FRN Dyad giveaway

Discuss Spyderco's products and history.
User avatar
dbcad
Member
Posts: 3111
Joined: Fri Jan 08, 2010 3:59 pm
Location: ga, usa

FRN Dyad giveaway

Postby dbcad » Tue Dec 25, 2012 2:30 pm

My making this post in the middle of Christmas greetings was not in very good taste :o Apologies :o

The giveaway is still on :) I'm in the process of a bit of lightening and would like to see this unique little Dyad go to someone who will appreciate and enjoy it. The Air and D'Fly SE Salt have for me made the Dyad superfluous.

To be eligible you need only to name 6 different blade materials Spyderco is currently producing and give a brief description of each. The variety of materials Spyderco uses for it's blades on a continuous basis is delightful and I always appreciate other's insights and opinions of them.

Sorry for my blunder earlier :o I can only hope now that folks will enjoy thinking about the materials and how they help make Spyderco so unique :)
Attachments
dyad 002.jpg
Charlie

" Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not one bit simpler."

[CENTER]"Integrity is being good even if no one is watching"[/CENTER]

BadFish
Member
Posts: 488
Joined: Sat Sep 03, 2011 1:20 am

Postby BadFish » Tue Dec 25, 2012 3:05 pm

H1 - I use this steel when I'm fishing or on the boats. The steel is rust proof and serrations just eat everything!

Vg10 - this is a steel I have in a few knives. It's a staple in the line up great all around with edge retention and corrosion resistance.

Zdp189 - this for me was entry into "supersteels". I have a ladybug and this steel stays wicked sharp for quite a while. This steel takes a bit more to sharpen from dull, try to touch up often.

Super blue - this is a super steel says so in the name lol. This is a Japanese steel it is not resistant to corrosion but does develop a wonderful patina. This steel is super sharp and long lasting

8cr13mov - this is the entry level knife steel. Edge retain meant is okay needs frequent sharpening. Sharpens up pretty fast to hair popping. Pretty resistant to corrosion all around great for price.

154cm - not to much known about this steel. From what I read its pretty awesome. Retains an edge for a while stain resistant and easy to sharpen what could be better?

User avatar
Minibear453
Member
Posts: 822
Joined: Wed Jul 13, 2011 3:36 am

Postby Minibear453 » Tue Dec 25, 2012 3:58 pm

VG10- My favorite steel. Can take a very sharp edge due to the finer grains caused by its Vanadium content, and is very corrosion resistant.
S30V- Similar to VG10, holds an edge longer, but loses the initial super sharp edge quickly, does not get as sharp, and is a little less resistant than VG10.
D2- A tough and wear resistant steel. It is almost considered stainless, at around 12% chromium, but does not qualify. Holds a working edge for a long time, but harder to get as sharp. However, CPM D2 has even smaller grains, and will take a finer edge than D2.

440C- A very corrosion resistant steel, used in dive knives, along with H1 and titanium. Holds a decent edge, although not as long as the super steels. It can take a pretty fine edge.
Aus-8- Not used anymore, but it used to be quite prevalent in Spyderco knives, such as the older Delicas and Enduras, and most of the FRN models. Similar to 440C, although it won't hold an edge for as long, nor as corrosion resistant. Most prevalent in Cold Steel knives today, for its toughness and cheap price.
S90V- Similar to S30V, but it is more brittle, and holds an edge much longer. Edge holding is comparable with ZDP-189, and even a little bit higher.
Carry a sharp knife, and life will never be dull

User avatar
phillipsted
Member
Posts: 3674
Joined: Tue Oct 05, 2010 11:30 am
Location: North Virginia

Postby phillipsted » Tue Dec 25, 2012 5:15 pm

VG-10 - probably my favorite "regular" steel. Takes a great edge, holds it reasonably well, and is easy to resharpen. Very forgiving.

M4 - my favorite of all the "super steels". This steel can take a beating and keep a screaming edge for a long time.

ZDP-189 - Very hard steel that keeps a keen edge for a long time. Tends to micro-chip instead of deforming. Keep it touched up - it takes a while to reprofile!

AUS-8 - Used on a huge number of Spydies from the "classic age". Takes a good edge, can be polished well, but doesn't hold a keen edge for long.

440C - The standard-bearer for high-end cutlery steel for many years. Strikes a great compromise among edge retention, ease of sharpening, toughness, and stain resistance.

N690Co - My only experience with this has been the Squeak. So far, so good. Easy to sharpen.

