Taking apart knives

Discuss Spyderco's products and history.
User avatar
bearfacedkiller
Member
Posts: 10475
Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2014 1:22 pm
Location: hiding in the woods...

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby bearfacedkiller » Thu Feb 22, 2018 8:37 pm

Disassembling a knife and then returning it is unethical. In this day and age of customer service most people expect a no questions asked return policy and not much else. Sadly that it what good CS has devolved into for many. Unfortunately many feel entitled and will rationalize this behavior. In my opinion it is theft. I am not sure how to address this as the big retailers are going to continue with their no questions asked return policies.

As far as dissassembling goes I do not understand why it is neccesary. I do it and will admit to it but I will never say it is a neccesity. I don't rebuild ratchets, circular saws and other tools I have. I disassemble my knives because I like to tinker. I find it odd when folks say it is unquestionably needed. I field dressed a deer with a Swiss Army Knife over twenty years ago and all it got was a wash in the kitchen sink and it is still working just fine to this day. I also have other pinned slipjoints that I have had for twenty plus years that work great without ever being disassembled. They have seen a lot of use as they were from before I became a knife hoarder. If someone wants to make a case that they should be able to take a knife apart because it is theirs and they want to I can see that but the claim that it is somehow imperative to the longevity and proper functioning of the knife I am not buying it. Many, many old slipjoints as old as 100 years old are still chugging along just fine. We need to acknowledge that for many many years nobody took their knives apart and that the obsession with disassembly is a modern thing.
Last edited by bearfacedkiller on Thu Feb 22, 2018 8:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
-Darby
sal wrote:Knife afi's are pretty far out, steel junky's more so, but "edge junky's" are just nuts. :p
SpyderEdgeForever wrote: Also, do you think a kangaroo would eat a bowl of spagetti with sauce if someone offered it to them?

User avatar
NickShabazz
Member
Posts: 253
Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2016 8:48 am
Contact:

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby NickShabazz » Thu Feb 22, 2018 8:39 pm

Nate wrote: I don't get it and it seems fairly irresponsible to me to promote the disassembly of products the manufacturer doesn't intend to be taken apart to every random dude (or lady) who comes across your channel. Respectably, of course, but that's my $0.02.
I hear what you're saying, but from my perspective, when I didn't have these videos, people regularly asked for them, and people are going to do it anyways, once they manage to dunk their knife in a silty creek or their kid spills Apple Juice into their nice bearing action. So, as is the way with most things in life, I think it's better to show how to do it safely and without hurting anything, then to say "just don't do it" and expect people to listen.

Also, for what it's worth, I object to the idea that these simple tools should be "not intended to be taken apart". In my opinion, a knife that cannot be stripped and maintained by a skilled user without damage is a lesser tool compared to one that can be. Sure, you can probably make it work OK without completely stripping it down, but why wouldn't you buy a tool that's more robust and serviceable if given the choice. Again, what do I know, just some random jack-person, but I do truly believe that ease of and ability to service a tool is part of what makes it great, and is a wonderful feature that modern knives have to offer over traditional pinned construction.
Mourning the Slysz Bowie and loving the rest of Spyderco's gems. Check out my reviews at https://www.youtube.com/c/nickshabazz!

zhyla
Member
Posts: 1687
Joined: Tue Apr 20, 2010 2:12 pm

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby zhyla » Thu Feb 22, 2018 9:02 pm

NickShabazz wrote:
I hear what you're saying, but from my perspective, when I didn't have these videos, people regularly asked for them, and people are going to do it anyways, once they manage to dunk their knife in a silty creek or their kid spills Apple Juice into their nice bearing action. So, as is the way with most things in life, I think it's better to show how to do it safely and without hurting anything, then to say "just don't do it" and expect people to listen.

