A Question for Gun Owners

If your topic has nothing to do with Spyderco, you can post it here.
User avatar
D1omedes
Member
Posts: 1274
Joined: Sat Aug 22, 2009 8:54 pm
Location: Houston, Texas, USA

A Question for Gun Owners

Postby D1omedes » Tue Jun 25, 2013 9:04 pm

Hi guys. I am interested in purchasing a semiautomatic sidearm as my first firearm. I am leaning heavily toward 9mm but have yet to test out .40 caliber.

My real question comes down to Glock or the Smith and Wesson M&P. I got to shoot both a M&P 9 (full size) and a Glock 19. It's strange, I don't have large hands but the Glock 19 felt kinda small in hand. Do you guys recommend one over the other?

Oh, I found out that the M&P felt a lot nicer in hand but I consistently shot low with it. The trigger felt a little strange also. The Glock felt a lot chunkier in hand and the raised finger bumps felt awkward. Still, the trigger was nicer and I was more accurate with the Glock.

.357 mag
Member
Posts: 1258
Joined: Tue Dec 07, 2010 4:29 pm

Postby .357 mag » Tue Jun 25, 2013 9:12 pm

Go with what feels good. Both are good guns. What are you doing with it? Target? CCW? Home defense?

User avatar
racer88
Member
Posts: 517
Joined: Fri Oct 29, 2010 8:24 pm

Postby racer88 » Tue Jun 25, 2013 9:24 pm

Ultimately, it comes down to what feels / works best for you.

User avatar
The Student
Member
Posts: 82
Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2012 12:10 am
Location: Ohio

Postby The Student » Tue Jun 25, 2013 9:31 pm

I have very little experience with the m&p line but I have heard good things, the gen 4 glocks have adjustable back straps that let you find the right fit, not sure if you got to experience that. I personally like the glocks as they have easy to find accessories. And depending on what you are going to use this firearm for, target shooting ect., I would go 9mm as traditionally the ammo is easier to find and less expensive than .40. In the end get what feels right.

User avatar
racer88
Member
Posts: 517
Joined: Fri Oct 29, 2010 8:24 pm

Postby racer88 » Tue Jun 25, 2013 10:03 pm

The Student wrote: I would go 9mm as traditionally the ammo is easier to find and less expensive than .40. In the end get what feels right.
haha... not these days! 9-mm has be extremely scarce, while .40 is available.

However, that will prove to be temporary... hopefully.

User avatar
D1omedes
Member
Posts: 1274
Joined: Sat Aug 22, 2009 8:54 pm
Location: Houston, Texas, USA

Postby D1omedes » Tue Jun 25, 2013 10:18 pm

I apologize for not mentioning this in the first place, but my first firearm purchase will be intended for home defense. So either pistol will be a full size model. This should help me while learning how to shoot in the first place (longer sight radius and reduced recoil).

My conundrum is that although the M&P felt better in hand, I was less accurate with it. Is that normal? Am I making a common novice mistake?

User avatar
noseoil
Member
Posts: 506
Joined: Sun Apr 07, 2013 5:28 pm

Postby noseoil » Tue Jun 25, 2013 10:21 pm

Shoot as many different models as you can find! Friends, guys at the local range, people who shoot near you are all good to talk with. Don't rush into it, take your time and save your money for something nice. I'm a bit prejudiced in my tastes (H&K P30 is a great weapon, but a bit spendy on the budget) but ultimately, the gun you shoot best will feel best in your hand and point well instinctively. Don't fall for a gun store jockey who will be a self-appointed expert and salesman. Find someone who will let you try out a few different weapons if possible, before you make any decisions. There are plenty of good people out there who will gladly share their knowledge if you ask.

What part of the country do you live in? What are you planning to carry for? How much can you afford to shoot? How does the grip feel? Take some lessons and a CCW course if you can, it will educate you on the responsibilities which go with gun ownership. Even if you don't carry concealed, it is worth knowing the laws in your area. Good luck!

User avatar
Jes Schuetz
Member
Posts: 38
Joined: Mon Jun 17, 2013 8:37 pm

Postby Jes Schuetz » Tue Jun 25, 2013 11:12 pm

had some weird 60 year old pistol in the German army and never hit anything at 15 yards.
Used a friends MP 9 (SW) and hit everything in one spot. Didn't try any other pistols yet.

Studey
Member
Posts: 579
Joined: Tue Oct 12, 2010 10:54 pm
Location: Indiana

Postby Studey » Tue Jun 25, 2013 11:29 pm

Go 9mm for sure. Less expensive is nice, but modern hollow points have closed any performance gaps there may once have been, and it has less recoil, which equals more pleasant training, less liklihood to develop recoil sensitivity, and faster follow up shots.

