Favorite movie fight scenes

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James Y
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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Tue Apr 13, 2021 9:06 am

Yomagn'tho wrote:
Mon Apr 12, 2021 6:22 pm
Glad to see some Zatoichi fans in this thread, while there have been longer, more choreographed, and flamboyant fight scenes in movies throughout the years, I still appreciate the Ichi-san fights because they are a bit more realistic in that they don't go overly long and are still great tot this day.

This fight is still one of my favorites, Ichi both won and lost (which is rare).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e_Ypt67TQyI

Thanks for posting that, and welcome to the forum, Yomagn’tho.

The original Zatoichi (played by Shintaro Katsu) happens to be my all-time favorite movie character, period. And not just for the fight scenes, but for his overall character development. Which Shintaro Katsu had plenty of time to do over many years of playing Zatoichi. And yes, the fight scenes in the Zatoichi film series remain ageless.

As far as fight scenes go, for me personally, as long as I find them entertaining, I can enjoy all types. Realistic, unrealistic, short, long, simple, or complex. It simply depends on what genre of movie it is. The only criticisms of fight scenes I ever have are if (IMO) some aspect of a fight scene (choreography, cinematography, etc.) disrupts it, or somehow causes a particular scene to fall short of its potential.

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby Yomagn'tho » Tue Apr 13, 2021 12:13 pm

James Y wrote:
Tue Apr 13, 2021 9:06 am
Yomagn'tho wrote:
Mon Apr 12, 2021 6:22 pm
Glad to see some Zatoichi fans in this thread, while there have been longer, more choreographed, and flamboyant fight scenes in movies throughout the years, I still appreciate the Ichi-san fights because they are a bit more realistic in that they don't go overly long and are still great tot this day.

This fight is still one of my favorites, Ichi both won and lost (which is rare).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e_Ypt67TQyI

Thanks for posting that, and welcome to the forum, Yomagn’tho.

The original Zatoichi (played by Shintaro Katsu) happens to be my all-time favorite movie character, period. And not just for the fight scenes, but for his overall character development. Which Shintaro Katsu had plenty of time to do over many years of playing Zatoichi. And yes, the fight scenes in the Zatoichi film series remain ageless.

As far as fight scenes go, for me personally, as long as I find them entertaining, I can enjoy all types. Realistic, unrealistic, short, long, simple, or complex. It simply depends on what genre of movie it is. The only criticisms of fight scenes I ever have are if (IMO) some aspect of a fight scene (choreography, cinematography, etc.) disrupts it, or somehow causes a particular scene to fall short of its potential.

Jim
Thanks for the welcome. I am a big fan of Zatoichi myself, have watched all the movies multiple times over as well as the TV show. Don't get me wrong, I do enjoy most well done fight scenes regardless of their length or over the top antics.

Amazed nobody posted this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JP5uSX1UUtg
“That weapon will replace your tongue. You will learn to speak through it. And your poetry will now be written with blood”.......Nobody from "Dead Man"

James Y
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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Wed Apr 14, 2021 10:39 am

Yomagn'tho wrote:
Tue Apr 13, 2021 12:13 pm
James Y wrote:
Tue Apr 13, 2021 9:06 am
Yomagn'tho wrote:
Mon Apr 12, 2021 6:22 pm
Glad to see some Zatoichi fans in this thread, while there have been longer, more choreographed, and flamboyant fight scenes in movies throughout the years, I still appreciate the Ichi-san fights because they are a bit more realistic in that they don't go overly long and are still great tot this day.

This fight is still one of my favorites, Ichi both won and lost (which is rare).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e_Ypt67TQyI

Thanks for posting that, and welcome to the forum, Yomagn’tho.

The original Zatoichi (played by Shintaro Katsu) happens to be my all-time favorite movie character, period. And not just for the fight scenes, but for his overall character development. Which Shintaro Katsu had plenty of time to do over many years of playing Zatoichi. And yes, the fight scenes in the Zatoichi film series remain ageless.

As far as fight scenes go, for me personally, as long as I find them entertaining, I can enjoy all types. Realistic, unrealistic, short, long, simple, or complex. It simply depends on what genre of movie it is. The only criticisms of fight scenes I ever have are if (IMO) some aspect of a fight scene (choreography, cinematography, etc.) disrupts it, or somehow causes a particular scene to fall short of its potential.

Jim
Thanks for the welcome. I am a big fan of Zatoichi myself, have watched all the movies multiple times over as well as the TV show. Don't get me wrong, I do enjoy most well done fight scenes regardless of their length or over the top antics.

Amazed nobody posted this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JP5uSX1UUtg

Thanks for posting that! I hadn’t seen that one before. Interestingly, at the end of the clip, the blonde fighter is speaking Mandarin Chinese.