Also, for what it's worth, I object to the idea that these simple tools should be "not intended to be taken apart". In my opinion, a knife that cannot be stripped and maintained by a skilled user without damage is a lesser tool compared to one that can be. Sure, you can probably make it work OK without completely stripping it down, but why wouldn't you buy a tool that's more robust and serviceable if given the choice. Again, what do I know, just some random jack-person, but I do truly believe that ease of and ability to service a tool is part of what makes it great, and is a wonderful feature that modern knives have to offer over traditional pinned construction.
I agree in general, but I think some knives are meant more as fancy feats of engineering more than as “simple tools”. I wouldn’t wrench on [fancy supercar] like I will on my econobox... because you shouldn’t.

For the most part Spyderco knives are tools and not art, but that line is indeed blurring. I don’t fault Spyderco for their policies but if they try to prevent disassembly, there’s other fish in the sea.

Nate
Member
Posts: 1790
Joined: Sat Apr 13, 2013 11:25 am
Location: Hurtling through space...

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby Nate » Thu Feb 22, 2018 9:15 pm

NickShabazz wrote:
I hear what you're saying, but...

Also, for what it's worth, I object to the idea that these simple tools should be "not intended to be taken apart". In my opinion, a knife that cannot be stripped and maintained by a skilled user...
We're good man, a like your vids too ;) and agree that you can't stop information anymore, but I had to advocate for the unintended consequences on Spyderco here, as it sounds like serious deal for them. Thanks in advance for saying something about the returns.

In skilled hands they should be simple tools. Unfortunately it sounds like many unskilled hands and not much luck with the honor system for Spyderco. :(

Also, I feel the enormity of the Spyderco catalog is often heavily discounted in these discussions. What are the downstream effects of this stuff? User serviced? Parts? I mean I'm sure they have a system in place for w&r, replacements but it's limited and after that you get credit. Think about how many models are added or cut in any given year. What about 5yrs from now??? :eek:

Certainly everone has to adjust and adapt to survive I guess. I'm sure it will all be carefully considered.
Last edited by Nate on Thu Feb 22, 2018 9:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
:spyder:

User avatar
anycal
Member
Posts: 1705
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2017 12:40 pm
Location: California

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby anycal » Thu Feb 22, 2018 9:19 pm

This has been a good discussion. Brainstorming, suggestions, opinions, and civil. Hopefully it will provide some ideas to :spyder: .

For some of us, taking things apart is what we do. Knife is no different. Not just for the sake of maintenance or tinkering, but to have a reliable tool, to prolong its life, to understand the mechanics and design in case you need to something in the field, to learn new things. To build (or rebuild) your own, because you are 'I pack my own chute' type of person. I too would enjoy a kit. And huge RC fan here.

And I already had a couple of IPAs catching up on this read... Anyways, you're great.
Peter

Daveho
Member
Posts: 1260
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2018 9:19 pm

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby Daveho » Thu Feb 22, 2018 9:35 pm

I wonder what the break up is of users v collectors.
Since replacing the races my mantra is much better, not as good as the cutjack but it is still a new knife, break in may have me eating my words.
I fully support the idea of if you disassembled it and broke/lost/dropped in the river then yes it’s yours but as a show of faith in the product if the knife isn’t damaged by the user but was disassembled then your warranty should remain in effect.

User avatar
MichaelScott
Member
Posts: 3008
Joined: Mon Apr 13, 2015 11:42 am
Location: Southern Colorado

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby MichaelScott » Thu Feb 22, 2018 9:53 pm

Daveho wrote: I fully support the idea of if you disassembled it and broke/lost/dropped in the river then yes it’s yours but as a show of faith in the product if the knife isn’t damaged by the user but was disassembled then your warranty should remain in effect.
Yeah, I know. I’m repeating myself, but sometimes that’s what it takes.

Read. The. Warranty.
Overheard at the end of the ice age, “We’ve been having such unnatural weather.”

http://acehotel.blog

Team Innovation

Daveho
Member
Posts: 1260
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2018 9:19 pm

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby Daveho » Thu Feb 22, 2018 10:00 pm

MichaelScott wrote:
Daveho wrote: I fully support the idea of if you disassembled it and broke/lost/dropped in the river then yes it’s yours but as a show of faith in the product if the knife isn’t damaged by the user but was disassembled then your warranty should remain in effect.
Yeah, I know. I’m repeating myself, but sometimes that’s what it takes.

