Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

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Wartstein
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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby Wartstein » Mon Sep 07, 2020 4:04 pm

ladybug93 wrote:
Mon Sep 07, 2020 3:50 pm
Wartstein wrote:
Mon Sep 07, 2020 3:25 pm
ladybug93 wrote:
Mon Sep 07, 2020 2:35 pm
A bit off topic but I´d have a question:

I totally agree that the Manix has one of the most useful blade shapes and is a great EDC knife (except for the short cutting edge).
But I don´t understand what you mean by "slight belly" and comparing it to a wharncliffe - ?!

A wharncliffe for me is defined by a totally straight edge with no belly at all.
The Manix on the other hand is all belly, its edge is a continuous curve from heel to tip and by that nothing like a wharncliffe...
What would be a lot more "wharncliffy" in my opinion is the Stretch: This knife actually has a very long, totally straight section in the edge that rises to a belly just quite close to the tip (btw a rather unique "edge shape" for Spyderco - many popular models (PM2...) have more or less that continous curve in the edge)
yes. i'm aware that a wharncliffe is completely straight and the manix has a continuous curve. however, the curve on the manix is fairly gradual. what i'm saying is that between the gentle curve and negative angle, it acts similarly to a wharncliffe with the tip being lower and the curve less likely to slide off of the work, but also has the versatility of a slight belly for slicing.

Thanx, now I get it! :)
Top three going by pocket-time: Endura 4 in VG 10/Micarta-scales; Stretch 1 in VG 10; Endura 4 in HAP 40

wrdwrght
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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby wrdwrght » Mon Sep 07, 2020 4:13 pm

Evil D wrote:
Mon Sep 07, 2020 11:25 am
2. Blade ricasso/plunge line design (?). Not even sure what to call that, basically I want the edge as close to the handle as possible and I DO NOT want any sharpening choils or notches or whatever, I don't want anything but edge all the way up to the handle. This detail combined with #1 gives me a grip that positions my index finger right up at the edge just about the same as a 50/50 choil but without sacrificing any edge length. The edge length gain by itself isn't very significant but when combined with the handle design thing from #1 it's a combo that just simply works.
To further conversation on this one point, here are my three no-choil candidates.

Image

A Siren sitting on a Caribbean sitting on an Ulize.

The Ulize shows a mainly non-sharpening notch (like the Endura/Pacific Salt but smaller, and with the tiniest actual sharpening notch) when open, but its ricasso shortens up way more on closing. No drop-shut worries.

The Siren shows no notch when open (it does have a pronounced finger guard on its handle), but the ricasso does show when open before shortening up dramatically on closing. Still no drop-shut worries.

The Caribbean, as you well know, has an edge practically to the handle (whose finger-guard saves the day when open) but enough of the ricasso makes an appearance on closing also to save the day. So, no flick-shut worries IF you remember to keep an index finger high enough on the handle to meet the ricasso.

Curiously, grabbing forward of the finger-guard for fine work is much safer on the Siren than on the Caribbean because its ricasso shows just enough when open.

EDIT: In bold.
Last edited by wrdwrght on Tue Sep 08, 2020 7:26 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Cambertree
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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby Cambertree » Mon Sep 07, 2020 7:27 pm

I use my knives at work frequently.

Depending on the specific job I’m doing, the level of usage can vary from over a hundred times a day (when I’ve bothered to keep a tally), to a few dozen times. Of late, it’s probably more the latter.

Cutting tasks are usually cardboard, pallet strapping, plastic; and fruit and vegetables for lunch or dinner, while at work (after being cleaned with alcohol wipes, of course).

In truth, the Dragonfly and Urban do everything I need. Occasionally I might be better served with a slightly longer blade, as when slicing a bread roll or the like, but in those cases I just modify my technique. A longer blade would mean I would give up some of the nimbleness of the DF2 or Urban in tight spaces, like shelving, and that’s more important to me.

Also, I can use those two knives around anyone, and they rarely even notice.

I’ll also often use a straight bladed traditional like a Lambsfoot knife.

I used to tell myself I might need a longer bladed knife or a locking blade for emergencies, but in truth I just use those knives because I like to, not because I really need them for EDC.

At home, if I want a larger blade, or a particular shape of blade or SE, or a fixed blade or whatever, I just go get it, rather than having one on me.

If I’m out in the garden and yard, of course there’s a different array of knives I’ll select from, which are mostly SE Salts or the PE Caribbean.

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Bloke
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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby Bloke » Mon Sep 07, 2020 8:35 pm

I think practicality is paramount in an EDC knife. Cool and bling are … cool I s’pose.

My little Ladybug SE HB is the most practical knife I’ve owned to date, hands down. That said it does need to be sharp.

During the course of a typical day at work I’ll use it to open (push cut) a lens wipe satchel to clean my glasses and phone. To open (push cut) a satchel of porridge. In the closed position to open a tin of coffee. I use it as a fork for fruit salad and snacks like cheese, olives and crackers. Cut banding on boxed reams of printer paper. Open Stores packages and cut pallet banding and cable ties holding tags on machine components. Re-point a bamboo tooth pick. Cut different types of cordage and rope for sailors with blunt knives or no knives and I can’t walk past a cardboard box without cutting a piece off it just because I can. And the list goes on.

