South Fork!!

Discuss Spyderco's products and history.
agent clark
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South Fork!!

Postby agent clark » Sat Jul 14, 2012 12:15 am

That's right, found a new jewel in the mailbox today!! I have a bunch of Spydercos, fixed and folders, but I'm really excited about this one. Initially I just needed some S90, but as soon as I yanked it out I appreciated the ergos. This is gonna be my go-to camp/hunt/fish knife, super stoked!

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dj moonbat
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Postby dj moonbat » Sat Jul 14, 2012 8:12 am

Without pictures, it never happened.
"If you can't annoy somebody, there's little point in writing." — Kingsley Amis

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DCDesigns
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Postby DCDesigns » Mon Jul 16, 2012 6:07 pm

" agreed! we want proof!

Spydie-50
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Postby Spydie-50 » Tue Jul 17, 2012 11:27 pm

Seems like they're available at CS, Howes and a bunch of other sites. :)

Slash
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Postby Slash » Wed Jul 18, 2012 12:50 am

Great knife, just would prefer it to not have a weak (hole) spot.
Sorry for being honest.

For the tasks at hand it should perform well.

agent clark
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Postby agent clark » Wed Jul 18, 2012 7:57 am

I'll try and get a few up today. The hole serves no purpose, buts its the birthmark. Imagine how goofy it would be calling it a Spyderco and not having a hole?

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DCDesigns
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Postby DCDesigns » Wed Jul 18, 2012 8:14 am

Slash wrote:Great knife, just would prefer it to not have a weak (hole) spot.
Sorry for being honest.

For the tasks at hand it should perform well.
Dont think they spydie hole causes any considerable weaknesses, you still have a good old chunk of very hard steel next to the hole. PLUS, what do you intend to use the southfork for? Batonning? I think not...

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DCDesigns
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Postby DCDesigns » Wed Jul 18, 2012 8:20 am

Looking at a pic of the knife, what are you talking about weakness, that hole is TINY, There are folders that barely leave a quarter inch of thinly ground steel next to the hole, and there has not ever been a problem... You will NEVER use that thing for any purpose that would cause that hole to be a problem. Hell that hole isnt even a problem on Bushcrafts or any of the hard use fixed blade. The 'Fork is for slicing, anything else is missuse if you ask me, but I still think it could handle it with no failres. Your tip would be your weak point, not where the hole is.

agent clark
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Postby agent clark » Wed Jul 18, 2012 1:52 pm

Here's a few pics...

Spook410
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Postby Spook410 » Wed Jul 18, 2012 9:24 pm

Slash wrote:Great knife, just would prefer it to not have a weak (hole) spot.
Sorry for being honest.

For the tasks at hand it should perform well.
Yea.. well this very expensive piece of S90V was, after all, designed to be a crowbar. (we need a forehead slap icon..)

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AKWolf
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Postby AKWolf » Thu Jul 19, 2012 12:22 am

It's a sweet knife , only wish it had a bit more traction when gripping .
9 er's.....

Latest :spyder:s...C173G, SC90FPGYE, C81GPGR2...

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Roan
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Postby Roan » Thu Jul 19, 2012 4:14 am

Just received word that mine is in the country and on it's way to my door.
I've had it on pre-order since January, probably my most long awaited knife so far.

As others have stated.. the spyder hole is a sign of quality not weakness... what were you thinking to open that can of worms Slash?
Aussie Knife nut.
Incoming: Southfork
Latest arrivals: CF M390 Millie, Elmax Mule, Fallkniven S1
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Aotea
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Postby Aotea » Mon Jul 23, 2012 4:33 am

Just given the southfork a workout on a feral pig. The out of the box edge cut impressively with a slight raspy feel to it. Anything other than bone that the sharpened edge touched just parted. Skinned, gutted, boned and bagged up the pig with the blade still able to shave arm hair on completion.
The handle became wet and greasy as handles do but this facilitated hand to handle position changes with the prominent guard acting as a land mark and a secure safety feature.
The lightness and feel of this knife in hand I like. It seems to me there is enough belly on it to be an effective skinner while still being an effective boning blade.
I drop bone and bag pigs and cattle regularly, have a selection fine and not so fine blades and at this stage the southfork is my first choice blade for this work. But I wouldn't use it for fish filleting as I feel it is too short rigid and broad.
I'm looking forward to processing my next beef.