Read. The. Warranty.
Just because it’s written down dosnt mean it’s reasonable in all circumstances, I understand you don’t agree and that’s fine however clearly it’s something some spyderco fans would like to see done so we are discussing it.
Please.calm.yourself

User avatar
RamZar
Member
Posts: 1947
Joined: Mon Aug 12, 2013 12:44 am
Location: SoCal, USA

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby RamZar » Thu Feb 22, 2018 10:02 pm

I'm curious to know what percentage of knives returned to Spyderco by their dealers have been tampered with?

Some of what has been advocated in this thread is contrary to the changes in loctite and warranty policies mentioned in this other thread: //forum.spyderco.com/viewto ... =2&t=74060

Personally, I'm not in the habit of disassembling knives unless absolutely necessary. I know there are some who do it to all their knives as soon as they get them and later try to sell them as new or "like" new.

If I lose a screw or bend a clip I'd like to be able to get a replacement for them for free or a reasonable price depending on the material. Most issues are resolved by tightening/adjusting screws. Proprietary screws and red loctite are not good solutions and something many will stay away from.

If it's a new knife from a dealer and it's out of spec or personal desire (say a soft detent) it goes back to the dealer for a replacement or refund. I do not deal with dealers who have any ridiculous restocking fees. Most dealers even pay for return shipping for the defective product but not if it's something you don't like and there a nominal charge to cover their shipping to you in the first place. I don't like dealers who put returned products back on the shelf without much inspection. This is a source of frustration for both customers and manufacturers.

If you tinker/fiddle endlessly with your new knife and/or disassemble it's no longer new and should not be returned to the dealer and instead to the manufacturer for repair (under warranty or not depending on the knife manufacturer). Habitual tinkerers/fiddlers are a menace in many industries. If you don't know something say so and ask for guidance.
Last edited by RamZar on Thu Feb 22, 2018 11:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  • I welcome dialog, as long as it remains cordial, constructive and is conducted in a civilized manner. - Titanic: Blood & Steel
  • You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time, but you cannot fool all of the people all of the time. - Abraham Lincoln

Nate
Member
Posts: 1790
Joined: Sat Apr 13, 2013 11:25 am
Location: Hurtling through space...

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby Nate » Thu Feb 22, 2018 10:58 pm

Daveho wrote:
Daveho wrote: I fully support the idea of if you disassembled it and broke/lost/dropped in the river then yes it’s yours but as a show of faith in the product if the knife isn’t damaged by the user but was disassembled then your warranty should remain in effect.
Just because it’s written down dosnt mean it’s reasonable in all circumstances, I understand you don’t agree and that’s fine however clearly it’s something some spyderco fans would like to see done so we are discussing it.
Please.calm.yourself
I think he was mainly trying to say that the bolded part is their policy.

Take the bearings though, if they can be damaged by overtightening, how can Spyderco know if the problem came from the factory or was caused by the user when it comes in, if they can tell it's been disassembled and reassembled already? It may be tough to know for certain, but iirc, with the Advocate it was noted that they could tell the knives had been disassembled with virtually all of the returns. Of course, probably everyone claims they didn't do it and I'm sure at least a few of them are telling the truth...

This is all weird to me. I guess I've been lucky or something because I've never returned a Spyderco and never had any reason to contact w&r. I also generally expect a break-in period on new knives and don't need to adjust my pivots. Most of them will only see the torx driver once to move the clip.
Last edited by Nate on Thu Feb 22, 2018 10:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
:spyder:

Canazes9
Member
Posts: 253
Joined: Sun Jul 30, 2017 1:57 pm

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby Canazes9 » Thu Feb 22, 2018 10:58 pm

MichaelScott wrote:
zhyla wrote:Why are people taking Spyderco knives apart and then returning them? I think that's worth thinking about. Were they too tight? Gritty?