*Edit:
Having just looked up info on the plot, the villain is a Westerner trained in Chinese swordsmanship who is working with Ming dynasty Chinese swordsmen. Hence his speaking of Mandarin. And the hero is also a Westerner, but trained in Japanese swordsmanship.

Jim
Last edited by James Y on Wed Apr 14, 2021 1:17 pm, edited 6 times in total.

James Y
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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Wed Apr 14, 2021 11:32 am

Merantau (2009, Indonesia). Director: Gareth Evans.

Iko Uwais is an expert in the Indonesian martial art of Silat. He was discovered by Welsh director Gareth Evans when Evans was invited to Indonesia to film a documentary on Silat. He noticed Iko Uwais’s natural charisma among the students in the Silat training hall. At the time, Uwais had been working as a delivery man for a phone company. Evans invited him to star in the lead role of his first martial arts movie, Merantau.

Gareth Evans is highly unusual as a director; unlike many European (and American) filmmakers who have made movies in Asian countries, he avoided the usual stereotyping, fetishizing, and Westernized POV of the native people and culture. These were truly Indonesian movies. Evans, Iko Uwais, and their stunt team created amazing movies: Merantau (2009), The Raid: Redemption (2011), and The Raid 2: Berandal (2014). Scenes from both ‘Raid’ movies have been posted earlier in this thread. Each movie was substantially better than the previous one. There was a Raid 3 planned, which was scrapped. Gareth Evans ended up returning to Wales, and Iko Uwais began making appearances in Hollywood films. So far, nothing that Iko Uwais has done in Hollywood even approaches the level and quality of his work in Indonesia with Gareth Evans.

When Merantau first came out, some people referred to Iko Uwais as an Indonesian “Tony Jaa lite.” However, by his second film, The Raid: Redemption, it was clear that Iko Uwais (and Gareth Evans) had something very special. They had surpassed the quality of any of the Thai industry’s martial arts films (which were still popular at the time) due to quality of storyline, acting, choreography, etc. Although Merantau was his very first movie and acting experience, Iko Uwais did a fantastic job.

If anybody thinks that acting in a movie (especially in a lead role, and without any previous acting experience), or that performing convincingly and looking good in fight scenes (especially martial arts-related fight scenes) on camera is easy, they should try it for themselves on video. Almost everyone “thinks” they could look good onscreen. However, many veteran martial artists and champion fighters have looked unimpressive in movies. There are many factors that must work together to determine how someone comes across onscreen: Natural charisma/screen presence; acting ability; skill set; the choreography; the camera work/cinematography; the ability and willingness to follow directions; adaptability; rhythm; reaction timing; the other fighters and stunt people, etc. It is truly an art form.

Elevator fight: Iko Uwais vs Yayan Ruhian:

https://youtu.be/UDIlDOnDNeY

Final fight: Iko Uwais vs Mads Koudal, Laurent Buson, & henchmen:

https://youtu.be/4LiXUUwXWCg

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby shunsui » Sat Apr 17, 2021 7:19 am

Was trying to remember what movie this was in for a long time.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z83IyEgxPrk

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Sun Apr 18, 2021 8:33 pm

shunsui wrote:
Sat Apr 17, 2021 7:19 am
Was trying to remember what movie this was in for a long time.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z83IyEgxPrk

Thanks, shunsui. That’s a good fight scene.

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Sun Apr 18, 2021 8:54 pm

The Rebel (2007, Vietnam). Director: Charlie Nguyen. Stunt/action director: Johnny Tri Nguyen.

Leading man Johnny Tri Nguyen previously worked as a stuntman in Hollywood on such films as Spider-Man 2 and Jarhead. He later left Hollywood to become an action star in his native Vietnam.

Arch-villain Dustin Nguyen (no relation to Johnny Tri Nguyen) was probably most familiar to fans of the ‘80s series 21 Jump Street, as one of Johnny Depp’s co-stars. He is also a martial artist. Like Johnny Tri Nguyen, Dustin Nguyen left Hollywood and returned to live in Vietnam full-time.

Dustin Nguyen’s arch-villain character is portrayed as possessing some degree of “Iron Shirt/Iron Cloth” (Tie Bu Shan), a type of “invincibility” skill. Although its portrayal in this movie is less exaggerated than it is usually portrayed in Chinese kung fu films. Meaning, he is resilient and even has some degree of immunity to injury (some blows, and even against some knife cuts), but he is far from “invincible.”

Villa fight: Veronica Ngo & Johnny Tri Nguyen vs Dustin Nguyen:

https://youtu.be/P4b9-Ng5OpU

Final fight: Johnny Tri Nguyen & Veronica Ngo vs Dustin Nguyen:

https://youtu.be/e_PU_4NQbj8

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Sat Apr 24, 2021 7:18 pm

Unstoppable (2018, South Korea). Director: Kim Min-Ho.

