I Don't Get The "Spydie-Flick."

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Tucson Tom
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Re: I Don't Get The "Spydie-Flick."

Postby Tucson Tom » Sat Apr 11, 2020 9:26 am

I don't get the flick either, so don't feel bad. I fooled around trying it for a while and decided it wasn't for me. Thumb in the hole is bulletproof and serves all of my purposes. But I won't make it as one of the "cool kids". As for the whole "tactical" thing, they say your fine motor skills vanish under stress, so I'll stick with thumb deployment there, in principle anyway. In reality it is all mall-ninja stuff really. If you are serious, carry a fixed blade or a gun.

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Re: I Don't Get The "Spydie-Flick."

Postby bbturbodad » Sat Apr 11, 2020 9:52 am

At the risk of keeping this off topic, I'll share an experience I had with a Pit Bull attack that happened in front of my house because it might be useful if you ever find yourself in a similar situation.

I was working at my desk which faces a window to the street when I saw a Pit Bull jump out the window of a moving car and attack a Yorkshire Terrier that was being walked by my neighbor's daughter. I ran out and the Pit had the little dog in his mouth while the owner (of the Pit) was trying to get his dog off the smaller dog. I don't know where I heard this technique but if you "karate chop" a dog's hind legs where they connect to the torso they will release their bite. I was able to get behind the dog and deliver a double chop (both hands simultaneously) and the Pit instantly released the Yorkie and the owner was then able to restrain the Pit.

Luckily the Yorkie was wearing a denim jacket (yeah I know) and the Pit had locked onto the jacket and not the dog so the blood was that of the owner and the Yorkie only suffered minor injuries.

I had another incident where a friend I walking with was attacked and knocked down by a Doberman. A few stern kicks to the ribs and the dog retreated.

I didn't have a knife with me for either instance but I don't think it would have been used in either case.
-Turbo

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Accutron
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Re: I Don't Get The "Spydie-Flick."

Postby Accutron » Sat Apr 11, 2020 10:25 am

Spydieflicking absolutely does serve a practical purpose if you're left-handed and the knife's opening hole is partially occluded on the clip side (Spydiechef, Advocate, Slysz Bowie, Techno, etc.)

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Re: I Don't Get The "Spydie-Flick."

Postby 013 » Sat Apr 11, 2020 11:59 am

I can neither confirm nor deny Spydieflicking. I just want to point out that the Spydiehole was never intended for that operation. In my opinion, Spydieflicking is better suited to non-critical/non-tactical roles.
The sword the body wounds, sharp words the mind.
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Re: I Don't Get The "Spydie-Flick."

Postby foofie » Sat Apr 11, 2020 2:22 pm

I use the spydie-flick just when I reassemble and tune my knives. If I can spydieflick it - then the action is loose enough (assuming there is no play). I can't spydieflick consistently for the life of me.

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Re: I Don't Get The "Spydie-Flick."

Postby AHarbuck » Mon Apr 13, 2020 6:51 pm

I played around with it on my compression lock knives and became ok at it. I’ve come to feel that it can have a functional role. Often when I pull a knife out of my pocket the grip I then have is closer to that needed for a middle finger flick and after that less adjustment to get to the needed grip for cutting. In general I prefer the thumb roll because I like the idea and feel of positive control of something potentially dangerous, but there are times when the flick requires less grip changes from the initial pull to cutting. YMMV as always.

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SubMicron
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Re: I Don't Get The "Spydie-Flick."

Postby SubMicron » Tue Apr 14, 2020 12:23 pm

Here's how:

With an empty hand, go ahead and flick your middle finger. Do it. Obviously you're using your thumb to build pressure on your middle finger so it can flick. Now load up your middle finger on your thumb, like you're about to flick, and notice it's relationship to your index finger. Wherever your index finger points is the same line that your middle finger will want to travel during the flick.

All of this means that you only need to hold the knife correctly and the flick open will be natural. Now grab your knife and keep your finger out of the hole for a minute.
20200414_122917.jpg
Three points of contact with your hand need to be achieved:

Put your index finger at roughly a 45 degree angle under the pivot, roughly half way up your finger. This creates the correct angle and places the butt of the knife somewhere under where your pinky finger meets your hand. While pushing down on the side of the knife with your thumb, push up with your index finger and pinky knuckle. This pegs the knife in place. Straighten all of your fingers and keep the knife pegged in place. If you're grip is limp and loose, the knife can just launch out the front of your hand when you flick.

