Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

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JD Spydo
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Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby JD Spydo » Mon Sep 07, 2020 4:57 am

I just posted a reply in one Brother's thread concerning "EDC" i.e. everyday carry. The thread dealt with "warm vs cool" EDC.

The more I think about it the more I'm reminded of the importance of the practicality aspects of carrying a favorite Spyderco folder>> or even a nice fixed blade for that matter.

Too many times we get caught up on some of Spyderco's "cool looking" folders>> and I'm not knocking that because I do myself like many of Spyderco's cool looking folders and fixed blades.

But for working and everyday usage I'm starting to take a hard look at the "Practical Aspects" of EDC. Also I'm starting to narrow down what I feel is practical for EDC uses. Many people have commented that my M390 Military is a bit large for EDC>> however I actually find many practical uses for it>> and it's legal here in Missouri :)

I also carry an SE companion blade ( SE RESCUE and/or SE Hawkbill) and have carried one for some time now. In the past few years I find myself using SE almost as much as I use my PE Military model.

Let's talk about what you all deem as being practical and useful on an everyday basis>>> and why? Let's talk about how your EDC makes YOUR life easier? Also how much more difficult and inconvenient YOUR life would be if you couldn't carry your preferred folder or fixed blade in your daily routine.

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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby Wartstein » Mon Sep 07, 2020 6:07 am

What matters to me in a general EDC folder, ready and suited for any task that might appear. As you asked, from a practical point of view:

1.)Blade length / Edge length

Ideally I want an actual cutting edge (so not blade length!) of about 3.5". That´s what an Endura/Pac Salt offers. Anything shorter gets more and more less versatile without offering any benefit to me.
A long edge is better in so many scenarios: Cutting a loaf of bread when having lunch outdoors; Longer, more sweeping/slicing motions when whittling or cutting cardboard instead of having to more push the blade downwards; Being able to keep the pivot away from stuff that might gunk it up; More likely that a part of the blade will still be razor sharp after a lot of cutting; and so on.
And for real tip-work: No problem to choke up on the actual edge and for all who don´t like that: Pinch grip.

2.) Serrations
Discussed a lot lately: SE cuts a lot better in most and not worse in any of the tasks I come across than PE; Stays sharp a lot longer; is a bit quicker to touch up; Will still separate stuff even when dull (while PE is useless then); SE could probably even "cut" thick wire or something like this in an emergency (while PE could not)

3.) A bit stronger tip:
The a bit reenforced tip of let´s say the Endura (due to the slight drop towards the tip) gives me more confidence in "harder" tasks, where I have to work very quick and could hit metal or the like, while still being fine enough for things like removing ticks.

4.) Reasonable thin blade stock
If the tip is not too fine thinner blade stock just by physics slices better than thicker stock, if blade height, thickness behind the edge and edge angle are the same. The 3mm of the Endura for me are already on the thicker side, and I never ever came even close to break this knife, though I use it pretty hard.

So, from a practical point of view: I´d always carry one of my Enduras; and just as long as there is no ffg SE Endura / Pac Salt also my Endela SE cause it has, well, serrations (but an a bit short (pm2-ish) cutting edge)
Top three going by pocket-time: Endura 4 in VG 10/Micarta-scales; Stretch 1 in VG 10; Endura 4 in HAP 40

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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby JD Spydo » Mon Sep 07, 2020 9:57 am

Wartstein wrote:
Mon Sep 07, 2020 6:07 am
What matters to me in a general EDC folder, ready and suited for any task that might appear. As you asked, from a practical point of view:

1.)Blade length / Edge length

Ideally I want an actual cutting edge (so not blade length!) of about 3.5". That´s what an Endura/Pac Salt offers. Anything shorter gets more and more less versatile without offering any benefit to me.
A long edge is better in so many scenarios:

2.) Serrations
Discussed a lot lately: SE cuts a lot better in most and not worse in any of the tasks I come across than PE; Stays sharp a lot longer; is a bit quicker to touch up; Will still separate stuff even when dull (while PE is useless then); SE could probably even "cut" thick wire or something like this in an emergency (while PE could not)

So, from a practical point of view: I´d always carry one of my Enduras; and just as long as there is no ffg SE Endura / Pac Salt also my Endela SE cause it has, well, serrations (but an a bit short (pm2-ish) cutting edge)
Thanks for such a thorough and excellent reply Warstein :) You touched on several points that I completely agree with you on. You have really done your homework on what the ideal EDC should be comprised of.