I'll admit, a certain fraction of consumers are just jerks, they'll take something apart, break it, and return it. That's just the reality of consumer goods. But if you've got customers trying to solve problems themselves with a torx driver on a brand new Spyderco it may be worth finding out why. Maybe some kind of survey?

Not everyone is going to send their knife to CS.
You don’t know why others are disassembling their knives. They may not know themselves. And, that is not the point. If they think there is a problem the remedy is, clearly stated in the warranty document present in each knife box, to send it in for evaluation by people who know what they are doing.

A survey of knife owners to diagnose potential defects would be worse than useless. They, by and large, aren’t qualified and that would only encourage some to take theirs apart.
You're projecting.

David

Canazes9
Member
Posts: 253
Joined: Sun Jul 30, 2017 1:57 pm

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby Canazes9 » Thu Feb 22, 2018 11:09 pm

Didn't read all the responses.

Spyderco you're staking out a position next to Benchmade on how you treat your customers - think carefully about that.

I really don't care how inept some bozo is that disassembles his knife and puts it together wrong, You're punishing me for that.

Maybe you should focus a spotlight where it needs to shine - dealers that take jacked up knives as new and expect you to fix them. Tell them no - it's part of the the new MAP pricing strategy, this is there part.

Despite my lust for a new Advocate and an Amalgam, count me out if I can't buy replacement drop in parts.

I'm way too fricking old to put up with having my recess taken away because a few kids were acting up in class.

David

Canazes9
Member
Posts: 253
Joined: Sun Jul 30, 2017 1:57 pm

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby Canazes9 » Thu Feb 22, 2018 11:13 pm

Nate wrote:
Daveho wrote:
Daveho wrote: I fully support the idea of if you disassembled it and broke/lost/dropped in the river then yes it’s yours but as a show of faith in the product if the knife isn’t damaged by the user but was disassembled then your warranty should remain in effect.
Just because it’s written down dosnt mean it’s reasonable in all circumstances, I understand you don’t agree and that’s fine however clearly it’s something some spyderco fans would like to see done so we are discussing it.
Please.calm.yourself
I think he was mainly trying to say that the bolded part is their policy.

Take the bearings though, if they can be damaged by overtightening, how can Spyderco know if the problem came from the factory or was caused by the user when it comes in, if they can tell it's been disassembled and reassembled already? It may be tough to know for certain, but iirc, with the Advocate it was noted that they could tell the knives had been disassembled with virtually all of the returns. Of course, probably everyone claims they didn't do it and I'm sure at least a few of them are telling the truth...

This is all weird to me. I guess I've been lucky or something because I've never returned a Spyderco and never had any reason to contact w&r. I also generally expect a break-in period on new knives and don't need to adjust my pivots. Most of them will only see the torx driver once to move the clip.
Spyderco knows the bearings they put in these knives were weak junk. Because the parts are garbage, they can't tell if the problem is due to garbage parts or slight over tightening - solution? Don't put weak, junk parts in your knives. When you realize your knives aren't up to standard, recall them and repair or replace - don't keep selling the same garbage.

David

User avatar
embry386
Member
Posts: 339
Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2017 10:17 pm

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby embry386 » Thu Feb 22, 2018 11:14 pm

If Spyderco starts pinning all their knives or otherwise making them impossible to disassemble, I'll be buying a lot fewer Spydies. Most of the fun of this hobby, for me, comes from mixing and matching scales and blades (and RIT dyeing, and eventually ordering custom scales made out of computer motherboards and all kinds of other cool things, hopefully) to get the exact combination I have in mind. I'd be sad to see that go away.

Perhaps something should be done to encourage the store the customer returns the badly-reassembled knife to, to check the knife more closely before accepting it and granting the refund? For example, when the second customer contacts Spyderco all like "hey, I bought this new knife from you and it's not working right, fix it" and you realize that the knife has been disassembled before and that that's what's causing the issues, return the knife to that customer and tell them "I'm sorry, we can't help you, someone screwed up this knife, and you bought it thinking it was new but it's not, go complain to the store that sold it to you for selling it under false pretenses and ask for a refund" -- I bet if that policy was followed, pretty soon all the knife stores would be more careful about checking to see if customers have screwed with the products before taking the item back.