Now put your middle finger in the hole, maintain 3 points of pressure, keep all other fingers straight, don't get creative, just flick. Your middle finger will need to travel along the same line as your index finger. Dont chase the path of the thumb hole. Once in motion, the blade does not need your help as long as you've put enough energy into the blade. This has nothing to do with strength and is 100% technique.

You can try putting the tip of your fingernail into the hole or simply just the tip of your finger. On most models, the edge of the Spydie hole is designed to grab your skin a little. If you have skinny fingers dont put it so far in the hole that it gets stuck.

Once you get it figured out, the Spydie Flick is as natural as flicking your finger with an empty hand. Its exactly the same motion. I also find it to be more secure and more reliable than opening with the thumb.

The key to it, for me anyway, is the 3 point grip.

I can make the argument that of all the ways to flick a knife open, the middle finger is the safest and most reliable, at least for my hand.

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Re: I Don't Get The "Spydie-Flick."

Postby ladybug93 » Tue Apr 14, 2020 4:37 pm

when you spydie flick your knife, you are already gripping it with your thumb against your palm. all you have to do is close your hand around it and it falls into place with little to no fiddling.

Image

by contrast, when you thumb flick your knife, you thumb is completely off of the knife and your knife is precariously resting on your fingers in an unnatural position, often with the blade now facing you instead of away from you. you then have to fumble around to twist the knife to the proper grip position to wrap your hand around it.

Image

true, in a sd situation, it may make more sense to not flick your knife at all so that you can maintain the best possible control. however, i find no control issues at all with a spydie flick and the knife is quickly available to me with the least amount of movement.

it's not just for people that play with their knives as fidget toys. it's efficient and effective. those of you that are so dead set against it should try again and see if maybe you just needed a little more practice.

note: i did exaggerate the pause after opening in each gif to show the position of the knife in the hand. in real usage, that pause is not part of the equation.

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Re: I Don't Get The "Spydie-Flick."

Postby ladybug93 » Tue Apr 14, 2020 4:48 pm

SubMicron wrote:
Tue Apr 14, 2020 12:23 pm
Here's how:
sorry. didn't mean to step on your toes. we must've been working on our posts at the same time. at any rate, i hope between our posts, people can see what we're talking about. it's definitely better.

but, as i stated before, if it doesn't work for you, use whatever does. you don't have to undo decades of muscle memory. i did, however, learn a new way to tie my shoes after decades of tying them one way and i've used the new method ever since. i've probably saved minutes of my life over the last six years. you're never too old to learn something new.

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Re: I Don't Get The "Spydie-Flick."

Postby TkoK83Spy » Tue Apr 14, 2020 6:35 pm

Hahaha, it's not rocket science!! Stick the edge of the tip of your middle finger in the hole and give an emphatic "middle finger/flip someone off" and out comes the blade. Easiest method to open a Spyderco.
20 :spyder:'s in 11 different steels
2 - ZT's - 0460 and 0470
1 - Microtech Ultratech DE OTF
1 - Civivi Elementum

-Rick

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Re: I Don't Get The "Spydie-Flick."

Postby bagsnatcher » Tue Apr 14, 2020 9:27 pm

It's similar to indexing a mag for a quick mag change - pointer along the spine of the mag, tip of pointer finds the mag well and rests on the mag well lip, top of mag indexes in mag well, palm tilts upwards with forearm moving sideways and sending the mag home.

Now, for the spydie flick: index finger is aligned along the knife scale, pointing towards the sharp end, thumb is on the opposite scale pressing the knife against the index and the palm, effectively buttressing the knife along most of its handle; middle finger then indexes against the hole, and flicks the blade open, all while the index, thumb, and palm grasp the knife securely.

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Re: I Don't Get The "Spydie-Flick."