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Ankerson
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Postby Ankerson » Mon Jul 23, 2012 7:01 am

Aotea wrote:Just given the southfork a workout on a feral pig. The out of the box edge cut impressively with a slight raspy feel to it. Anything other than bone that the sharpened edge touched just parted. Skinned, gutted, boned and bagged up the pig with the blade still able to shave arm hair on completion.
The handle became wet and greasy as handles do but this facilitated hand to handle position changes with the prominent guard acting as a land mark and a secure safety feature.
The lightness and feel of this knife in hand I like. It seems to me there is enough belly on it to be an effective skinner while still being an effective boning blade.
I drop bone and bag pigs and cattle regularly, have a selection fine and not so fine blades and at this stage the southfork is my first choice blade for this work. But I wouldn't use it for fish filleting as I feel it is too short rigid and broad.
I'm looking forward to processing my next beef.
Excellent. :)

So it sounds like the modification of the Trailing point is working well, added more belly for those said tasks.

You can see the difference here.

Image

Slash
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Postby Slash » Mon Jul 23, 2012 10:01 am

Aotea wrote:Just given the southfork a workout on a feral pig. The out of the box edge cut impressively with a slight raspy feel to it. Anything other than bone that the sharpened edge touched just parted. Skinned, gutted, boned and bagged up the pig with the blade still able to shave arm hair on completion.
The handle became wet and greasy as handles do but this facilitated hand to handle position changes with the prominent guard acting as a land mark and a secure safety feature.
The lightness and feel of this knife in hand I like. It seems to me there is enough belly on it to be an effective skinner while still being an effective boning blade.
I drop bone and bag pigs and cattle regularly, have a selection fine and not so fine blades and at this stage the southfork is my first choice blade for this work. But I wouldn't use it for fish filleting as I feel it is too short rigid and broad.
I'm looking forward to processing my next beef.
sounds pretty messy. any chance on throwing up some pics for all to enjoy?

Phil Wilson
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Postby Phil Wilson » Mon Jul 23, 2012 6:49 pm

Agent Clark, thanks for the report. A pig is a good test. Abrasive bristles and usally some embedded dirt. Will look for more in the future. Phil

Phil Wilson
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Postby Phil Wilson » Mon Jul 23, 2012 6:56 pm

OOps report was from Aotea, my mistake, Yes the South Fork is not a true fillet knife but I have used it to fillet a large halibut. Just cut down the lateral line and work to the outside edge top and bottom and remove the fillets from both sides. Phil

Aotea
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Postby Aotea » Mon Jul 23, 2012 8:11 pm

Phil Wilson - Thank you for your response and a much greater thank you for this knife. To me it does look good, feel good, and it has worked well. Will be a couple of months yet before I drop the 3 year old bull. I'll use the South Fork throughout processing and report my thoughts.

Slash - Yep - a little messy : mud, blood, fat and blade. I'll try posting a few photos this evening but I'm new at this forum business and at present I can skin a pig quicker and get a better result than I can post a photo on the forum. Witness my calender attempt. I expect I'll improve.

Ankerson - Thank you for your comment above and also for your efforts, observations and postings regarding the South Fork's qualities and capabilities.

Aotea
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South Fork meets bush pig.

Postby Aotea » Mon Jul 23, 2012 11:21 pm

Some photos of my South Forks first outing.
Hope I'm allowed to do this Slash.

Warning some blood visible

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Aotea
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Postby Aotea » Tue Jul 24, 2012 12:00 am

Yes the South Fork is not a true fillet knife but I have used it to fillet a large halibut. Just cut down the lateral line and work to the outside edge top and bottom and remove the fillets from both sides. Phil
Agreed Phil. Of course a tidy fillet can easily be removed with the South Fork. Would need to be attentive as that keen edge could slice through unintended fine bones with little indication.
A month or so ago I saw a video clip where you briefly demonstrated your "flay knife ?". Long slender blade that when you applied lateral pressure the distal third bowed markedly flowing into the middle third that bowed less so with the handle third remaining pretty much straight. I have seen nothing like that. There, I thought, is the dream filleting knife.


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