Rust on Super Blue?

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dub
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Rust on Super Blue?

Postby dub » Fri Feb 01, 2013 2:55 am

I'm sucker for aging things, like my brass zippo, leather and denim. When I received my Caly 3 Super Blue, I am definitely going to let it patina naturally. I am going to apply Tuf-Glide to the pivot area and part of the tang. I'm concerned about the potential of rust forming though. I've been researching about rust on Super Blue and haven't really found anything (maybe that's the answer to my question :P).

Does patina eventually lead to rust? Is running water and wiping the blade enough after each use? Basically, I want the patina and a great amount of it, but with zero rust. Is that possible?

Thanks guys!

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elena86
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Postby elena86 » Fri Feb 01, 2013 3:50 am

AFAIK patina is Fe3O4 and rust is Fe2O3.

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kbuzbee
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Postby kbuzbee » Fri Feb 01, 2013 6:18 am

You should be fine, Dub. Just don't 'ride 'er hard and put 'er up wet' ;)

SB will begin to patina very quickly, then kinda level off at a light/med grey. If you want the really dark look, you'll probably have to manipulate it.

Unless you're using it for food, I'd put some Tuf-Glide over the blade once you get it where you like it. Just gives you an extra layer of protection.

Ken
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.357 mag
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Postby .357 mag » Fri Feb 01, 2013 9:14 am

Carbon steels need more maintenance than stainless. The trade is its easier to sharpen carbon. I prefer stainless in my pocket. Carbon when hiking and camping.

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Left Hand Path
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Postby Left Hand Path » Fri Feb 01, 2013 9:21 am

While I don't know the chemical formulas, elena is right that patina and rust are chemically different. Patina will not lead to rust, and in fact will protect against rust.

I have used a lot of traditional knives with non-stainless steels, achieving patina with no rust, as you described.
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SolidState
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Postby SolidState » Fri Feb 01, 2013 11:39 am

I've used my superblue blades quite extensively, and a patina is the best way to keep them up in my opinion. Without patina, they require constant vigilance in order to avoid rust - unless you burnish them, and then you only have to be moderately vigilant. With patina, you can oil them normally.
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kbuzbee
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Postby kbuzbee » Fri Feb 01, 2013 1:43 pm

SolidState wrote:I've used my superblue blades quite extensively, and a patina is the best way to keep them up in my opinion. Without patina, they require constant vigilance in order to avoid rust - unless you burnish them, and then you only have to be moderately vigilant. With patina, you can oil them normally.
How would you burnish it?

Inquiring minds ;)

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w3tnz
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Postby w3tnz » Fri Feb 01, 2013 2:29 pm

I had problems with rust and pitting on my 3.5 after I had developed a solid patina on the blade, while it may inhibit rust it most certainly will not be "rust proof". I gave the blade a high polish and keep it well oiled when not in use, rust has never come back and I doubt it ever will. SB is very easy to polish to a mirror, something to consider if you have patina or rust problems as I did.

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kbuzbee
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Postby kbuzbee » Fri Feb 01, 2013 2:59 pm

w3tnz wrote:I gave the blade a high polish
So what did you use to polish it? I used wet/dry sandpaper on mine and I wouldn't call it easy. It took a nice shine, no doubt but it was several hours. I wasn't surprised, this is a good steel, but if there is an "easier" way, I'm open to it.

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w3tnz
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Postby w3tnz » Fri Feb 01, 2013 3:54 pm

I also used wed/dry all the way up to 2000 then buffed with mothers polish, all by hand. It is time consuming but not difficult, when I say easy I was comparing with other steels (s30v etc).

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kbuzbee
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Postby kbuzbee » Fri Feb 01, 2013 4:04 pm

Ah, cool, got it. Thanks!

Ken
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connor
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Postby connor » Fri Feb 01, 2013 5:39 pm

elena86 wrote:AFAIK patina is Fe3O4 and rust is Fe2O3.
Rust is a little bit more complex, the formula is:

x Fe(II)O * y Fe(III)2O3 * z H2O

;-)
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buckthorn
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Postby buckthorn » Fri Feb 01, 2013 8:21 pm

And what does a patina do for (to!) the edge?

phaust
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Postby phaust » Fri Feb 01, 2013 10:13 pm

buckthorn wrote:And what does a patina do for (to!) the edge?
You're going to have to sharpen it after doing it.

buckthorn
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Postby buckthorn » Sat Feb 02, 2013 6:29 am

Then, will the edge rust (and deteriorate/dull) if the knife is used to cut something wet or acidic?

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PanChango
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Postby PanChango » Sat Feb 02, 2013 6:33 am

buckthorn wrote:Then, will the edge rust (and deteriorate/dull) if the knife is used to cut something wet or acidic?
It's more of just a discoloration. The nice shiny bevel only lasts until you use it.

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Postby buckthorn » Sat Feb 02, 2013 6:59 am

Is the edge after it's discolored less sharp than it was when it was bright (assuming, for the purpose of discussion, that the cutting that created the discoloration didn't cause dulling).

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ChrisR
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Postby ChrisR » Sat Feb 02, 2013 8:09 am

buckthorn wrote:Is the edge after it's discolored less sharp than it was when it was bright (assuming, for the purpose of discussion, that the cutting that created the discoloration didn't cause dulling).
I'd have thought that, as long as it isn't an actual rust-spot, that any oxidation would be a microscopic layer over the steel's edge. In that case it might make the cutting edge minutely rougher and might actually make it cut better ... more saw-like? Just a thought.

I prefer polished knives so I think I'd be going for a burnished look if I had some super-blue. Would be nice to have a UKPK FRN in super-blue ... just sayin' ;)
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SolidState
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Postby SolidState » Sat Feb 02, 2013 2:25 pm

Hi Ken,

You would have to get a burnishing rod or burnishing tool that's harder than superblue. You can generally even use the rounded-off back end of a boride drill bit to burnish steels. Burnishing is generally how you shine the fullers on japanese styled large blades.
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D1omedes
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Postby D1omedes » Sat Feb 02, 2013 2:29 pm

Patina will form on your Super Blue steel as you use it. My only gripe was that after moving to Houston, my Caly 3.5 SB began to have very slight pitting. Again, it was not red rust but it made me concerned. I decided that I did not want to have to worry about maintaining my EDC knife (Houston summers are incredibly humid) so I sold my SB and got a Caly 3.5 in VG10.

If you don't live in an area with high humidity and near salt water, I would say to go get the Caly 3.5 in SB. The steel is so cool. It patina's very nicely, great hues of blue, and it sharpens up like a dream. With very little effort, you can get an incredibly sharp edge.


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