I particularly like your comment on serrations. And it's making me take another hard look at EVIL D's challenge of carrying SE only. I'm to the point now if I'm stuck in the wilderness with one knife ( folder or fixed blade) I now wish it to be a really good serrated model. Your point on a plain edge being completely useless is a point I've believed in for quite some time now. That's one big reason that I feel having adequate sharpening equipment in a survival situation is just as important as the knife itself.

Your reply is so thorough I really don't see how anyone could improve on it ;) But I still want to hear from the rest of you anyway :D

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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby TomAiello » Mon Sep 07, 2020 10:26 am

I find that ease/speed of deployment and stowing are critical for me for EDC. If I have a knife I can't easily close one handed, I often find myself putting it down (open) while I finish a task, rather than re-stowing it. That's fine for construction or yard work tasks, but for things like breaking down boxes, I'll find myself putting the knife down on top of the trash can while I use the knife hand to open the recycle bin and put the (now flattened) box into it. I have yet to leave a knife sitting there when I walk back inside but I can definitely see the risk.

I used to think that 'less expensive and more replaceable' were important to me, but I've come to the conclusion that they are not. I'd certainly be unhappy if I broke or lost my 4v Manix, but I'd also be confident that Spyderco would have something else come down the line in the next year or so that would make a suitable replacement. And in the meantime I have so many good EDC knives that I'd just get to try more of them out.

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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby JTowns » Mon Sep 07, 2020 10:39 am

I know this is going to go counter to what a lot of people will say but what I carry mostly depends on my mood rather then practicality. I'm a correctional officer so I can't carry at work at all, so any knife I carry won't see legit work duty. Most times my knives are dedicated box openers or other small random tasks I may encounter in a day. That being the situation I like to carry the biggest most interesting knife I can carry comfortably depending on attire and environment. Personally anything from a YoJumbo to a Pochi will handle anything I need it to on a normal day for me, and hopefully one day I'll own both.
Current Collection: Para 3 LW, Manix 2 DLC, Amalgam, Tenacious, Resilience

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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby Naperville » Mon Sep 07, 2020 10:43 am

I love these Spyderco fixed blades, but they should be sold with kydex/boltaron and leather sheaths.

I know that the Province has boltaron sheaths available, but it is a hassle to then go buy one. I need to get one, but I'm thinking of ordering two as I want a second Province.

Also, there is no option for a boltaron sheath for my Sustain. So, there I need to have two of them made....because as with the Province, I expect to own two Sustain knives.

I'd be carrying these knives except for the fact that I don't have kydex/boltaron sheaths. Maybe I'll pull a Vivi and tie some cord to the leather sheaths. I really love these knives and plan to use them.
Spyderco Collection: Military (S110V), Bob Lum Darn Dao(CPM-154), Yojimbo 2 (1 in S30V & 2 in 20CV), Sustain(20CV), Native 5(Maxamet), Jumpmaster 2(H1), Province(4V). SHORT LIST: CF Shaman(S90V), Native Chief, Street Bowie(4V at 60+ HRC), Nightstick, Yojumbo.

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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby zuludelta » Mon Sep 07, 2020 10:50 am

I try to be as minimal as I can with what I carry outside of work. Before I got heavily into Spydercos, a Leatherman Skeletool CX was all I carried (I just find a basic set of pliers & drivers very handy to have).

The most minimal set-up I carry is keychain-based: a VG-10 Manbug in Spyder Edge & a Leatherman Style PS (a small, knifeless, pliers-based multitool). I carry this when every excess gram & cubic centimetre matters, such as when trail running.

Outside of that context, what I carry depends on what I expect to encounter on a particular day. If I think I'll need more cutting edge or tools, I scale up the knife and/or multitool & add things like a small penlight or a reliable pen.