CPM-S35VN - Designed by Carpenter in coordination with Chris Reeve (among others). All the benefits of S30v but supposedly easier to machine. The jury is still out on this one. So far, I don't like it any more or less than S30v - which isn't saying much. I'm not a big fan of S30v...

Merry Christmas, everyone!
TedP

BigBill5953
Member
Posts: 393
Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2012 11:51 pm
Location: Georgia, USA

Postby BigBill5953 » Tue Dec 25, 2012 6:42 pm

Great giveaway Charlie! I won't enter cause I won your giveaway back in October but very good idea!
-Billy

Centofante 3|Brown FFG Delica 4|Persistence|Sharpmaker & UF rods|SS Kiwi|Manbug SE|Blue UKPK SE Leaf|Calypso Jr. FRN|Blue Dodo SE|Centofante 3|Grasshopper|Tan Ladybug Salt|Rookie Sprint|

bammann45 wrote:In Los Angeles we have roaming packs of carnivorous tortoises. I am glad we finally have a folder that can punch through their shells.

Bill1170
Member
Posts: 2214
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2009 7:34 pm
Location: San Diego North County

Postby Bill1170 » Tue Dec 25, 2012 7:03 pm

VG-10. This is such a balanced steel that it is a shame it is only available on Japan-made Spydercos. Known for its tendency to roll rather than chipping under abuse, it offers ease of maintenance along with high performance.

ZDP-189. Another great Japanese steel, this PM (powder metallurgy) steel excels at a polished edge and supports more acute bevels than most steels today.


H-1. A third great Japanese steel. How can that small nation develop so many great cutlery steels? Totally rustproof, it remains ductile at high hardness and hardens through cold work rather than by heat treatment. This is the bomb for serrated edges.


S30V. Finally an American steel! One of the few steels expressly developed for cutlery, S30V shows a good balance between strength, corrosion resistance, and wear resistance. Hardened to Rc 59-60, it is a good all around performer.

CPM-M4. Not a stainless steel, this PM steel from Crucible is a favorite of performance minded enthusiasts and BladeSports competition cutters. It combines high edge stability with good wear resistance and can attain an extremely sharp edge.


M390. This European steel was developed for building abrasion resistant dies for injection molding of short fiber reinforced thermoplastics. A third generation PM steel, it is very clean. It takes a fine edge which holds up to abrasive cutting better than most stainless cutlery steels while sporting good corrosion resistance. Carpenter makes a very similar alloy here in the USA, CTS-204P, reputed to possess very similar characteristics.

Bill1170
Member
Posts: 2214
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2009 7:34 pm
Location: San Diego North County

Postby Bill1170 » Tue Dec 25, 2012 7:07 pm

phillipsted wrote:VG-10 - probably my favorite "regular" steel. Takes a great edge, holds it reasonably well, and is easy to resharpen. Very forgiving.

M4 - my favorite of all the "super steels". This steel can take a beating and keep a screaming edge for a long time.

ZDP-189 - Very hard steel that keeps a keen edge for a long time. Tends to micro-chip instead of deforming. Keep it touched up - it takes a while to reprofile!

AUS-8 - Used on a huge number of Spydies from the "classic age". Takes a good edge, can be polished well, but doesn't hold a keen edge for long.

440C - The standard-bearer for high-end cutlery steel for many years. Strikes a great compromise among edge retention, ease of sharpening, toughness, and stain resistance.

N690Co - My only experience with this has been the Squeak. So far, so good. Easy to sharpen.

CPM-S35VN - Designed by Carpenter in coordination with Chris Reeve (among others). All the benefits of S30v but supposedly easier to machine. The jury is still out on this one. So far, I don't like it any more or less than S30v - which isn't saying much. I'm not a big fan of S30v...

Merry Christmas, everyone!
TedP
Crucible, not Carpenter, developed/makes S35VN

User avatar
gbelleh
Member
Posts: 4824
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 10:16 pm
Location: Kansas

Postby gbelleh » Tue Dec 25, 2012 9:13 pm

I don't get much opportunity to hard-use my knives, so I probably don't notice as much difference between steels as some here. I'm not very good at sharpening, and I don't know a lot of technical details either. But, I do enjoy using the many different steels Spyderco incorporates, so here is my limited experience with a few.

My most used steels are:

S30V - I find this to be a great EDC steel. Even I can keep it reasonably sharp, and with the tasks I do, it holds its edge nicely. I frequently carry and use my Sage 4, Para 2, and Chaparral with S30V.