I like Glocks over M&Ps. Shooting low is more likely a grip issue than it is the specific gun, but go with whatever you shot best. Training and practice will improve on what already exists, so start well.

TomAiello
Member
Posts: 4309
Joined: Tue Jun 11, 2013 10:34 pm
Location: Twin Falls, ID

Postby TomAiello » Wed Jun 26, 2013 12:01 am

Was the Glock you shot a Gen 3 or a Gen 4?

If you're going to have just one gun, get one that fits your hand and you shoot well. For me, the Gen 4 Glock fits my hand better than the M&P, but the M&P fits better than the Gen 3 Glock. I also shoot best with the Gen 4 Glock, so my EDC is a Gen 4 Glock (the 23 in my case, but it's the same frame as the 19).

I'd also recommend going with 9mm in most cases, especially for a first handgun.

Is there any chance that someone other than you might need to use it? For example a wife or girlfriend when you are out of town? My home defense choices are built around the fact that my wife might be the adult who had to use the weapon to defend our children, so, for example, while I carry in .40, the nightstand pistol is a 9mm.

For what it's worth, I own both Glocks and M&P's, and the H&K P30 that Noseoil mentioned is my first choice for a handgun in a critical situation. He's right that it's spendy though--for what you'll pay you could get 2 Glocks or M&P's.

To agree with Noseoil again, training is the critical component. The best time and money I've ever spent on handgun training was MAG-40 course (see here: http://massadayoobgroup.com/?page_id=7). If buying a less expensive gun is the thing that allows you to afford better training and more range time, go with the cheaper gun and learn to use it better.

BAL
Member
Posts: 3463
Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2011 4:58 am
Location: Middle Earth

Postby BAL » Wed Jun 26, 2013 4:04 am

These are the personal preference type of questions where everyone has "their" own
opinion. (Para or Manix), (Chevy or Ford). I know I know, Chevy is the obvious answer
but you get what I mean.

Both are great guns built by great companies, you will not go wrong either way. I personally
like the Glocks. One they fit my hands and then I have found that as the days and years go
by, they fit even better. Much like the knife that took a while to get used to at first, then it
became an extension of your hand.

Also, Glock mags are normally cheaper and easy to find and they are interchangeable. A
Glock 26 can take a 10, 12, 15, 17 and 33 round mag, the 19 takes all but the 10 and 12
etc.

Also, all of the Glocks feel the same and work exactly the same, so that if you know
how to use one, then you can get another one in a different size or caliber and everything
feels and acts the same. That is very important to me, especially is a Personal protection
situation. The Glock 26 feels and works exactly like the 19, 17 or 34 in 9mm. etc.


In the long run, 9mm is easier to find and cheaper and don't buy all of the ballistic talk on
the larger rounds. Obviously a 50 cal will make a bigger hole than a 9, but with today's
technology of bullet, the 9mm is perfectly fine.

There are countless great 9MM choices for Self Defense, I have more boxes than I can
remember what they are, such as Hornady Critical defense, Glaser slugs etc.

Good look, enjoy the search, it's one of life's great pleasures..

User avatar
Pinetreebbs
Member
Posts: 1830
Joined: Sat Jun 26, 2010 6:55 am
Location: SC

Postby Pinetreebbs » Wed Jun 26, 2013 6:53 am

Go for the pistol that fits and shoot best for you. The best gun in the world is no good if you cannot hit the target. 9mm should be OK, the .40 will recoil more and that will impact your ability to shoot accurately and to make follow up shots.

That said, for home defense, a compact shotgun might be better. Less penetrating pistol rounds are out there, but may or may not function well in a particular handgun. Most pistol rounds will easily go thru common home walls and over penetrate most shot gun ammunition..
Have you joined Knife Rights yet?
Go to: http://www.KnifeRights.org
Protecting your Right to own and carry the knives YOU choose.

User avatar
kbuzbee
Member
Posts: 4762
Joined: Sun Aug 13, 2006 8:37 am
Location: Mentor, OH

Postby kbuzbee » Wed Jun 26, 2013 6:55 am

D1omedes wrote:I apologize for not mentioning this in the first place, but my first firearm purchase will be intended for home defense.
Others will certainly disagree with me but for home defense I truely prefer a shot gun over any handgun. Hand guns are great. Easily carried when your out. But if there's someone in my house, I'll grab the Ithica.

Ken
玉鋼

TomAiello
Member
Posts: 4309
Joined: Tue Jun 11, 2013 10:34 pm
Location: Twin Falls, ID

Postby TomAiello » Wed Jun 26, 2013 8:24 am

kbuzbee wrote:Others will certainly disagree with me but for home defense I truely prefer a shot gun over any handgun. Hand guns are great. Easily carried when your out. But if there's someone in my house, I'll grab the Ithica.
Have you fired a shotgun indoors?

