provide paychecks. Tony Jaa is an outstanding martial artist and athlete, but his onscreen fighting style requires youth. Now, at age 45, much of his potential to have made greater and greater films has likely evaporated for him.

Back in 2003, when Ong Bak: Muay Thai Warrior got released internationally, one reviewer claimed that Tony Jaa was doing things that Jackie Chan could only dream of. Clearly, that reviewer had never seen Jackie Chan in his prime. Jackie Chan literally made FULL USE of ALL of his time, his youth, his attributes, and all of his physical and creative potential. Jackie Chan’s, as well as Sammo Hung’s bodies of work and longevity will never be equaled in cinematic history (sorry, Ip Man fans, but not even by Donnie Yen). Tony Jaa will never even approach the achievements, bodies of work, and career longevity that Jackie (and Sammo) achieved. And even today, at age 67, Jackie is still more active in films than Tony Jaa is. This is not meant as a put-down of Tony Jaa, but before anyone makes comparisons between him and Jackie Chan, they should be educated comparisons.

Tony Jaa has made some great action films, but mostly he is an example of someone whose greatest onscreen potential was never fully realized. Of course, this is just my .02, FWIW.

The 6’11” tall Nathan Jones has also appeared in Hollywood films such as Troy (2004, starring Brad Pitt) and Mad Max: Fury Road (2015, starring Tom Hardy), among other movies. He also briefly was a WWE wrestler.

Final battle: Tony Jaa vs Nathan Jones, Jin Xing, and musclemen:

https://youtu.be/PzuIyAiaE8E

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Mon Apr 12, 2021 12:13 pm

Gong Shou Dao (2017, China). Director: Wen Zhang. Action director: Ku Huen-Chiu. Action consultants: Yuen Woo-Ping, Sammo Hung & Ching Siu-Tung.

Full short movie.

This short film was pretty much a vanity project for multi-billionaire business magnate Jack Ma (who, together with Jet Li, co-produced the film). Jack Ma is the co-founder and former executive chairman of Alibaba Group. But he’s also a long-time practitioner of Tai Chi. Ostensibly, its purpose was to celebrate Jack Ma’s love of Tai Chi and Chinese martial arts in general. But it’s obvious it was a vanity project. I suppose if you are a world-famous Chinese multi-billionaire like Jack Ma, you can pay to have almost all of the top, currently still-active Asian martial arts movie legends (and a few others) to either lose to you onscreen, or settle for a draw at best. The top stars Jack Ma faces are: Tony Jaa, Wu Jing, Donnie Yen & Jet Li. I’m surprised he didn’t get Jackie Chan and Iko Uwais in there, too.

However, the REAL evidence of vanity (and fantasy) is when all of the girls are calling Jack Ma “handsome” and “Prince Charming” as he walks through a brothel. Or maybe the entire story being a dream sequence meant it was a bit of self-satirizing humor.

This short film was actually quite well-made. I have to admit that Jack Ma didn’t do badly at all, considering he’s not an actor or screen fighter. I have seen many real-life fighters and martial arts champions who appeared in movies and didn’t look nearly as convincing nor as comfortable in screen fights, or just being onscreen in general.

My main reason for posting this is for its novelty. IMO, like most of the kung fu/wuxia movies out of Mainland China over the past several years (or couple decades), the fights suffer from an overuse of overcranking (slow-motion), CGI, and wire work. This gives the impression of “floatiness” instead of power. IMO, in general, slow motion should only be used sparingly, to accentuate certain key points and details of a fight scene. Too much slow motion creates monotony.

Jack Ma vs (listed in order of appearance)Tony Jaa, Jacky Heung, Natasha Liu-Bordizzo, Wu Jing, Zou Shi-Ming, Asashoryu Dolgorsuren, Donnie Yen & Jet Li:

https://youtu.be/Ynn4TegBrfw

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby Yomagn'tho » Mon Apr 12, 2021 6:22 pm

Glad to see some Zatoichi fans in this thread, while there have been longer, more choreographed, and flamboyant fight scenes in movies throughout the years, I still appreciate the Ichi-san fights because they are a bit more realistic in that they don't go overly long and are still great tot this day.

This fight is still one of my favorites, Ichi both won and lost (which is rare).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e_Ypt67TQyI
“That weapon will replace your tongue. You will learn to speak through it. And your poetry will now be written with blood”.......Nobody from "Dead Man"


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