S35VN - This steel is similar to S30V in its characteristics, but it seems to me to have even a bit more bite to its edge than S30V. I've enjoyed using S35VN in the Native 5 and the brown Para 2.

VG-10 - I've probably carried more VG-10 knives than any other. I usually find it easy to keep sharp, and a good performer. So many great knives come in VG-10, some of my most used are the Persian series, Delica, and Centofante Memory.

CTS-XHP - This steel seems to hold its edge very well for me. I have yet to sharpen my Techno, and it's been doing a great job slicing up boxes this week. My Para 2 in XHP also sees quite a lot of pocket time.

S90V - My all time favorite Spyderco is probably the S90V Para 2. I haven't had too much difficulty keeping this one sharp on the Sharpmaker, and I've done a lot of cutting with it. The edge does seem to last a very long time.

H1 - Being rustproof is great. It's very nice to know you don't have to worry about corrosion. I actually don't carry H1 knives much, but the Warrior is amazing, and I do use my Rock Salt in the yard.

Thanks for the great GAW! I hope everyone is having a happy holiday season!
:D :spyder:

User avatar
defenestrate
Member
Posts: 2469
Joined: Fri Sep 24, 2004 10:33 am
Location: RTP NC area
Contact:

Postby defenestrate » Tue Dec 25, 2012 10:43 pm

Ooh! I'm going to enter this and hope I'm lucky again. That Dyad looks awesome :P

M4 - the steel I am most pleased with as it seems both fairly easy to get a killer edge on but also seems to take some time to dull. A high end carbon (read: not corrosion-proof) steel.
CTS-XHP - a great all-around steel. Supposed to be very much like D2 with more Chromium for better rust resistance. Seems to be like a fairly high end stainless to me.
H1 - the only steel I've ever owned that claims to be rustproof. Work-hardening and the serrated models like my Spyderhawk seem to have excellent edge retention.
ATS-55 - I think this one was partially invented by the Spyderco team - came standard after Gin-1 but before VG-10.
Super Blue - a highly regarded steel for kitchen knives - more susceptible than most other steels to rust but seems to be well-loved for its performance and sharpenability
CPM-3V - a shock-resistant steel renowned for its ability to take hard severe stresses. Other highly shock-resistant steels include S7 which seems to be preferred in jackhammer tips, if that gives you an idea of its applications. used in the Tuff and widely renowned for taking an incredible and long-lasting edge. Jerry Hossom says it will not polish.
I drink, and I cut things.
-er, me, by way of Tyrion Lannister

Invective
Member
Posts: 1124
Joined: Sun Jul 08, 2012 1:46 pm

Postby Invective » Wed Dec 26, 2012 1:07 am

Alright this sounds interesting so I'm in, lets hope I can describe six steels lol! Since I haven't too many Spyderco's now, I figure I can list each of my knives in their steel as well.

To start with, I'll go with my favorite and the one I own most knives in, which is VG-10. Japanese steel that is now used in the base model for almost all Spyderco's Japanese knives. It can take a wicked edge and depending on it's use, go for miles between sharpening. It is pretty stainless as well, I haven't been able to get mine to stain or rust. Apparently some people have though. Currently, I have a Jester G-10 Sprint, Captain, and Endura, as well as a Spyderhawk and MeerKat Burgundy Sprint, but both of these are being held for a trade so I don't use them.

Next up, I have two knives in CPM S30V, which is a particle made steel by Crucible. Used in a lot of Golden Spyderco's and is a great steel. For me, it doesn't sharpen up as easily as VG-10 but I can get it sharper. Haven't been able to get it to chip yet, which is a common complaint of it apparently. I currently have a Yojimbo2 and Terzuola Slipit in CPM S30V and I love them both to death, the Yojimbo2 see's a lot of kitchen time, doing everything from deboning chicken to cutting up broccoli and it keeps coming back for more. It keeps it's edge for a while and is decently easy for me to touch up. Haven't needed to reprofile either of my S30V blades yet.

