Knife Safety to 12yr olds: HELP?

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vampyrewolf
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Knife Safety to 12yr olds: HELP?

Postby vampyrewolf » Mon Mar 11, 2002 1:00 am

On wednesday, march 13, I teach a lesson on knife safety to about 20-25 first yrs(12-14yr olds) at Cadets(for survival in may).



I even had to pester my friends and borrow a DULL knife for the lesson, but I an still taking both my Calypso and Dragonfly.



I'm making use of a friend at cadets to help supervise them. he will be supservising the group with the dull knife.



Other than remembering to take a fully loaded first-aid kit for them, are there any tips you think I should give to them? ASAP as I teach in 2 days...



}{ We all start with 10 fingers. Those with Spydies have 9 to spare, Still need a thumb. Good thing I still have 8 to spare... }{

Arachnid
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Postby Arachnid » Tue Mar 12, 2002 12:55 am

May have to elaborate on what type of info. or advice to give these youngsters. What type of use are you educating them on? Everyday use? Defense? Get back to us. But, first and foremost, the knife is a tool, NOT a weapon. Can't stress that enough. Important they know that. No matter the use of the knife.

sam the man..
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Postby sam the man.. » Tue Mar 12, 2002 5:00 am

Ummmm... Be very patient with minors. They get very excited easily. Suggest a drone or trainer when you do live demonstrations or let them handle it. I agree with lizard : a knife is a tool.. <img src="spyder.gif" width=15 height=15 align=middle border=0><img src="wink.gif" width=15 height=15 align=middle border=0><img src="spyder.gif" width=15 height=15 align=middle border=0> Always place safety in top priority when dealing with those who have not handled knives. A bad experience can be daunting.. <img src="spyder.gif" width=15 height=15 align=middle border=0><img src="sad.gif" width=15 height=15 align=middle border=0><img src="spyder.gif" width=15 height=15 align=middle border=0>

Sam

have surgical scars will travel..

kraziekurtis
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Postby kraziekurtis » Tue Mar 12, 2002 8:31 am

Show them how to hold it properly, and to close it properly...that's all I can think of <img src="smile.gif" width=15 height=15 align=middle border=0>

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Postby Sword and Shield » Tue Mar 12, 2002 12:38 pm

VW- First of all, see if you can procure some of the BSA's books on knife safety, especially the standard Handbook. A lot of useful points are made in those. They definitely helped me when I taught knife & axe!

If you can't, I can help. First of all, you must teach them to respect what a sharp knife can do. How you do that is up to you, I've found that a simple reminder that knives cut steak, and humans are just steaks usually suffices.

The knife is a truly brainless and obedient object. It will cut anything and everything you place in front of it.

Make doubly sure to reinforce that a sharp knife is safer than a dull one. Ask some of the students who shave which they prefer, a dull razor or a sharp one.

Lastly, to reinforce what Arachnid said, and elaborate: A knife is a tool, not a weapon. Using the knife as a weapon or in any patently unsafe manner will get it confiscated. I've seen a few nice blades tossed in lakes over the years, and it makes a great impression.

Take from that what you will. If there's anything else, feel free to ask.

Keepin' it real...real sharp, that is.

yog
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Postby yog » Tue Mar 12, 2002 1:23 pm

Whatever you do don't tell them NOT to run their thumb over the blade because it is sharp. In my experience that tends to encourage people to do just that <img src="wink.gif" width=15 height=15 align=middle border=0> <img src="smile.gif" width=15 height=15 align=middle border=0>

Seriously tho, I would draw comparrisons with other dangerous tools, i.e. power tools. Explain that even though it doesn't have fast moving parts or have a load motor noise it is no less dangerous because of it, in fact underestimating a knife can be even more dangerous.

I would also show two handed closing, it's safer for people not familiar with knives.

There's a hole in the sky where the rain comes in, it's a very small hole that's why rain's so thin - In memory of the Goons

clipiteer
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Postby clipiteer » Tue Mar 12, 2002 3:40 pm

Do not take any kind of knife with a lock mechanism that is easy to close one handed. (Like a linerlock. It is extremely easy to close for someone who knows how, but people who don't are always telling me they can't figure out how to close it, so they start playing with it and getting careless.) I reccomend lockbacks or slipjoints for beginners.

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vampyrewolf
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Postby vampyrewolf » Tue Mar 12, 2002 5:35 pm

To elaborate...

This is part of the 419 section of the Air Cadet lessons. "Survival".

They will be using any folder in the 3" and under range.

I've grabbed:
1> Friend's DULL backlock
2> Old Beater(picked up for $10, good for about 1 use, then back to the stones... good prybar though)... FRAMELOCK
3> Multi-tool(POS with locking parts)
4> Calypso jr lt(have to show them why not to get thier fingers in the way, paper does that)

This is only a lesson on USER knives, not defense or throwing.

}{ We all start with 10 fingers. Those with Spydies have 9 to spare, Still need a thumb. Good thing I still have 8 to spare... }{

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boxer93
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Postby boxer93 » Tue Mar 12, 2002 7:32 pm

VW,
One thing we always taught the scouts was a 'safety circle'. This is where they hold the closed knife in their hand and at arms length slowly swing the arm around the body. Nobody should be in this circle when the knife is open. It's also the user that is responsible if someone gets in their circle.
We also teach this to the Cub Scout bear rank. 8-9 years old. It worked for me.
Chris

mr. v
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Postby mr. v » Tue Mar 12, 2002 7:39 pm

Hi, Vampyrewolf--

If it's not too late, here's my two cents: I'd suggest starting with and emphasizing very fundamental points. How to open a knife safely; how to hold a knife and cut with it safely; and how to close a knife safely, for examples. I work at Spyderco and I know that even adults who work in knife factories don't necessarily know these things unless/until they're taught.

Hands-on experience w/proper supervision is an ideal way to learn new skills.

Also be sure to demonstrate the attitude you wish to instill--be a good role model. Help them enjoy & maybe we'll have 20+ future Forumites!

Let us know how it goes, eh?
Vince

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Postby gadfly » Tue Mar 12, 2002 9:47 pm

You can't stress safety enough!

1. Teach how to open and close the knife, safely (Don't close the blade on your fingers).
2. Teach how to pass the knife, properly (that is handle first with the edge away from both of you).
3. Teach that the knife is a tool and not a weapon! Blade craft is a very advance subject.
4. Teach how to cut things safely (use your
curled fingers as a guide, with your fingers out of the way).
5. Teach how to store knives, safely (so these tools do not fall into the hands of young children).
6. Teach basic sharpening - as mentioned
earlier a sharp knife is safer than a dull one, as a sharp knife permits a lighter touch.
7. Bring bandages with you just in case, the unthinkable happens, you can deal with it.

One way or the other, you pay for your tools!

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vampyrewolf
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Postby vampyrewolf » Tue Mar 12, 2002 10:08 pm

Thats why i'm taking the old beater. I can use the basic beach stones and only make it sharper. <img src="spyder.gif" width=15 height=15 align=middle border=0> blades only see the ceramics unless they get REALLY dull(will not slice paper easy, straight down the middle).

This is going to be a 35 minute class if we get our full time... probably only have about 20 minutes though.

-quick on clothing (have to anyways)
-passing
-opening and closing(including 3 types of lock)
-safety
-sharpness and sharpening
-"why to have a sharp knife instead of a dull one"
-"why one knife is never enough" aka "would you carve a turkey with a paring knife? or cut your apple with a cleaver?

}{ We all start with 10 fingers. Those with Spydies have 9 to spare, Still need a thumb. Good thing I still have 8 to spare... }{


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