It's the same sort of problem that's going on with all the fake Spydies out there; person buys genuine Spydie, person sticks fake Spydie in box from new genuine Spydie, customer sends it off as a "return" -- and this sort of thing is not really Spyderco's job to try and fix; it's the job of the retailer to watch out for this kind of thing.

I also like what DougC-3 has said:
It's appalling to me that so many people don't have the integrity to take the responsibility for their own actions when they disassemble a knife. If a buyer wants to take it apart, fine, it's your property, nobody can stop you -- just don't expect someone to bail you out for free if you screw up. Try taking apart your car engine or wrist watch and expecting the dealer or manufacturer to straighten it out for you. I think dealers should make it clear that they won't accept returned knives that have been disassembled and then reject any return that shows signs of it. They'd be better off without customers like that anyway, along with shoplifters.
And what anycal said:
Restocking fees to discourage returning of a knife. Obviously, no charge if there is an actual issue. Better assessment of returned knives by the dealer before they get put on a shelf - paid for by restocking fees.
And NickShabazz:
And of course, given that many other makers have unrestrictive warranties and reasonably-locked-tite screws and have stayed in business despite using them, there must be another solution.
And with this part of what Canazes9 said:
Maybe you should focus a spotlight where it needs to shine - dealers that take jacked up knives as new and expect you to fix them. Tell them no - it's part of the the new MAP pricing strategy, this is there part.
And ross8425:
It sounds like the start of the problem (other than the obvious disassembly by someone who is incompetent) is the dealers blindly accepting returned items without inspecting them.

Wouldn't it be considered theft to return an item for a full refund that was used? Pretty sure theft would be considered illegal.

The dealers need to tighten up their return policy in my eyes. I have taken apart a bunch of knives - never once did I return one or send it in for warranty work. I know the ability of what I can and can't do. If I broke it, I broke it. It is my fault, no one else.
I hope the problem can be resolved in a way that still lets me enjoy my knives the way I do best -- by disassembling and customizing them with cool swapped-out or aftermarket scales.

Nate
Member
Posts: 1790
Joined: Sat Apr 13, 2013 11:25 am
Location: Hurtling through space...

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby Nate » Fri Feb 23, 2018 12:03 am

Canazes9 wrote: Spyderco knows the bearings they put in these knives were weak junk. Because the parts are garbage, they can't tell if the problem is due to garbage parts or slight over tightening - solution? Don't put weak, junk parts in your knives. When you realize your knives aren't up to standard, recall them and repair or replace - don't keep selling the same garbage.

David
My intent to the person I adressed was about how having a policy that permits disassembly can make it more difficult to know what's happening, but then I drifted from an example to a generalization that maybe didn't work well. With the bearings though, Spyderco did annouce suspending production and redesigns, which they appear to be implementing.

Sorry they didn't meet your standard of ceasing all flipper model sales and recalling product? I don't pretend to know enough about the issue to determine if that level of reaction is warranted or not. What percentage of buyers are dissatisfied? I don't know. Afaik though, anyone who has a bearing flipper they aren't satisfied with can return it to Spyderco. Apart from the impact of shipping, which is a greater burden for overseas buyers, is there evidence of warranty coverage being denied on these models since the announcements were made?
:spyder:

Canazes9
Member
Posts: 253
Joined: Sun Jul 30, 2017 1:57 pm

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby Canazes9 » Fri Feb 23, 2018 12:30 am

Nate wrote:
Canazes9 wrote: Spyderco knows the bearings they put in these knives were weak junk. Because the parts are garbage, they can't tell if the problem is due to garbage parts or slight over tightening - solution? Don't put weak, junk parts in your knives. When you realize your knives aren't up to standard, recall them and repair or replace - don't keep selling the same garbage.