Next up for me is CTS XHP, which is described as a stainless version of D2, brought to us by Carpenter. As tough as D2 but with the stain-resistance of 440C it can take a screaming edge, although is a bit tougher than VG-10 to touch up (I haven't had to sharpen it much, just light touch ups here and there, although I did sharpen my roommates D2 knife which was a pain lol). I have a Techno in CTS-XHP and it can get hair-splitting with relative ease, considering the width of the blade :P

Up next is Aogami Super Blue, another Japanese steel named for the color of the paper it is wrapped in at Hitachi. It is considered to be a super-steel by many people, including me. Although it isn't stainless, it does form a patina pretty easily which adds individuality to a knife. However, the main aspect of this steel that attracts it to so many people is it's ability to take an edge. My Super Blue Caly 3.5 is easily the sharpest knife I have and has held it's edge extremely well, going through almost what my Yojimbo2 has in the kitchen and still has not needed re-sharpening or even touch ups besides stropping every now and then. Easily my favorite steel.

Next up is 440C, an old classic. Currently in production in only two knives as far as I know, the Cat and Chicago. It is a classic for a simple reason, and that is it is reliable, fairly cheap to produce, easy to sharpen and extremely stainless. It takes a pretty decent edg and holds it for as long as you would expect it to, and is easily sharpened on nothing but a river stone and tree bark, should you find yourself in the brush with naught but your 400C. What is not to love about it? My Cat was one of my first Spyderco's and even now, it still finds its way into my EDC rotation, where it stands among knives such as the Techno, Yojimbo2, SB Caly 3.5, and Terzuola Slipit. Great steel for the price.

Lastly, is CTS B75P. A fairly new steel from Carpenter and brought to Spyderco in the form of the Mule Team, it has excelled. Comparable to BG-42, it takes one of the sharpest edges I have seen and holds it as well as a starving dog to a bone. My Mule came out of the box able to split hairs. After using it extensively in the kitchen, it still has yet to be sharpened by me (I did send it out to someone for scales and I do not know if he did anything to the edge, if he did he did and amazing job) and it is still just as sharp as my Super Blue Caly. In fact, when slicing chicken I do not even need to move the knife, I can just drag the chicken towards the blade and it gets so scared of the edge that it parts itself so as not to be touched by it :P

And as luck would have it, that's the extent of my Spyderco collection, as I have been consolidating my collection as of late. Thanks for the opportunity! And Happy Holidays everyone and best of luck to all!

User avatar
DigitalUrbanCamo
Member
Posts: 91
Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2012 2:39 pm

Postby DigitalUrbanCamo » Wed Dec 26, 2012 2:10 am

H1: Great steel that is rust proof. I often use my spyderco salt while the weather is wet or if I am at the beach. The edge retention is great although it can be a bit diffacult to sharpen when the time comes.

VG10: I have much use with this steel to be honest. I hiked a lot with it and found it to be a great mix of abilities with little compromise at the price range. Easy to sharpen and vary rust resistance. All in all a great all around steal at a low cost.

CTS BD1: This is my new super steel. I find that its make up makes for razor sharp and long lasting performance. It has great rust resistance and sharpening is EZ as pie. I prefer this steel when hiking now and because it performs so well and it's ability to resest rust even in wet and rainy weather I have replaced my hiking folder with a manix 2 translucent blue (getting the black one soon).

8cr13mov: An economy steel found with my tenacious (and family). It is a cheaper steel but it's definitely not bad at all, especially for EDC depending on what you do in your daily life. I found it to be similar to AUS 8. It will rust and doesn't keep an edge as long as some upper end alternatives but it is easy to sharpen.

S30v: Highly touted around the net. I own a sage 4 with this steel and I must say it hold an edge for a VARY long time. Sharping is ok and not really that difficult although thats a compromise because once it's sharp it stays sharp. It is or rather I should say can be a bit expensive but worth it if your looking for a steel you can sharpen once and forget about it for a while. A few strokes on the old strop brings the edge back with little effort.

n69co: Easy to sharpen. Holds an edge for a decent amount of time. I haven't used it in cold or wet weather so I am not sure how it fairs with that but as an edc knife my pingo does the trick. I just got to this steal and only have moderate experience with it but so far so good. I don't often carry my pingo due to the fact of it's none locking blade. That may be why it's taking me a bit longer to get a feel for the steel.


Thanks for the contest bro. Can't wait to see what other people are saying about the steels they picked to talk about.

User avatar
Evil D
Member
Posts: 23051
Joined: Sat Jun 26, 2010 9:48 pm
Location: Northern KY

Postby Evil D » Wed Dec 26, 2012 11:23 am

First off thanks for the chance to win a knife :D

As for the steels, here goes:

S30V:
This to me is my "standard steel". I've learned to love it over the years since it's the standard Golden steel. Initially I had the same feeling like most people that it can be a little difficult to sharpen, but that issue has gone away as my sharpening skill increased. I find that I can get this steel to take a ridiculously acute edge and that it holds a respectable working edge for a good long time without being overly difficult to sharpen. It's also stainless enough for my needs. This is the steel that's found in most of my favorite EDC knives...my Manix 2 and Yojimbo 2 in particular.

