Military

Discuss Spyderco's products and history.
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JBE
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Military

Postby JBE » Mon Feb 25, 2002 1:00 am

A few questions please...



1. What type of material is used in the back spacer?



2. What type of material is the linerlock manufactured from?



3. Why no double liners?



4. Is the 440V on the Military really that hard to sharpen? I was told the Military sharpens fairly easy for a blade made from 440V

aero_student
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Postby aero_student » Mon Feb 25, 2002 9:14 pm

1. PLatic/FRN
2. Steel, better strength to volume ratio than ti.
3. The g10 is strong enough to not need them. It has one half liner to help secure the lock.
4. It is not all that easy to sharpen at 30deg but not it to 40 and it is easilt hair popping sharp.

I have absolute faith in this as far as liner locks go. I think the only way it could break is if the entire thing sheared apart. It is a great heavy duty knife in a slim package.

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Postby Jeff/1911 » Tue Feb 26, 2002 1:30 am

Medic2110,

The stainless steel liner is "nested" or morticed into the G-10 scale on one side. This adds tremendous strength to the liner lock assy', as it essentially has the entire G-10 scale to "back it up". I think that it is a brilliant design.

Have you seen Fred Perrin's review of the Military? It is most confidence inspiring, if a little "out there". Here a link to it:

http://www.geocities.com/Hollywood/Set/ ... ryrev.html

Jeff/1911.

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JBE
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Postby JBE » Tue Feb 26, 2002 2:53 am

Thanks...

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tortoise
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Postby tortoise » Tue Feb 26, 2002 8:19 am

More on the nested liner...

Sal explained it particularly well (surprise!) at the NYC show. Let me try to paraphrase:

When you see other liner locks with those big, heavy, double liners, they give the impression of great strength, mostly due to their heft. Those liners are held in place, in most(every one I've seen)cases, by tiny pins. When closing force is applied to the blades of those knives, it is concentrated on those pins. The heavy steel, etc. becomes a moot issue, because as the closing force tries to rotate the lock out of the scale, the failure point of the lock is being determined by the failure point of those tiny pins. If they go, the lock goes.

With the nested liner, as the name implies, the lock is actually nested into the G-10 of the scale. Ergo, when closing force is applied to the lock, and it wants to rotate out of the scale, all the force is transferred to the scale itself. For this liner to fail (under closing pressure) the lock would have to burst through the side of the G-10. It's a matter of how the forces are dissipated. A suspension bridge can have a longer span than a conventional rigid one, an arch can support more than corbelling, etc.

It's a very elegant solution, and more high-tech, expensive and labor intensive than just pinning a couple of liners into the scales. I love explaining that to people who tell me that Spyderco underengineered the Military, by only giving it one liner. Now you can too.

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Lsaulog
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Postby Lsaulog » Tue Feb 26, 2002 8:38 am

Wow, excellent paraphrase, Tortoise. Thanks for sharing! Now I can clearly explain this to those double-liner fans I know. <img src="wink.gif" width=15 height=15 align=middle border=0>

"A clever Hawk hides his claws. My <img src="http://www.spyderco.com/forum/spyder.gif" border=0>'s only show their clips."

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Postby revolvergeek » Tue Feb 26, 2002 9:53 am

Great information guys, thanks! I just picked up a Military last week and was wondering why it was built the way that it is. Perrin's reveiw is .. uh.. distincitive, but seems right on the money. Great knife; thanks Sal!

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Postby SpyderNut » Tue Feb 26, 2002 10:10 am

Excellent, Tortoise!

This will be great for me to use on my brother who is a BIG fan of double liners. He is always braging on the "quality" of his double-liner Buck knife as opposed to the single-liner on some Spyderco's. This should be interesting!<img src="smile.gif" width=15 height=15 align=middle border=0>

~Spydernut


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