In terms of folders, most days, I carry one of the following in lieu of—or in addition to—my serrated Manbug (in order of increasing size):
  • Dragonfly 2 Salt Spyder Edge
  • Native 5 Lightweight Combo Edge
  • Salt 2 Spyder Edge
  • Delica 4 Combo Edge
  • Introvert
  • Li'l Temperance 3
  • Yojimbo 2
  • Endura 4 Combo Edge
.
JD Spydo wrote:
Mon Sep 07, 2020 4:57 am
Let's talk about what you all deem as being practical and useful on an everyday basis>>> and why? Let's talk about how your EDC makes YOUR life easier?
As to how my EDC makes my day-to-day life easier... I think more than anything, it is the peace of mind that comes with having tools to "do stuff" that I find most helpful. And I don't mean just being prepared for emergencies (though I've used my EDC gear for that), but especially for mundane tasks & inconveniences, too: cutting loose threads on clothing, cutting zip-ties, opening packages, tightening loose screws, taking out splinters, picking up stuff in tight spaces you can't reach with your fingers, picking up stuff you don't want to touch with your bare hands, and general probing and poking and prodding.

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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby Evil D » Mon Sep 07, 2020 11:25 am

1. Neutral grip design. This has become a really important design aspect after carrying my Caribbean for so long now. I've realized that the idea of grip options is wasted on me, I need a grip that simply works the first time without any shimmying around or trying to get my hand lined up with finger grooves or choils, and that trip must work with and without gloves.

2. Blade ricasso/plunge line design (?). Not even sure what to call that, basically I want the edge as close to the handle as possible and I DO NOT want any sharpening choils or notches or whatever, I don't want anything but edge all the way up to the handle. This detail combined with #1 gives me a grip that positions my index finger right up at the edge just about the same as a 50/50 choil but without sacrificing any edge length. The edge length gain by itself isn't very significant but when combined with the handle design thing from #1 it's a combo that just simply works.

3. Blade shape and blade angle. I really prefer blades with shallow bellies and low tips in relation to the handle, and a bit of negative blade angle. The low tip and angle give me similar aggressive cutting power as a wharncliffe but the wee bit of belly makes for a bit more versatility than a true wharncliffe. Ideally I'd like enough negative angle combined with just enough belly to still be able to get the blade down onto a cutting board at/before my fingers hitting the board, not because I do a lot of food prep but because this tends to make the knife more versatile all around and makes for a more natural angle for your wrist if you're making cuts with the tip of the blade than for example a Lionspy that has all that belly at the tip of the blade.

4. Size. More so than blade length, I want a handle big enough for a full fisted grip (again, without the need for a finger choil) and then I want as much edge crammed into that handle size as physically possible. Because of my hand size that typically means the handle can accommodate something around a 3.5-4 inch blade most of the time which is perfect for me.

5. Lock design. This is a rather new detail I'm focusing on lately but it has more to do with ergonomics and hot spots than actual lock function. When I'm using a knife hard and for long periods of time the lock can become a hot spot, especially a compression lock. For that reason I think I'd like all of this in a back lock if possible because it puts the lock just far enough back behind the pivot so that area is nice and flat or rounded which is much easier on your palm than the half scale and lock cutout and lock tab of a compression lock. A CBBL could potentially work ergonomically but I'm not a fan of unlocking them in a hurry.

6. Edge. Gotta be full SE, the pattern has to start and end with a large serration, it needs to have a bit of PE at the tip even if it's only 1/4 inch.

7. Blade grind. Needs to be FFG and on the thin side. I've found that 3mm is a very nice sweet spot between beefy and slicey as long as the blade is ground thin at the edge.

8. Random construction preferences. If all that can be done on a back lock that also utilizes an internal stop pin that would be great, but preferably one that's just a pin going through the blade tang with the path of the pin cut out from the liners and not the other way around (I don't recall, I think maybe the Chaparral is like this?). I like the pocket clips that have the lanyard hole built into them for better packaging of the two and I think it just looks better than having a lanyard hole off to the side.
SHARPEN IT LIKE YOU LOVE IT, USE IT LIKE YOU HATE IT
~David

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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby JD Spydo » Mon Sep 07, 2020 11:43 am

Naperville wrote:
Mon Sep 07, 2020 10:43 am
I love these Spyderco fixed blades, but they should be sold with kydex/boltaron and leather sheaths.