VG10:
The standard Seki-Japan steel. I like this steel for the crazy hair whittling edge that it takes, and it takes it with very little effort. It's a tough steel and well suited for EDC as it will roll before it chips which can eliminate excessive sharpening time to fix chipping. I've found it to be very stainless. It doesn't hold a working edge quite as long as S30V, but it does however seem to hold its initial sharpness longer, and as such IMO it makes for a better light duty EDC steel for those who's cutting needs aren't as demanding. My only gripe with this steel is the grain that can be seen in many knives, which i just don't like the look of. I really enjoy this steel in a thin blade like my Centofante 4...it makes for a great fine cutting slicing steel. It was also the first Spyderco steel I had extensive sharpening experience with, in my 2nd Spyderco knife which was a standard black Delica.

ZDP-189:
The "exotic" Japanese steel. This is a steel that many love to hate for its demanding sharpening requirements. Personally I have this steel to thank for elevating my sharpening skills from a complete rookie to being able to put a respectable edge on a knife. My first taste of this steel was in my CF Caly 3. It literally broke down what I thought I knew about sharpening and made me start over from scratch and rethink all that knew. It was the demanding sharpening requirements that opened my eyes to the mistakes I had been making on other more forgiving steels. Now, I find this steel to be easy to sharpen, although it does take a bit more time to get from A to B. My favorite knife at the moment with this steel is my ZDP Ladybug that lives on my keychain and handles any scalpel type work that needs to be done.

H1:

This steel (technically an alloy) is still on my not so sure about list. I'm a plain edge guy at heart, but this steel seems to shine brightest in SE so i haven't spent as much time with it as I have other steels as a result. This nitrogen-based, work hardened steel is well known for being rust proof. The only way I can bring myself to use this steel is with serrations, and for serrations the only way it makes sense to me is when combined with a hawkbill blade to maximize the bite. For this steel, I have my hawkbill Ladybug Salt.

8Cr13MoV:

The infamous Chinese steel. I must admit, i'm not the biggest fan of this steel. Being the steel snob that I am, it just doesn't perform up to my standards. It does however take a very fine edge very easily, but the edge retention just isn't what I require for my EDC needs. That doesn't make it bad steel per say, it's just not for me, which is a real shame because I would love to try out some of the value line knives someday, and I may still buy a Resilience for kitchen duty someday.

CPM-3V:
This is a steel that I have yet to try, but I'm very anxious to own. Currently available in the TUFF, which is a knife that i've been chopping at the bit to buy, but the recent recall/stop in production has put this knife on hold for me until they decide if there's an issue with the lock or not. Particularly, it's the toughness that intrigues me about this knife. I read an article about this steel a couple years ago, where a knife maker took a piece of 3V and put it in a vice and bent it 90 degrees and back and it would not break.
How you carry yourself is just as important as what you carry.
~David

User avatar
Domanfp
Member
Posts: 583
Joined: Sat Jul 28, 2007 8:42 am
Location: Franklin, TN

Postby Domanfp » Thu Dec 27, 2012 12:13 am

Great giveaway! My opinions on some spyderco blade materials:

1: VG-10 Japanese S30V
2: S30V American VG-10
3: S90V American ZDP-189
4: ZDP-189 Japanese S90V
5: H1 best steel if your in nasty environments
6: Aogami Super Blue Best steel for non nasty environments

Hahaha probably not the most technical reviews but I call em like I see em.
-Frank


Delica and Endura are great knives! They're the low priced crack samples that'll get you hooked on spyderco! Feed the need!
-Michael Cook

User avatar
razorsharp
Member
Posts: 3063
Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2011 9:41 pm
Location: New Zealand

Postby razorsharp » Thu Dec 27, 2012 4:58 am

Great awesome GAW

My top 6: These are steels "I" have used.

M390 ( CTS204p is similar) - Holds an edge for a long time yet is so easy to sharpen and holds a stable steep edge. Kickass with a 10dps coarse edge btw
Superblue- Also holds an edge a long time, easy to touch up, gets super insane sharp, Love it polished.
S30v- Holds a pretty dang good edge , I have no trouble getting it as sharp as VG10, great working edge
VG10- Takes a dang fine edge too, like the razor edge holding a lot :)
H1- Great when im at the beach, cant wait to get some in SE form.
N690Co- Really nice steel, very similar to VG10

User avatar
Pockets
Member
Posts: 1162
Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2012 5:28 pm
Location: Iron Islands

Postby Pockets » Thu Dec 27, 2012 11:43 am

H1- Rust-proof. It is work-hardened, not heat-treated, and with SE it cuts like a beast.
VG-10- A good all-around steel, good edge holding and corrosion resistance.
440C- Another general use steel, significantly better for knives than 440A and 440B. It polishes well.
CTS-XHP- Able to take a very fine edge, very corrosion resistant.
ZDP-189- A very hard steel, difficult to sharpen and not stainless, but good edge retention.
CPM-M4- A tool steel, so it is prone to corrosion and patination. It has superb edge retention.

I've only used the first three, but I've read test results and opinions of the others. :o

User avatar
Owl45
Member
Posts: 118
Joined: Sat Apr 10, 2010 7:39 am
Location: Atlanta, Ga

Postby Owl45 » Thu Dec 27, 2012 2:26 pm

  1. CPM-S30V - Used on the Embassy and Citadel. Takes a great edge. Mine came out of the box "scary sharp".
  2. H1- The rust-proof factor grabs a lot of attention. Only have one, but it looks and works great.
  3. ZDP-189 - Makes excellent cutters. All my British Racing Green's have it.
  4. VG-10 - Good basic steel. Hard to find fault with.
  5. 440C - Another basic. Lot of bang for the buck.
  6. 154cm - Always been one of my favorite. Aside from its excellent properties I just like the look of it.

User avatar
dbcad
Member
Posts: 3111
Joined: Fri Jan 08, 2010 3:59 pm
Location: ga, usa

Time for the drawing!!

Postby dbcad » Mon Dec 31, 2012 6:22 am

Thanks to all of the participants :) Interesting reading :)

Here's a link for those who have never noticed in the past, like myself :o

http://www.spyderco.com/edge-u-cation/index.php

Random.org is open on the laptop screen and has just generated a random number from 2-16.

That number iiiiisss,(drum roll)................... 8

gbelleh, you are the proud owner of a slightly used FRN Dyad sprint :D Enjoy your unexpected Christmas present :D I'll hunt up the box and get it ready to send to Kansas. All I need is a shipping address.

Just for giggles ;) Can you folks name the 5 blade materials of the models in the picture?? I'm geussing yes ;)

Thanks to Sal and all of Spyderco for these materials and their unique business philosophy that helps us explore these materials at an affordable price :D :D

Happy New Year all :D
Attachments
12 004.jpg
Charlie

" Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not one bit simpler."

[CENTER]"Integrity is being good even if no one is watching"[/CENTER]

User avatar
sharpguitarist
Member
Posts: 1178
Joined: Sat Mar 13, 2010 11:34 am
Location: east tn.

Postby sharpguitarist » Mon Dec 31, 2012 7:02 am

Hey Gbellah,
Congratulations!
Nice way to end the year.
Enjoy your new toy!
Btw, Charlie, your one of the most generous people on this board. Props!
Later,
Don
Everyone's entitled to their own opinion, even if it is wrong.:rolleyes:

User avatar
kbuzbee
Member
Posts: 4764
Joined: Sun Aug 13, 2006 8:37 am
Location: Mentor, OH

Postby kbuzbee » Mon Dec 31, 2012 7:16 am

dbcad wrote:
To be eligible you need only to name 6 different blade materials Spyderco is currently producing
Great giveaway, but one nit... to my knowledge Spyderco doesn't actually "produce" any blade materials ;) They do use some great ones though.

Congrats Gbelleh, use it in good health.

And Happy New Year to all,

Ken
玉鋼

User avatar
Pockets
Member
Posts: 1162
Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2012 5:28 pm
Location: Iron Islands

Postby Pockets » Mon Dec 31, 2012 10:12 am

Congrats!
As for the five: VG-10, M4, H1, S30V, ZDP-189?


Return to “Spyderco General Discussion”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: BAX229, brancron, dj moonbat, dkelley661, Enactive, Google [Bot], Leksy, Majestic-12 [Bot], PeaceInOurTime, Radetzky, Spydergirl88, wrdwrght, Wright.88 and 45 guests