David
My intent to the person I adressed was about how having a policy that permits disassembly can make it more difficult to know what's happening, but then I drifted from an example to a generalization that maybe didn't work well. With the bearings though, Spyderco did annouce suspending production and redesigns, which they appear to be implementing.

Sorry they didn't meet your standard of ceasing all flipper model sales and recalling product? I don't pretend to know enough about the issue to determine if that level of reaction is warranted or not. What percentage of buyers are dissatisfied? I don't know. Afaik though, anyone who has a bearing flipper they aren't satisfied with can return it to Spyderco. Apart from the impact of shipping, which is a greater burden for overseas buyers, is there evidence of warranty coverage being denied on these models since the announcements were made?
Fairly common around the world for folks to be able to expect to be able parts for things they buy. Americans have become a little more complacent, in no small part due to more reliable delivery systems. Lots of people, lot of places all over the world - Spyderco's refusal to provide parts makes no sense - they can buy parts for everything. Why would they need to check Spyderco's warranty policy? When you buy a new car you know you will be able to buy brake pads right?

What if you were laughed at? Your car was made in Australia, that's not how we do it here, you have to return your car and we'll install new pad s for free (maybe). Would you say "silly me! Why didn't I check that policy before I purchased?" Or would you feel like you were being screwed and that Spyderco er, I mean Australian motors needed to conform to the way we do business in the US if they wanted to sell products here?

On the flipper issue:

Spyderco's bearing / washer system isn't so crappy that every model fails or even anything as silly as most of them fail. But far too many of them fail. Over and over.

And Spyderco's story is consistent "It's not our fault, the bearing system performs exactly as designed. If you want us to do anything, send in $20 with your knife to cover replacement parts for your knife (which we won't sell to you, only install w/o discussion for a $20 charge." And we don't need to look at your knife first - we know, it's your fault!

Let's see what Sal has to say about the bearing problem early in 2017:

Image

All the CQI improvements (sic) have been pushed through, yet the same crap knives that didn't sell are still languishing on dealers shelves to bust the odd mildly uninterested knife enthusiasts that see "Spyderco" on the box and think their purchases are safe.

David

User avatar
ChrisinHove
Member
Posts: 2949
Joined: Tue Dec 17, 2013 8:12 am
Location: 27.2046° N, 77.4977° E

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby ChrisinHove » Fri Feb 23, 2018 1:15 am

You used to be able to buy re-build kits for the Endura & Delica.

I would guess that they were discontinued because few people needed to tinker with a proper user, and so they didn't sell well.

All things considered, I would go down the line of top quality fasteners, with a soft paint finish. Folks can then disassemble their knife and their warranty if they choose, but won't be able to hide it.

Specific problem related items (i.e. bearings) should be sold on an "at your own risk" basis if the owners insist on not returning them for factory repair.

User avatar
standy99
Member
Posts: 1041
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 11:07 am
Location: Between Broome and Cairns somewhere

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby standy99 » Fri Feb 23, 2018 1:42 am

Just send a fixed blade credit to all the people that return a knife they have pulled apart. :D :D

Having a mate who is a rep for a large fishing reel company knives are not the only commodity that this is a problem.

One thing I will point out is having the multi clip points actually lulls people into pulling a knife apart. Just saying
Im a vegetarian as technically cows are made of grass and water.

User avatar
Larry_Mott
Member
Posts: 2359
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2015 5:00 am
Location: Helsingborg, Sweden

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby Larry_Mott » Fri Feb 23, 2018 1:50 am

bearfacedkiller wrote:Disassembling a knife and then returning it is unethical. In this day and age of customer service most people expect a no questions asked return policy and not much else. Sadly that it what good CS has devolved into for many. Unfortunately many feel entitled and will rationalize this behavior. In my opinion it is theft. I am not sure how to address this as the big retailers are going to continue with their no questions asked return policies.