Leading man Ma Dong-Seok (AKA, Don Lee) is a Korean-American actor who was born in South Korea, but immigrated with his family to Ohio when he was in high school. He was the former physical trainer of MMA fighters Mark Coleman and Kevin Randleman. Now he has become one of South Korea’s top actors.

Park Kwang-Jae (the big guy) is a former professional player in the Korean Basketball League.

Final fight: Ma Dong-Seok (Don Lee) vs thugs and Park Kwang-Jae:

https://youtu.be/TeJrnACJoAQ

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Thu May 06, 2021 1:35 am

Ong Bak 2: The Beginning (2008, Thailand). Directors: Tony Jaa & Panna Rittikrai. Action director: Tony Jaa.

This clip includes the entire final fight. If the ending seems incomplete and like a lead-in to the sequel, it is. However, IMO, Ong Bak 2 was much better than Ong Bak 3.

The first Ong Bak movie (an earlier entry in this thread) was set in modern times. Parts 2 and 3 were set in 15th-century Siam (now called Thailand). For this film, Tony Jaa incorporated both Chinese kung fu (Fu Ying Kuen, or Tiger Shape Fist), along with some Chinese weapons, and some Japanese martial arts, including some Jujutsu and swordplay, together with his Muay Boran. This was definitely among Tony Jaa’s best fight scenes. It starts becoming truly special the longer it goes, and this was probably the longest and most complex fight scene in any of Tony Jaa’s films, when his enthusiasm was still high, and he was still at his physical/athletic peak.

Final fight: Tony Jaa vs Tim Man, Kazu Patrick Tang, & others:

https://youtu.be/mDWCCtp33zE

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Mon May 10, 2021 1:52 pm

The Hunter (2011, Australia). Director: Daniel Nettheim.

This is a very good but underrated independent film.

This scene should be of particular interest to Spyderco fans, as it features a PE saber-ground Delica 4. The knife was shown once or twice earlier in the movie in a utilitarian role. Willem Dafoe might have freed himself sooner if his knife had been in SE. ;)

Willem Dafoe vs Callan Mulvey.

https://youtu.be/V-PNT54Z2ig

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby Taahid Lodi » Thu May 13, 2021 3:11 am

Great stuff! I’m a bit of a Jackie Chan fan. Really, really liked the film Ip Man, too, but couldn’t pick out any one fight scene.

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Thu May 13, 2021 8:41 am

Taahid Lodi wrote:
Thu May 13, 2021 3:11 am
Great stuff! I’m a bit of a Jackie Chan fan. Really, really liked the film Ip Man, too, but couldn’t pick out any one fight scene.

Greetings, Taahid Lodi. Glad you’re enjoying it!

Oh, and welcome to the forum!

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Wed May 19, 2021 10:30 am

Five Superfighters (1979, Hong Kong). Director: Lo Mar. Action director: Hsu Hsia.

Full movie. Video quality is poor.

This has long been one of my favorite kung fu comedy films, but like all the films by Shaw Brothers Studio, it’s extremely difficult to find on YouTube, especially in remastered version, due to licensing issues with Hong Kong’s Celestial Pictures, the company that remastered the Shaw Brothers film library. If they are put on YT, they’re usually removed pretty quickly. The only reason this version has been on YT for as long as it has is because it’s clearly NOT a Celestial remaster. Unfortunately, the video quality is poor. But it’s the only full version of this movie available to view online for free. For fans like myself, who originally saw this and other Shaw Brothers classics in movie theaters, for many years afterwards, the only way to see them again was on poor-quality VHS tapes, like this version obviously came from. So I’m somewhat used to the poor quality. I do own a remastered widescreen DVD of this movie, though.

The storyline is bare-bones simple: An old master of Monkey-style kung fu (played by Hau Chiu-Sing) and his three students are beaten and humiliated by a wandering kung fu expert (Kuan Feng), who “corrects bad kung fu” by beating up any kung fu practitioners he comes across. Afterwards, the three students sneak off separately to find different teachers, so they can learn enough to come back and avenge their teacher. They all agree to return in six months, on their teacher’s birthday. One student (Ng Yuen-Jun) learns Crane style from a cripple; another (Tony Leung Siu-Hung) learns kicking from a bean curd (tofu) seller; the third (Austin Wai) learns staff fighting from a fisherman. Meanwhile, the teacher, feeling abandoned, becomes a bitter drunk and begins practicing drunken broadsword. The movie is full of fight and training sequences, but I’m only highlighting the final fight.

