Southfork and Sprig in use on a farm

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SouthernCross
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Southfork and Sprig in use on a farm

Postby SouthernCross » Fri Apr 29, 2016 2:17 am

As promised, now it's getting cooler in the Southern Hemisphere, both the Southfork and Sprig has seen use in processing farm animals (cooler weather is better for hanging meat overnight before cutting up the following day).

My Nephew used the Southfork to help shave both pigs whilst I used the Sprig.

After both pigs were shaved, I used the Southfork to skin the lamb.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eQI_NZ0Gvpw

Whilst the Southfork edge was past it's best after the pigs, it kept an edge that was useable enough to finish the lamb.

BTW, while "punching the skin of a carcass" is always quicker, it doesn't provide the opportunity to showcase the skinning ability of a knife :D

regards
Mick

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Re: Southfork and Sprig in use on a farm

Postby Surfingringo » Fri Apr 29, 2016 5:48 am

Nice work Mick. I grew up way out in the country and I remember "hog killin day" well. Thanks for the memories.

Seems the trailing point on the Southfork works well doing the "edge out" cuts around the tops of the hooves. I like trailing points or straight spine knives for their ability to do that very type of cut (cutting through skin from the inside out) in my fish cleaning work. It's a task at which a heavy drop point really just doesn't work. I have never really done any big game or livestock cleaning with my Southfork. It is a bit larger blade than what I've used in the past for that kind of work and I've wondered if it wouldn't be too big for me. Your video makes it look like it was plenty nimble enough though. Thanks for posting!

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Re: Southfork and Sprig in use on a farm

Postby APS » Fri Apr 29, 2016 7:21 am

Thanks for posting that. I always thought pig hair was burned off, do large processing plants also shave with a blade of some kind? BTW, now I'm hungry and have to defrost some lamb stew I've got in my freezer.

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Re: Southfork and Sprig in use on a farm

Postby Surfingringo » Fri Apr 29, 2016 7:51 am

APS wrote:Thanks for posting that. I always thought pig hair was burned off, do large processing plants also shave with a blade of some kind? BTW, now I'm hungry and have to defrost some lamb stew I've got in my freezer.
I'm sure Mick knows way more about it than me but we used to scald em and scrape em.

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Re: Southfork and Sprig in use on a farm

Postby SouthernCross » Fri Apr 29, 2016 4:56 pm

Surfingringo wrote:Nice work Mick. I grew up way out in the country and I remember "hog killin day" well. Thanks for the memories......
Glad you enjoyed it. Whilst I'm sure Phil Wilson designed the Southfork with larger animals in mind, it certainly was comfortable and efficient to use on the lamb. My Nephew loved using it for scrapping the pig. The more nimble Sprig made scraping around the legs, armpits / groin, ears, and other tighter spots easy.

I'll pass on an observation I made later on that evening when I sharpened both knives. Firstly some background info....both knives have had the edge changed to a convex (personal preference) and sharpening involved stropping them on 2 blocks of 4x2 that have 0.148 inch thick leather glued on the top surface. One block had 3200 grit Micromesh wet/dry stretched across the leather and attached at each end (with a staple gun), the other had 4,000 grit Micromesh as the abrasive. Both knives were then stropped across the surface, starting with the 3200 grit block and finishing with the 4000 grit block.

The Southfork took less than 3 minutes to return to shaving sharp and the sprig took a fraction over 1 1/2 minutes.

IMO Spyderco & Phil deserve to be lauded for the design, steel choice and execution of two superb outdoorsman knives.

Regards
Mick

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Re: Southfork and Sprig in use on a farm

Postby SouthernCross » Fri Apr 29, 2016 5:00 pm

APS wrote:..... I always thought pig hair was burned off, do large processing plants also shave with a blade of some kind? BTW, now I'm hungry and have to defrost some lamb stew I've got in my freezer.
I'm not sure how large scale pig processors remove the hair. Scalding and scrapping is how my Pop and Dad showed me how to do it when I was a kid and because it works, I've kept doing it the same way. :)

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Mick

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Surfingringo
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Re: Southfork and Sprig in use on a farm

Postby Surfingringo » Fri Apr 29, 2016 5:03 pm

SouthernCross wrote:.....

IMO Spyderco & Phil deserve to be lauded for the design, steel choice and execution of two superb outdoorsman knives.

Regards
Mick
Couldn't agree more. In addition to all the fish cleaning work I do, mine both get used extensively in the kitchen...more than any of my other kitchen knives (aside from my Spyderco k04 maybe).

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Re: Southfork and Sprig in use on a farm

Postby bearfacedkiller » Sat Apr 30, 2016 12:31 pm

Thanks for sharing. As a hunter it is nice to see some real world use of these blades. I have been loving my sprig.

I would probably just skin the pig. I raise and process chickens and for my own table birds I often just skin them and break the bird down into pieces. I can have a pile of skinless parts in less time than it takes to pluck a bird. I have never processed a pig so I have no idea how. Do you eat the skin? Is that why you shave it? I love chicharones and pork rinds myself. I see the skin left on hams and hocks a lot but not on any other cut so why shave the whole pig. I have processed elk, deer, goats, rabbits, turkeys and chickens but I have never done a pig.
-Darby
sal wrote:Knife afi's are pretty far out, steel junky's more so, but "edge junky's" are just nuts. :p
SpyderEdgeForever wrote: Also, do you think a kangaroo would eat a bowl of spagetti with sauce if someone offered it to them?

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Re: Southfork and Sprig in use on a farm

Postby SouthernCross » Sat Apr 30, 2016 4:41 pm

bearfacedkiller wrote: ...... Do you eat the skin? Is that why you shave it?....
The answer is yes to both.

I also like bird and fish skin so I pluck & scale rather than skin them as well. :)

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Mick

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Re: Southfork and Sprig in use on a farm

Postby Surfingringo » Sat Apr 30, 2016 5:02 pm

bearfacedkiller wrote:Thanks for sharing. As a hunter it is nice to see some real world use of these blades. I have been loving my sprig.

I would probably just skin the pig. I raise and process chickens and for my own table birds I often just skin them and break the bird down into pieces. I can have a pile of skinless parts in less time than it takes to pluck a bird. I have never processed a pig so I have no idea how. Do you eat the skin? Is that why you shave it? I love chicharones and pork rinds myself. I see the skin left on hams and hocks a lot but not on any other cut so why shave the whole pig. I have processed elk, deer, goats, rabbits, turkeys and chickens but I have never done a pig.
One word. CRACKLINS!! ;)

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Re: Southfork and Sprig in use on a farm

Postby HarleyXJGuy » Sat Apr 30, 2016 8:11 pm

I am so hungry right now.....
On my radar: 110V Military, Police 4 and some sweet Rex 45 Military action.

Newest Spydies: S90v Ti Military, Pacific Salt and a special Kiwi.

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Re: Southfork and Sprig in use on a farm

Postby SouthernCross » Mon May 02, 2016 1:44 am

If it helps any, my Wife & Son had BBQ lamb loin chops and my Daughter and I had BBQ pork chops for dinner last night, with BBQ Garlic Onions, Mushrooms, Zucchinis and Capsicum served with a green leaf side salad & Balsamic Vinegar. Those of us who had pork also had Apple sauce instead of mint Mint jelly.

I tell ya, life as an omnivore is tough. :)

Mick


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