As far as dissassembling goes I do not understand why it is neccesary. I do it and will admit to it but I will never say it is a neccesity. I don't rebuild ratchets, circular saws and other tools I have. I disassemble my knives because I like to tinker. I find it odd when folks say it is unquestionably needed. I field dressed a deer with a Swiss Army Knife over twenty years ago and all it got was a wash in the kitchen sink and it is still working just fine to this day. I also have other pinned slipjoints that I have had for twenty plus years that work great without ever being disassembled. They have seen a lot of use as they were from before I became a knife hoarder. If someone wants to make a case that they should be able to take a knife apart because it is theirs and they want to I can see that but the claim that it is somehow imperative to the longevity and proper functioning of the knife I am not buying it. Many, many old slipjoints as old as 100 years old are still chugging along just fine. We need to acknowledge that for many many years nobody took their knives apart and that the obsession with disassembly is a modern thing.
My man!
Nothing can convince me that disassembling a knife is for any other reason than because it's possible! If the knife doesn't work the way you feel it should, alert the manufacturer, saying you will try to break it in first, and if that doesn't solve the issue it will go back for warranty service/replacement. I have long felt it is counterproductive to solve issues yourself, and it would be beneficial for everybody if people sent the knife in with a detailed description of the issue! I have high quality angle grinders and other power tools that can be disassembled, but i don't since i have no business doing so, so judging a tool by the disassemblybility is well.. IMO a poor argument.
This knife below is from the late 1800's and still "walk and talk" so the way i see it, either knives of old days were better built, OR the 'home mechanics' are blowing hot air :)

Image
"Life is fragile - we should take better care of each other, and ourselves - every day!"
//Eva Mott R.I.P.

Daveho
Member
Posts: 1260
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2018 9:19 pm

Re: Taking apart knives

Postby Daveho » Fri Feb 23, 2018 2:27 am

Larry_Mott wrote:
bearfacedkiller wrote:Disassembling a knife and then returning it is unethical. In this day and age of customer service most people expect a no questions asked return policy and not much else. Sadly that it what good CS has devolved into for many. Unfortunately many feel entitled and will rationalize this behavior. In my opinion it is theft. I am not sure how to address this as the big retailers are going to continue with their no questions asked return policies.

As far as dissassembling goes I do not understand why it is neccesary. I do it and will admit to it but I will never say it is a neccesity. I don't rebuild ratchets, circular saws and other tools I have. I disassemble my knives because I like to tinker. I find it odd when folks say it is unquestionably needed. I field dressed a deer with a Swiss Army Knife over twenty years ago and all it got was a wash in the kitchen sink and it is still working just fine to this day. I also have other pinned slipjoints that I have had for twenty plus years that work great without ever being disassembled. They have seen a lot of use as they were from before I became a knife hoarder. If someone wants to make a case that they should be able to take a knife apart because it is theirs and they want to I can see that but the claim that it is somehow imperative to the longevity and proper functioning of the knife I am not buying it. Many, many old slipjoints as old as 100 years old are still chugging along just fine. We need to acknowledge that for many many years nobody took their knives apart and that the obsession with disassembly is a modern thing.
My man!
Nothing can convince me that disassembling a knife is for any other reason than because it's possible! If the knife doesn't work the way you feel it should, alert the manufacturer, saying you will try to break it in first, and if that doesn't solve the issue it will go back for warranty service/replacement. I have long felt it is counterproductive to solve issues yourself, and it would be beneficial for everybody if people sent the knife in with a detailed description of the issue! I have high quality angle grinders and other power tools that can be disassembled, but i don't since i have no business doing so, so judging a tool by the disassemblybility is well.. IMO a poor argument.
This knife below is from the late 1800's and still "walk and talk" so the way i see it, either knives of old days were better built, OR the 'home mechanics' are blowing hot air :)

Image
I’m betting it’s got a quality flipping action... but it’s not really the same thing is it.


Return to “Spyderco General Discussion”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Alnuggs, Bing [Bot], chops688, Danke, Farmer, Frozenspyder, GarageBoy, Majestic-12 [Bot], Mushroom, Rinzler, SpydieTerp, steelcity16, tbdoc4kids, ugaarguy, Wartstein and 47 guests