Outside of work. I’ll use it to discreetly cut a flower or two from neighbour’s front yards for beloved wife. Nothing comes close to freeing toys from cardboard backing for grandkiddies. I cut lemons and oranges from Mum and Dad’s trees when I visit. I use it to clean fish.

If that isn’t enough, I’ve never done anything at all to the little knife, no oil, no pivot adjustment, nothing other than wash it with dishwashing liquid once every blue moon or wipe it down with hand sanitiser of late.

If a more practical knife actually does exist in a similar diminutive package, I haven’t found. I’ve no doubt missed a hundred other things I use the little knife for and all I can really add is nothing cuts like a sharp Spyderco SE HB for my daily knife use.

In conclusion, Mr Glesser you’re a genius! :cool:
A day without laughter is a day wasted. ~ Charlie Chaplin

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standy99
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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby standy99 » Tue Sep 08, 2020 6:47 am

Probably ever knife I have would do for what I need doing. Cutting something.
Could probably survive with a Delica and a Fixed blade camp knife.

They all have the same function, they all have the same practicality.

But it’s fun having hundreds of different sizes, shapes and colours to play around with.

(Also I am thankful every day I’m in a position to spend money on these knives and I’m not a low paid farmer/worker in a land where a Spyderco is a week or twos wages)
Im a vegetarian as technically cows are made of grass and water.

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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby JD Spydo » Wed Sep 09, 2020 7:40 am

Bloke wrote:
Mon Sep 07, 2020 8:35 pm
I think practicality is paramount in an EDC knife. Cool and bling are … cool I s’pose.

My little Ladybug SE HB is the most practical knife I’ve owned to date, hands down. That said it does need to be sharp.

During the course of a typical day at work I’ll use it to open (push cut) a lens wipe satchel to clean my glasses and phone. To open (push cut) a satchel of porridge. In the closed position to open a tin of coffee. I use it as a fork for fruit salad and snacks like cheese, olives and crackers. Cut banding on boxed reams of printer paper. Open Stores packages and cut pallet banding and cable ties holding tags on machine components.

In conclusion, Mr Glesser you’re a genius! :cool:
Well BLOKE I always love your input. But there is no way in GOD's creation I could get by doing my daily chores with a "Ladybug" :rolleyes: But Brother if it works for you then more power to you. The Para2 would probably be about as small as I could get by with. But on the other hand all of us have a different work day in most cases.

Brother how are you going to take on those "Olive Pythons" and those lovely Salt Water Crocodiles with a Ladybug :eek: :eek:

You're a meaner and tougher man than I'll ever be if that's the case :D I can just see you grabbing one of those Emu birds by the neck with only a Ladybug to defend yourself with :cool:

But getting back down to earth>> hey if it works for you then you sure don't have much of a sharpening job at the end of the day :D

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Bloke
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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby Bloke » Wed Sep 09, 2020 4:43 pm

JD Spydo wrote:
Wed Sep 09, 2020 7:40 am
The Para2 would probably be about as small as I could get by with. But on the other hand all of us have a different work day in most cases.
Ah, hahaha! Joe, you're a funny man. :)

I could get by without carrying any knife at all at work but that wouldn't be too much fun. The little Ladybug though never ceases to amaze me and as I described above it performs all duties I require with ease and I've never found it wanting.

One major benefit is my coworkers don't bat an eyelid when they see it. We have regular communications meetings etc. with company directors visiting which are followed by catered lunches. After a recent meeting I used my little knife to stab blueberries which caught the eye of one of the department heads who asked to see the little knife. I complied and went on to tell him all about it. He was duly impressed until I told him how much they cost here. Ah, hahaha!

Anyhow, the point I'm trying to make is had I pulled out a beloved Military, I mightn't be looking for another job but I'd definitely have a lot of explaining to do. :rolleyes:
A day without laughter is a day wasted. ~ Charlie Chaplin

Sumdumguy
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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby Sumdumguy » Wed Sep 09, 2020 5:14 pm

It really depends on what type of EDW that you do. When I was doing physical labor, my EDC was the Caribbean.

Now that my pace is a lot slower, my EDC is a Micro Dyad. The Caribbean and Ulize act as accoutrement, whereas the MD is part of the outfit.

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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby JD Spydo » Fri Sep 11, 2020 7:18 am

Sumdumguy wrote:
Wed Sep 09, 2020 5:14 pm
It really depends on what type of EDW that you do. When I was doing physical labor, my EDC was the Caribbean.

Now that my pace is a lot slower, my EDC is a Micro Dyad. The Caribbean and Ulize act as accoutrement, whereas the MD is part of the outfit.
That's a great point because a guy doing office work for an insurance company or an engineering firm even here in the USA would have to explain why he's using a C-36 Military on that particular job.

However there are some Spyderco blades that for whatever reason just don't bother people for the most part. About 12 years ago I was taking a college course and we were in groups of 5 and were all doing a project in which we used scissors, small knives and other art tools. I used my blue PE Dodo one entire afternoon and never had anyone say anything. Actually two of the ladies asked me if they could use it.

But if you are in a job where you put on a suit & tie I would not recommend taking a Szabo Folder or a POLICE model. That would raise some eyebrows I'm sure.


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