IMO, Kuan Feng, who played the villain, was the most underrated screen villain of all time. He rarely got to show the full extent of his talents. Besides this movie, his other great performance was in Monkey Kung Fu (see post #2 on page 1 of this thread).

Note: The sound starts to crap out at the very end of the final fight scene, but you can still see it to the end.

Final fight (from 1:21:40): Ng Yuen-Jun, Tony Leung Siu-Hung, Austin Wai & Hau Chiu-Sing vs Kuan Feng:

https://youtu.be/1-V53260zFo

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Fri May 28, 2021 9:30 am

Philip Ko Fei (1949 - 2017)

Philip Ko Fei was one of my all-time favorite kung fu movie actors. He was one of the most versatile all-around performers. Occasionally, he played lead roles and heroic supporting roles, but for the most part he was cast as villains, which he particularly excelled at. He started his film career out as a stunt extra in Shaw Brothers films. He was also a stunt extra on Enter the Dragon, which he discusses in this video. Aside from mis-remembering Bruce Lee’s side kick to Bob Wall as having been a left leg kick (Bruce actually did it right-legged), his account of what happened on the Enter the Dragon set is interesting.

This interview was from 1993. Filmed and translated by Toby Russell.

https://youtu.be/kshIwhrzX9Q

Philip Ko Fei tribute:

Several of the movies these snippets are taken from have been featured earlier in this thread. But Ko Fei was in so many movies that one single, extensive tribute would be impossible.

https://youtu.be/rD70bQ8fQfU

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Mon May 31, 2021 2:50 pm

The Night Comes For Us (2018, Indonesia). Director: Timo Tjahjanto. Action director: Iko Uwais.

NOTE: THIS POST WILL BE CONTINUED IN THE NEXT POST.

The fight scenes in this movie are among the most brutal; at the same time, the choreography is very high-level, and these scenes are definitely not for the squeamish.

Warehouse fight, Part 1: Joe Taslim vs rival gangsters:

*Note: For some reason, whoever posted this added unrelated Jason Statham footage during the first 14 seconds.*

https://youtu.be/jFKHDjQnacg

Warehouse fight, Part 2:

https://youtu.be/RGWT97mfJqo

Final fight, Part 1: Joe Taslim vs Iko Uwais:

*Note: The first 13 seconds is an unrelated scene of Wesley snipes from Blade.*

https://youtu.be/cZR7yW56ufQ

CONTINUED NEXT POST…

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Mon May 31, 2021 2:56 pm

The Night Comes For Us

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS POST:

Final fight, Part 2: Joe Taslim bs Iko Uwais:

https://youtu.be/FDY5Cw872ow

Final fight, Part 3:

https://youtu.be/lL31g0WsgM8

Final Fight, Part 4:

https://youtu.be/YYQoif9dyZA

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Wed Jun 02, 2021 11:49 pm

A Grande Arte (US title: Exposure; 1991, Brazil). Director: Walter Salles Jr. Knife fighting coach: Christopher Kent.

This film is a cult classic, but is extremely rare and difficult to find now.

Knife purveyor scene and knife training sequence, Part 1: Peter Coyote and Tcheky Karyo:

https://youtu.be/lBHqU-OJfc4

Knife training sequence, Part 2: Peter Coyote and Tcheky Karyo:

https://youtu.be/VZVeMwMO3mw

Final fight: Peter Coyote vs Raul Cortez:

https://youtu.be/T_b_8zALIoU

Jim

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Re: Favorite movie fight scenes

Postby James Y » Sun Jun 13, 2021 12:31 pm

Shaolin Temple (1976, Hong Kong). Director: Chang Cheh. Action directors: Hsieh Hsing & Chen Hsin-Yi.

Note: This movie is NOT to be confused with the 1982 Mainland Chinese movie also titled ‘Shaolin Temple’, which was Jet Li’s first movie. Despite sharing the same title, the two movies are unrelated.

IMO, the bits shown in this video clip feature what I consider parts of the movie’s best fight scene. Unfortunately, this clip only shows small bits of the fight. Like most Shaw Brothers films, the entire movie is not available to view online (at least not for free). And no one has properly posted this fight scene (or any of the movie’s other fight scenes during the epic, large-scale final battle, which are many). So it was either post this video clip or nothing of this fight scene. **I absolutely HATE the rap music added by whoever uploaded the video to YT.**

Part of fight scene: Ti Lung (with David Chiang) vs Wang Lung-Wei:

https://youtu.be/AsWO0DWsA1c

Below, I’ve also included a video showing Ti Lung teaching Wing Chun Chi Sao (Sticking Hands), which I also posted on the Martial Arts Experiences Discussion Thread:

https://youtu.be/v8QcPXWjlLk

Jim


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