Postby TkoK83Spy » Tue Apr 14, 2020 9:32 pm

SubMicron wrote:
Tue Apr 14, 2020 12:23 pm
Here's how:

With an empty hand, go ahead and flick your middle finger. Do it. Obviously you're using your thumb to build pressure on your middle finger so it can flick. Now load up your middle finger on your thumb, like you're about to flick, and notice it's relationship to your index finger. Wherever your index finger points is the same line that your middle finger will want to travel during the flick.

All of this means that you only need to hold the knife correctly and the flick open will be natural. Now grab your knife and keep your finger out of the hole for a minute.

20200414_122917.jpg

Three points of contact with your hand need to be achieved:

Put your index finger at roughly a 45 degree angle under the pivot, roughly half way up your finger. This creates the correct angle and places the butt of the knife somewhere under where your pinky finger meets your hand. While pushing down on the side of the knife with your thumb, push up with your index finger and pinky knuckle. This pegs the knife in place. Straighten all of your fingers and keep the knife pegged in place. If you're grip is limp and loose, the knife can just launch out the front of your hand when you flick.

Now put your middle finger in the hole, maintain 3 points of pressure, keep all other fingers straight, don't get creative, just flick. Your middle finger will need to travel along the same line as your index finger. Dont chase the path of the thumb hole. Once in motion, the blade does not need your help as long as you've put enough energy into the blade. This has nothing to do with strength and is 100% technique.

You can try putting the tip of your fingernail into the hole or simply just the tip of your finger. On most models, the edge of the Spydie hole is designed to grab your skin a little. If you have skinny fingers dont put it so far in the hole that it gets stuck.

Once you get it figured out, the Spydie Flick is as natural as flicking your finger with an empty hand. Its exactly the same motion. I also find it to be more secure and more reliable than opening with the thumb.

The key to it, for me anyway, is the 3 point grip.

I can make the argument that of all the ways to flick a knife open, the middle finger is the safest and most reliable, at least for my hand.
This looks weird to me. Instead of having all your fingers extended outward, risking hitting the blade against those fingers...why wouldn't you have them around the handle, pressing against the pocket clip as added traction, for a better grip on the knife, as well as not having any fingers just awkwardly sticking out all over the place??

That looks like an easy way to send your knife flying.
20 :spyder:'s in 11 different steels
2 - ZT's - 0460 and 0470
1 - Microtech Ultratech DE OTF
1 - Civivi Elementum

-Rick

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Re: I Don't Get The "Spydie-Flick."

Postby ladybug93 » Tue Apr 14, 2020 9:46 pm

TkoK83Spy wrote:
Tue Apr 14, 2020 9:32 pm
SubMicron wrote:
Tue Apr 14, 2020 12:23 pm
Here's how:

With an empty hand, go ahead and flick your middle finger. Do it. Obviously you're using your thumb to build pressure on your middle finger so it can flick. Now load up your middle finger on your thumb, like you're about to flick, and notice it's relationship to your index finger. Wherever your index finger points is the same line that your middle finger will want to travel during the flick.

All of this means that you only need to hold the knife correctly and the flick open will be natural. Now grab your knife and keep your finger out of the hole for a minute.

20200414_122917.jpg

Three points of contact with your hand need to be achieved:

Put your index finger at roughly a 45 degree angle under the pivot, roughly half way up your finger. This creates the correct angle and places the butt of the knife somewhere under where your pinky finger meets your hand. While pushing down on the side of the knife with your thumb, push up with your index finger and pinky knuckle. This pegs the knife in place. Straighten all of your fingers and keep the knife pegged in place. If you're grip is limp and loose, the knife can just launch out the front of your hand when you flick.

Now put your middle finger in the hole, maintain 3 points of pressure, keep all other fingers straight, don't get creative, just flick. Your middle finger will need to travel along the same line as your index finger. Dont chase the path of the thumb hole. Once in motion, the blade does not need your help as long as you've put enough energy into the blade. This has nothing to do with strength and is 100% technique.

You can try putting the tip of your fingernail into the hole or simply just the tip of your finger. On most models, the edge of the Spydie hole is designed to grab your skin a little. If you have skinny fingers dont put it so far in the hole that it gets stuck.