I know that the Province has boltaron sheaths available, but it is a hassle to then go buy one. I need to get one, but I'm thinking of ordering two as I want a second Province.

Also, there is no option for a boltaron sheath for my Sustain. So, there I need to have two of them made....because as with the Province, I expect to own two Sustain knives.

I'd be carrying these knives except for the fact that I don't have kydex/boltaron sheaths. Maybe I'll pull a Vivi and tie some cord to the leather sheaths. I really love these knives and plan to use them.
I'm really glad you brought up the subject of "Sheaths". Because I'm hearing of more of more guys EDCing fixed blades and some of the sheaths I've seen and used don't seem to be ideal for EDC carry. Oh most of them are good for belt carry but not what I had in mind for an EDC set up >> that is if I were to EDC a fixed blade. I use a couple of fixed blades a lot but I've yet to commit to EDCing one.
But I've yet to find a sheath that I like any better than the TEK-LOK sheath that a couple of my TEMPERANCE 1 models came with>> and we're talking circa 2005. My late friend who EDCed his STREETBEAT model concocted his own "Ankle Sheath" and I'm not sure where he mail ordered that from>> I think he got it from Mike Sastre who used to post on this forum quite often. I'll have to ask his son the next time I see him. But it was a very cool set up and he could deploy that blade lightning fast.
Yeah fixed blade sheaths for EDC should be a thread all of it's own IMO.

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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby JD Spydo » Mon Sep 07, 2020 11:51 am

Evil D wrote:
Mon Sep 07, 2020 11:25 am
1. Neutral grip design. This has become a really important design aspect after carrying my Caribbean for so long now. I've realized that the idea of grip options is wasted on me, I need a grip that simply works the first time without any shimmying around or trying to get my hand lined up with finger grooves or choils, and that trip must work with and without gloves.

2. Blade ricasso/plunge line design (?). Not even sure what to call that, basically I want the edge as close to the handle as possible and I DO NOT want any sharpening choils or notches or whatever, I don't want anything but edge all the way up to the handle. This detail combined with #1 gives me a grip that positions my index finger right up at the edge just about the same as a 50/50 choil but without sacrificing any edge length. The edge length gain by itself isn't very significant but when combined with the handle design thing from #1 it's a combo that just simply works.

3. Blade shape and blade angle. I really prefer blades with shallow bellies and low tips in relation to the handle, and a bit of negative blade angle. The low tip and angle give me similar aggressive cutting power as a wharncliffe but the wee bit of belly makes for a bit more versatility than a true wharncliffe. Ideally I'd like enough negative angle combined with just enough belly to still be able to get the blade down onto a cutting board at/before my fingers hitting the board, not because I do a lot of food prep but because this tends to make the knife more versatile all around and makes for a more natural angle for your wrist if you're making cuts with the tip of the blade than for example a Lionspy that has all that belly at the tip of the blade.

4. Size. More so than blade length, I want a handle big enough for a full fisted grip (again, without the need for a finger choil) and then I want as much edge crammed into that handle size as physically possible. Because of my hand size that typically means the handle can accommodate something around a 3.5-4 inch blade most of the time which is perfect for me.

5. Lock design. This is a rather new detail I'm focusing on lately but it has more to do with ergonomics and hot spots than actual lock function. When I'm using a knife hard and for long periods of time the lock can become a hot spot, especially a compression lock. For that reason I think I'd like all of this in a back lock if possible because it puts the lock just far enough back behind the pivot so that area is nice and flat or rounded which is much easier on your palm than the half scale and lock cutout and lock tab of a compression lock. A CBBL could potentially work ergonomically but I'm not a fan of unlocking them in a hurry.

6. Edge. Gotta be full SE, the pattern has to start and end with a large serration, it needs to have a bit of PE at the tip even if it's only 1/4 inch.

7. Blade grind. Needs to be FFG and on the thin side. I've found that 3mm is a very nice sweet spot between beefy and slicey as long as the blade is ground thin at the edge.

8. Random construction preferences. If all that can be done on a back lock that also utilizes an internal stop pin that would be great, but preferably one that's just a pin going through the blade tang with the path of the pin cut out from the liners and not the other way around (I don't recall, I think maybe the Chaparral is like this?). I like the pocket clips that have the lanyard hole built into them for better packaging of the two and I think it just looks better than having a lanyard hole off to the side.
As detailed and thorough as your EDC preferences are listed I don't know where to begin. But I am dying to ask you how this upcoming C-60 Ayoob will rank along side of your ideal EDC preferences :D ???
But I will also say that your dare and/or challenge of EDCing a fully serrated blade is one I've been seriously taking a second look at recently.
The details that you and Warstein both shared with us should be in one of the major knife magazines. I thank both of you guys for your detailed list of EDC preferences :cool:

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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby JD Spydo » Mon Sep 07, 2020 11:58 am

zuludelta wrote:
Mon Sep 07, 2020 10:50 am
I try to be as minimal as I can with what I carry outside of work. Before I got heavily into Spydercos, a Leatherman Skeletool CX was all I carried (I just find a basic set of pliers & drivers very handy to have).

The most minimal set-up I carry is keychain-based: a VG-10 Manbug in Spyder Edge & a Leatherman Style PS (a small, knifeless, pliers-based multitool). I carry this when every excess gram & cubic centimetre matters, such as when trail running.

Outside of that context, what I carry depends on what I expect to encounter on a particular day. If I think I'll need more cutting edge or tools, I scale up the knife and/or multitool & add things like a small penlight or a reliable pen.
I want to thank you right off the bat "zuludelta" for your detailed regimen you find ideal. And I want to also thank you for bringing up "multi-tools" as part of an EDC regimen. I have a couple of Victorinox Swiss Tool multi-tools which are my favorites at this present time. However I usually only take a multi-tool along if I anticipate a really complex workday which would require a broad range of tools.

You pretty much lay that out in your third paragraph. For a long time I've wanted to see Spyderco try their luck at a more conventional type multi-tool. Now I was a big fan of the Spyderench but it's not often I carry that highly specialized multi-tool with me. Most of the time it's something like your Leatherman or one of the Victorinox Swiss Tools and at one time I had one of BUCK's multi-tools. Not sure who made those but they weren't bad.

I'm very pleased with the answers I've gotten from you guys so far :)

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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby Naperville » Mon Sep 07, 2020 12:01 pm

JD Spydo wrote:
Mon Sep 07, 2020 11:43 am
Naperville wrote:
Mon Sep 07, 2020 10:43 am
I love these Spyderco fixed blades, but they should be sold with kydex/boltaron and leather sheaths.

I know that the Province has boltaron sheaths available, but it is a hassle to then go buy one. I need to get one, but I'm thinking of ordering two as I want a second Province.

Also, there is no option for a boltaron sheath for my Sustain. So, there I need to have two of them made....because as with the Province, I expect to own two Sustain knives.

I'd be carrying these knives except for the fact that I don't have kydex/boltaron sheaths. Maybe I'll pull a Vivi and tie some cord to the leather sheaths. I really love these knives and plan to use them.
I'm really glad you brought up the subject of "Sheaths". Because I'm hearing of more of more guys EDCing fixed blades and some of the sheaths I've seen and used don't seem to be ideal for EDC carry. Oh most of them are good for belt carry but not what I had in mind for an EDC set up >> that is if I were to EDC a fixed blade. I use a couple of fixed blades a lot but I've yet to commit to EDCing one.

But I've yet to find a sheath that I like any better than the TEK-LOK sheath that a couple of my TEMPERANCE 1 models came with>> and we're talking circa 2005. My late friend who EDCed his STREETBEAT model concocted his own "Ankle Sheath" and I'm not sure where he mail ordered that from>> I think he got it from Mike Sastre who used to post on this forum quite often. I'll have to ask his son the next time I see him. But it was a very cool set up and he could deploy that blade lightning fast.

Yeah fixed blade sheaths for EDC should be a thread all of it's own IMO.
I DO have a boltaron sheath for my Jumpmaster II and I love it. That right there is ready to use right out of the box. It's my carry knife for the Winter.
Spyderco Collection: Military (S110V), Bob Lum Darn Dao(CPM-154), Yojimbo 2 (1 in S30V & 2 in 20CV), Sustain(20CV), Native 5(Maxamet), Jumpmaster 2(H1), Province(4V). SHORT LIST: CF Shaman(S90V), Native Chief, Street Bowie(4V at 60+ HRC), Nightstick, Yojumbo.

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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby soc_monki » Mon Sep 07, 2020 12:09 pm

I tend to only buy knives that are practical and carryable on a daily basis. Doesn't matter the brand, but I tend to stay with practical blade shapes (for me) like drop points, clip points, or modified wharncliff or sheepsfoot.

At least 3.25", up to 4". No limits in my state so I could go bigger but I think a 4" folder is plenty. My biggest being my 4max Scout which I do carry! Smallest knife is probably my para 3 or para 3 lw. If I need something heavy duty I have my Becker BK2, which I wouldn't edc but will take on hikes. Never know when you might need to fell a tree... Haha!

Generally I'll carry two folders. One bigger, more hard use (Shaman or Manix 2 xl maybe?) and one a little more precise (pm2 or para 3). That's not always the go to choices, but one brute, one svelte usually covers everything I need. If I need something to open a package or cut some food in public I can use the more "friendly" option.

I mean, I don't come upon hard use scenarios very often, but I prefer to be prepared. You never know what you might come upon in a normal day, or what kind of tool you might need!

Around the house I carry whatever I feel like. 2 knives, 3 knives, swap knives every 30 minutes? I enjoy all my knives and like to use ones I don't normally use often when I can!
Spyderco : Resilience, Tenacious, Persistence, Manix 2 G10, Para 3 G10, Para 3 LW, Paramilitary 2,
BBS Paramilitary 2, Amalgam, Native Chief, Blade HQ Manix 2 XL, Shaman, Gayle Bradley 2, DLC M4 Shaman
Kershaw : Tone, Thermite, Atmos, Natrix 7007cf, Natrix 7008cf, Bareknuckle 7777, Bareknuckle 20cv, Concierge, 7777CFM390 Bareknuckle
Zero Tolerance : 0566CF, 0770CF, 0770GRYBW, 0562CF, 0470, 0456CF, 0095BW, 0801TI
Ontario : Rat 1
CRKT : Caligo
Civivi : Plethiros, Baklash, Incite, Vexer
Cold Steel : AD10, 4Max Scout, SR1 Lite
Benchmade : 810-1401 Contego, 15080-2 Crooked River, 15080-Custom Crooked River, 560BK-1 Super Freek, 15085 Mini Crooked River, 15085-Custom Mini Crooked River, 940-2, 550-1 Griptilian, 950bk Rift, 940-1, Custom Sheepsfoot Griptilian
Buck : 110, Bucklite 422, 110 LT, 110 Slim Select, 112 Slim Pro, Custom 110, 1978-79 110
Artisan : Tradition
Hogue : Ritter RSK MK1-G2
Kabar : Becker BK2 Campanion
Hinderer : XM-18, XM-24

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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby Abyss_Fish » Mon Sep 07, 2020 12:11 pm

I’ve changed my edc a lot over the years. I sorta amend it as I go.

Started with a kershaw dividend because I simply wanted a thing that cut. It dulled constantly though and I found I wasn’t into assisted knives or flippers. Sooo on to the BM valet, which was fine but the pocket clip was awkward, the thumbstud was uncomfortable, and I had a lot of trouble with lifesharp. Sooooooooo I sold off absolutely all of my knives and bought a spydiechef. Comfortable, exactly big enough without being to bulky or spooky to random strangers, easy to maintain the steel, wonderful wonderful wonderful.

On my keys I started with one of those swisstool things that looks like a key, and opens into an uncomfortable knife. That thing survived multiple flights in my pocket, no idea how. Chucked that for an actual pocket knife. Originally I tied some paracord to my keys with a metal ring at the end, to make them easier to take out. I upgraded that to a tec accessories suspension clip. Then after that broke (twice) I upgraded to a lynch northwest clip. Added a leatherman style ps, cold steel charm upgraded to a k390 ladybug, added a metal toothpick.

Etc etc etc. I don’t know if I even have hard and fast rules about any of it, I simply improve as I find things that need improving. Although at this point most of my knife purchases are either upgrades to my current knives or sorta lateral moves. Functionality is always first however, I can mod in beauty :)
I require more lc200n and thinner grinds

Current collection: Watu, Spydiechef, Native G10 salt, Waterway, K390 Ladybug, Caribbean

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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby p_atrick » Mon Sep 07, 2020 12:28 pm

I don't do a lot of cutting on a day-to-day basis, so blade length or steel type don't really factor into the equation. For me, the ultimate EDC is the Sage 2 (sadly, local laws don't allow blades that long). Here's why I like it so much:
  • Comfort in hand - I want a knife that feel comfortable in hand. I also want to be able to get a full grip on the knife if the cutting task is a little more demanding. The Sage 2 passes this with flying colors. I can use a variety of grips and squeeze pretty hard without feeling any hot spots. There is even a bit of room to spare which really makes it comfortable which I appreciate (my hand just barely fits on my Urban which limits the number of grips that feel good).
  • Thin blade - I just do your basic slicing when I use my knife so a thin blade is always welcome.
  • "Smaller" blade - The people I am around on most days are not knife people, so I don't want to put them off with a larger blade that snaps out with authority in the blink of an eye. I want people to be comfortable with me carrying a knife. I used quotes around smaller because I worked with somebody who thought the Sage 2 was "big". Can't do anything about that, but you won't see me carrying my P4LW around co-workers should it become legal.
  • Looks - this is the least important quality. In fact, I really like the Seki FRN knives, and you can argue that they are not good looking at all. I just appreciate that the Sage 2 looks as good as it feels in my hand. Over time, snail trails will appear and give it a unique look.
This is an overly broad list of features that could apply to any number of knives. But, to me, its the Sage 2. I only carry an Urban because the Sage is just a little too long. I'm not looking to replace the Sage, its as good as it gets for me.

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Evil D
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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby Evil D » Mon Sep 07, 2020 2:32 pm

JD Spydo wrote:
Mon Sep 07, 2020 11:51 am
As detailed and thorough as your EDC preferences are listed I don't know where to begin. But I am dying to ask you how this upcoming C-60 Ayoob will rank along side of your ideal EDC preferences :D ???
But I will also say that your dare and/or challenge of EDCing a fully serrated blade is one I've been seriously taking a second look at recently.
The details that you and Warstein both shared with us should be in one of the major knife magazines. I thank both of you guys for your detailed list of EDC preferences :cool:



Well, I really think I've got my tastes fine tuned enough to know just from pics if a knife will work for me and I feel pretty confident about the Ayoob. I distinctly remember looking at the last sprint really confused about the design and I'm a little ashamed to admit I thought it was pretty dang ugly. Then I'm not sure exactly when it was but I remember looking up pics of it and it just clicked in my head and suddenly made a lot of sense ergonomically. The most interesting thing to me is how it has so much belly (something I typically do not like) but still manages to have possibly the lowest blade point of any Spyderco, yet still seems like it's usable on a cutting board. I'm not sure Mr. Ayoob was thinking about all that when designing it or if it's just another case of a self defense knife also working really well for general use (Yojimbo 2, PPT, Street Beat to name a few others). I do wish it had a bit less ricasso separating the handle from the edge but I'll try to live with it.
SHARPEN IT LIKE YOU LOVE IT, USE IT LIKE YOU HATE IT
~David

ladybug93
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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby ladybug93 » Mon Sep 07, 2020 2:35 pm