In my opinion, if you want to use a shotgun for HD, good hearing protection for yourself and any other family members in the house is mandatory, not optional. The same is true for a rifle.

If I was looking for an "ultimate" home defense firearm, I'd probably go with a semi-auto rifle with a 20 or more round magazine and a suppressor, as well as several sets of electronic hearing protection (for the whole family). In fact, I'd go with multiple rifles (one for each adult in the household) and make them bull pups for easier indoor handling. But you'll be north of $5000 by the time you buy two AUGs, FS2000s or Tavors and their corresponding optical sights, hearing protection, suppressors and weapon lights.

D1, you list your location as Texas (which is a shall issue state). Are you likely to want to carry your firearm outside your home?

appliancejunk
Member
Posts: 69
Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2011 6:37 pm
Location: South Dakota

Postby appliancejunk » Wed Jun 26, 2013 9:14 am

I agree, go with what feels good and works best for you.

I'm a Ruger guy myself and love how my Ruger SR9C (9mm) feels and shoots for me.

User avatar
D1omedes
Member
Posts: 1274
Joined: Sat Aug 22, 2009 8:54 pm
Location: Houston, Texas, USA

Postby D1omedes » Wed Jun 26, 2013 9:23 am

Well, a shotgun would be ideal but I live in an apartment complex. Space is limited in my one bedroom and I doubt any of the gun ranges near me (most of which are indoor) will allow me to fire shotguns. This limits me to a handgun for ease of practice and maneuverability.

Yes, I do live in Texas and realize it is a "shall issue" state. While I have no desire to conceal carry right now, I do not rule that out in the future. Preferably, I would like to become confident and proficient with my home defense firearm before looking for a concealed carry option.

I am just curious about what advice you guys have for a new shooter. What particular nuances do I need to be aware of (ie. proper grip, trigger control, etc.). Further input on Glock vs M&P is appreciated as well. Thanks. :)

appliancejunk
Member
Posts: 69
Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2011 6:37 pm
Location: South Dakota

Postby appliancejunk » Wed Jun 26, 2013 9:27 am

Sometimes if I can't decide between purchasing two different items I buy them both and then down the road sell the one I don't want.

I did this with a Ruger SR9 and Ruger SR9C.

Shot both of them for months and decided the SR9C was the one for me.

Just a thought...

Sithus1966
Member
Posts: 802
Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2010 9:49 pm
Location: Michigan

Postby Sithus1966 » Wed Jun 26, 2013 9:43 am

The racking of a 12ga shotgun may make an intruder think twice about their actions. There is no doubt about what that sound is and what is on the other end of it.
C05, C05S, C10SRD, C10SBK(x2), C10FPBR, C10GRE, C10FPGR, C11, C11FPBK, C12SBK2, C14 C17 C21, C28BK, C28BK2, C28YL2, C36, C45, C54GPBN, C77, C80GPOR, C81, C81GS, C81GBK2, C85GP2, C86, C86P, C86PET, C90, C94, C95, C106, C109, C116, C122, C123CF, C123, C123GBL, C126(x2), C132GP, C135GP, C136, C137, C138, C140, C142, C146CFP, C148, C158TIP, C161GP, C162, C163PBK, C164GPBN, LBK, LBKII(x2), LYL3HB, LGRE3, MBK, FB20, FB23, FB24SBK, FB31SBK, FBPBK, MT12, MT13, MT16, Woodcraft.

User avatar
kbuzbee
Member
Posts: 4762
Joined: Sun Aug 13, 2006 8:37 am
Location: Mentor, OH

Postby kbuzbee » Wed Jun 26, 2013 9:48 am

TomAiello wrote:Have you fired a shotgun indoors?

In my opinion, if you want to use a shotgun for HD, good hearing protection for yourself and any other family members in the house is mandatory, not optional. The same is true for a rifle.
You raise a great point. But my Ithica is somewhat quiter than my S&W 500 ;) Fortunately I haven't ever fired it in my home. In an apartment environment, you need to be even more careful about over penetration. Just a thought.

Ken
玉鋼

TomAiello
Member
Posts: 4309
Joined: Tue Jun 11, 2013 10:34 pm
Location: Twin Falls, ID

Postby TomAiello » Wed Jun 26, 2013 10:40 am

Sithus1966 wrote:The racking of a 12ga shotgun may make an intruder think twice about their actions. There is no doubt about what that sound is and what is on the other end of it.
Honestly, I don't subscribe to the "rack the shotgun and he'll pee his pants" theory. In a real HD situation, I'd try to be as quiet and stealthy as possible--not give an audible clue to my location.


Return to “Off-Topic”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 11 guests