Once you get it figured out, the Spydie Flick is as natural as flicking your finger with an empty hand. Its exactly the same motion. I also find it to be more secure and more reliable than opening with the thumb.

The key to it, for me anyway, is the 3 point grip.

I can make the argument that of all the ways to flick a knife open, the middle finger is the safest and most reliable, at least for my hand.
This looks weird to me. Instead of having all your fingers extended outward, risking hitting the blade against those fingers...why wouldn't you have them around the handle, pressing against the pocket clip as added traction, for a better grip on the knife, as well as not having any fingers just awkwardly sticking out all over the place??

That looks like an easy way to send your knife flying.
by sticking the fingers out, you are ready to grab the knife. it’s easy to pin the handle between the palm and thumb.

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Re: I Don't Get The "Spydie-Flick."

Postby BornIn1500 » Tue Apr 14, 2020 10:15 pm

TkoK83Spy wrote:
Tue Apr 14, 2020 9:32 pm
Instead of having all your fingers extended outward, risking hitting the blade against those fingers...why wouldn't you have them around the handle, pressing against the pocket clip as added traction, for a better grip on the knife, as well as not having any fingers just awkwardly sticking out all over the place??

That looks like an easy way to send your knife flying.
For me, there's no risk of hitting the blade against my fingers. I agree with them. Having your thumb pressing the handle against your palm during the middle finger flick is very secure. Depending on the model, for me the middle finger flick is more secure than cradling the handle with my fingers and trying to get a little grip on the clip with my fingertips while flicking with my thumb. Both ways are secure enough, though.

In the end, I think the smaller the knife is, the more the middle finger flick out-shines the thumb flick.

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SubMicron
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Re: I Don't Get The "Spydie-Flick."

Postby SubMicron » Tue Apr 14, 2020 10:50 pm

TkoK83Spy wrote:
Tue Apr 14, 2020 9:32 pm
SubMicron wrote:
Tue Apr 14, 2020 12:23 pm
Here's how:

20200414_122917.jpg
This looks weird to me. Instead of having all your fingers extended outward, risking hitting the blade against those fingers...why wouldn't you have them around the handle, pressing against the pocket clip as added traction, for a better grip on the knife, as well as not having any fingers just awkwardly sticking out all over the place??

That looks like an easy way to send your knife flying.
It seems counterintuitive, and gripping it how you said is how I first started, however that grip offers the least purchase on the knife.

By clinging to the pocket clip for purchase, such as with a thumb flip, you're actually precariously balancing the knife in your hand. This becomes more evident on knives that arent as tall. The Smock for example, since I just set that down to type this. A short knife or small knife can rock in your hand which can be dangerous. Additionally you're often putting your knuckles in the path of the blade. Taller knives like a Manix resolve these issues however the final nail in the coffin is simply the mechanics of a human hand versus the mechanics of a folding knife

Close your pinky and ring finger into your hand and then try to flick your middle finger off your thumb. Its certainly possible for most people but its more awkward. Now try a flick with your whole hand open and you'll probably see the difference. It's easier to load your middle finger on your thumb and flick with an open hand.

By using your thumb to press the knife against your index finger and your pinky knuckle, it stabilizes the knife. With slight pressure it cant rock or move. By keeping your fingers open, you keep them away from the blade path, and play into the natural ergonomics of your hand while flicking it open.

Put some tape on the blade and practice. There's one way to learn how to ride a bike.

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TkoK83Spy
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Re: I Don't Get The "Spydie-Flick."

Postby TkoK83Spy » Wed Apr 15, 2020 8:07 am

I'm by no means an flicking fidgeter, I just find the way I do it to be the easiest way to open any Spyderco. I'm not trying to master flicking.
20 :spyder:'s in 11 different steels
2 - ZT's - 0460 and 0470
1 - Microtech Ultratech DE OTF
1 - Civivi Elementum

-Rick

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Re: I Don't Get The "Spydie-Flick."

Postby SubMicron » Wed Apr 15, 2020 10:19 am

TkoK83Spy wrote:
Wed Apr 15, 2020 8:07 am
I'm by no means an flicking fidgeter, I just find the way I do it to be the easiest way to open any Spyderco. I'm not trying to master flicking.
The easiest way is always the best way.


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