the manix is about the most useful blade shape for me. just a slight belly with a slight negative angle and it's almost as effective as a wharncliffe, but with more versatility, which makes it great for edc.
however, after spending the last four years in hawaii, i've also grown to love/need spyderedged salts, such as the pacific salt. it's a perfect knife for iwb carry. as such, i sleep with it, run with it, swim with it, and do pretty much everything else you can think of with it. it's maintence free and always ready for use and abuse. i find that very practical for edc.
as far as cool looking folders go, i really love my yojimbo. fortunately, it doesn't just look cool; it's also a very functional edc. the wharncliffe blade with its very acute tip and deep hollow grind work well for many tasks. i also appreciate the story and design history behind it. a highly functioning self-defense blade apparently makes for a great edc.
in an effort to combine these features, i recently purchased the sheepsfoot spyderedge caribbean. it's got the similar slight belly of the manix; the sheepsfoot that's still got enough of a usable point, the low-maintenance saltiness, slim profile, and serrations of the pacific salt; and the compression lock of the yojimbo all in one package. i wish it was all black like my pacific salt and i wish it had a tapered butt end like the manix, but those are compromises i was willing to deal with.
unfortunately, i might be dealing with a warranty issue on mine, but barring that, it seems like it might be the one knife i can carry in place of my normal manix/pac salt or yojimbo/pac salt pairings. i doubt it will ever fully replace the other knives, but it's a practical knife for every day carry and it's super comfortable in hand.

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tonijedi
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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby tonijedi » Mon Sep 07, 2020 2:54 pm

Lately I've been into minimalism and lightweight carry. I don't use my pocket knife as much as before, the PE Salt Dragonfly has been a great carry. Lightweight and comfortable.

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Wartstein
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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby Wartstein » Mon Sep 07, 2020 3:25 pm

ladybug93 wrote:
Mon Sep 07, 2020 2:35 pm
the manix is about the most useful blade shape for me. just a slight belly with a slight negative angle and it's almost as effective as a wharncliffe, but with more versatility, which makes it great for edc.
.........
in an effort to combine these features, i recently purchased the sheepsfoot spyderedge caribbean. it's got the similar slight belly of the manix; the sheepsfoot that's still got enough of a usable point, the low-maintenance saltiness, slim profile, and serrations of the pacific salt;...

...
A bit off topic but I´d have a question:

I totally agree that the Manix has one of the most useful blade shapes and is a great EDC knife (except for the short cutting edge).
But I don´t understand what you mean by "slight belly" and comparing it to a wharncliffe - ?!

A wharncliffe for me is defined by a totally straight edge with no belly at all.
The Manix on the other hand is all belly, its edge is a continuous curve from heel to tip and by that nothing like a wharncliffe...
What would be a lot more "wharncliffy" in my opinion is the Stretch: This knife actually has a very long, totally straight section in the edge that rises to a belly just quite close to the tip (btw a rather unique "edge shape" for Spyderco - many popular models (PM2...) have more or less that continous curve in the edge)
Top three going by pocket-time: Endura 4 in VG 10/Micarta-scales; Stretch 1 in VG 10; Endura 4 in HAP 40

ladybug93
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Re: Function & Practicality Aspects of EDC

Postby ladybug93 » Mon Sep 07, 2020 3:50 pm

Wartstein wrote:
Mon Sep 07, 2020 3:25 pm
ladybug93 wrote:
Mon Sep 07, 2020 2:35 pm
the manix is about the most useful blade shape for me. just a slight belly with a slight negative angle and it's almost as effective as a wharncliffe, but with more versatility, which makes it great for edc.
.........
in an effort to combine these features, i recently purchased the sheepsfoot spyderedge caribbean. it's got the similar slight belly of the manix; the sheepsfoot that's still got enough of a usable point, the low-maintenance saltiness, slim profile, and serrations of the pacific salt;...

...
A bit off topic but I´d have a question:

I totally agree that the Manix has one of the most useful blade shapes and is a great EDC knife (except for the short cutting edge).
But I don´t understand what you mean by "slight belly" and comparing it to a wharncliffe - ?!

A wharncliffe for me is defined by a totally straight edge with no belly at all.
The Manix on the other hand is all belly, its edge is a continuous curve from heel to tip and by that nothing like a wharncliffe...
What would be a lot more "wharncliffy" in my opinion is the Stretch: This knife actually has a very long, totally straight section in the edge that rises to a belly just quite close to the tip (btw a rather unique "edge shape" for Spyderco - many popular models (PM2...) have more or less that continous curve in the edge)
yes. i'm aware that a wharncliffe is completely straight and the manix has a continuous curve. however, the curve on the manix is fairly gradual. what i'm saying is that between the gentle curve and negative angle, it acts similarly to a wharncliffe with the tip being lower and the curve less likely to slide off of the work, but also has the versatility of a slight belly for slicing.


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