Adventures in Sharpening: Paring Knives, Freehand on a Diamond Stone

If your topic has nothing to do with Spyderco, you can post it here.
User avatar
kennethsime
Member
Posts: 658
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2011 8:28 pm

Adventures in Sharpening: Paring Knives, Freehand on a Diamond Stone

Postby kennethsime » Mon Jul 01, 2013 2:57 pm

Hi all, thought I would share an experience with you all. My sharpening skills are advancing slowly, but surely, thanks in no small part to my readings on these forums.

While in the past my tool of choice has been the shop's Spyderco Sharpmaker, we also have an EZE LAP 52F 600-grit 2x4" diamond flat stone as a display at work, and I figured I'd give it a try. I've used it in the past to take a small chip out of my Stretch 2 (although I then had the edge re-done by a pro) but this time I needed to sharpen 5 (one red one is not pictured, I got excited that I was doing so well and forgot pics) roughly-used, inexpensive paring knives. The knives, from Kuhn-Rikon, are made in China of "Japanese high-carbon stainless steel," and feature a non-stick coating.

I finished the edges on an Idahone ceramic sharpener (crock sticks) with a 17-degree thinning angle and 22-degree micro bevel, although I'm not really sure what angle I set freehand, so take it for what you will.

I was really impressed with what I could do free-hand, maybe it's the steel, maybe the blade shape, or both, but these were relatively easy to get from won't-even-cut-paper dull to tears-real-clean-through-post-its sharp, taking maybe 30 seconds per side for the most part if I didn't have to take out a chip. I spent longer on the croc sticks, which I honestly could've left out but wanted to get an extra little polish.

This makes me really question if I want to buy a sharpmaker at all, or just invest in a set of Spyderco's full-size bench stones. I will try to get a little more experience sharpening differently-shaped blades first, I think.

Here's the full album, and here're some individual before and after shots:

Image

Before, you can see a fairly big chip in the middle of the blade.

Image

After, edge is smooth.

Image

Before, edge is rolled a bit just left of center.

Image

After, edge is smooth.

Image

Before, the tip has been bent out of whack, and blunted.

Image

After, had to take off a bit of the non-stick coating, but the tip is nice and centered/pointy again.

Image

An older one, this one has a smallish chip just right of center and a pretty rough edge.

Image

After, edge is pretty smooth.
C90GRE Stretch 2 ZDP-189 British Racing Green
C28GRE2 Dragonfly 2 ZDP-189 British Racing Green
C12BK2W Matriarch 2 Emerson Open
C81G2 Para Military 2
C81GPRGR2 Para Military 2 K390 Ranger Green
C223GPRGR Para 3 K390 Ranger Green

PaloArt
Member
Posts: 315
Joined: Fri Nov 30, 2007 10:42 am

Postby PaloArt » Mon Jul 01, 2013 3:11 pm

good work, just keep it up and your sharpening skills will get better and faster with practice. Best practice knives are kitchen knives of our friends and family :D many dull knives but after your attack knives will be screamingly sharp! Keep it up

User avatar
kennethsime
Member
Posts: 658
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2011 8:28 pm

Postby kennethsime » Mon Jul 01, 2013 3:53 pm

Thanks! I'm gonna keep it up on cheap kitchen knives, plenty of those to go around between my room mates and I.
PaloArt wrote:good work, just keep it up and your sharpening skills will get better and faster with practice. Best practice knives are kitchen knives of our friends and family :D many dull knives but after your attack knives will be screamingly sharp! Keep it up
C90GRE Stretch 2 ZDP-189 British Racing Green
C28GRE2 Dragonfly 2 ZDP-189 British Racing Green
C12BK2W Matriarch 2 Emerson Open
C81G2 Para Military 2
C81GPRGR2 Para Military 2 K390 Ranger Green
C223GPRGR Para 3 K390 Ranger Green


Return to “Off-Topic”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests