Patina Toxic?

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wec12
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Patina Toxic?

Postby wec12 » Fri Aug 19, 2011 8:00 pm

I was wondering if patina formed on CPM-M4 (Gayle Bradly) is toxic. Would there be any ill effect on health (adult and especially new born)? Yeah, I do have H-1 for kitchen cutting. Just wondering.

Thanks for the help. :cool:
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Postby dman62 » Fri Aug 19, 2011 9:56 pm

Nope. Keep it clean and you're good to go.

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The Deacon
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Postby The Deacon » Sat Aug 20, 2011 4:04 am

Why would it be any more dangerous than the patina that has been cultivated on well cared for carbon steel kitchen knives for centuries as a rust preventative? From what I understand, it's an oxide of iron, just not the one we're most use to seeing. It might even have health benefits, in the unlikely event any of it transferred to your food.
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Redeye
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Postby Redeye » Sat Aug 20, 2011 4:15 am

People have been 'eating patina' for thousands of years! Stainless steel has only been used for cutlery since the beginning of the 20th century, and everybody was using patinated knives before that. You and your family will be fine :)

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unit
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Postby unit » Sat Aug 20, 2011 6:13 am

It depends on the entry vector ;)
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Donut
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Postby Donut » Sat Aug 20, 2011 6:23 am

Now... I've seen a gun "blued" patina and I would assume that is not safe to eat off of. Does it depend on what you use to patina the blade?

Most of the time for patina I see vinegar and mustard, which are safe to eat.
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Postby jackknifeh » Sat Aug 20, 2011 6:24 am

Redeye wrote:People have been 'eating patina' for thousands of years! Stainless steel has only been used for cutlery since the beginning of the 20th century, and everybody was using patinated knives before that. You and your family will be fine :)
Wow, those are some pretty old people. Maybe patina extends life but I'm pretty sure if I used a blade with patina to prepare food with I wouldn't last much longer than 250 years. :D

Actually, I never thought of that. Patina is a form of corrosion though, isn't it?

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Postby justinl » Sat Aug 20, 2011 2:03 pm

even rust isn't toxic itself. rusty metal is just naturally associated with unkempt dirty blades. It's the "dirty" part that has the potential to transfer organic pathogens like tetanus and Lordy knows what else.

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Postby jackknifeh » Sat Aug 20, 2011 3:44 pm

justinl wrote:even rust isn't toxic itself. rusty metal is just naturally associated with unkempt dirty blades. It's the "dirty" part that has the potential to transfer organic pathogens like tetanus and Lordy knows what else.
I believe that because when my son was little he stepped on a rusty nail. I took him to the ER and the doctor was more concerned because he was wearing old sneakers and socks than he was about the rusty nail. More bacteria to worry about is in shoes and socks he said than on a rusty nail.

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Postby log man » Sat Aug 20, 2011 4:51 pm

Coming from the hand gun 1911 world and doing my own hot tank bluing, (black oxide) I can say it is the same as the steel itself, as that process is a conversion of the surface steel and not a coating. However cold bluing is a precipitate film and would be much more questionable.

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