Cleaning bolsters on a 25th Ann. Delica?

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Ritt
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Cleaning bolsters on a 25th Ann. Delica?

Postby Ritt » Thu Apr 06, 2006 5:48 am

I recently got my hands on one of these. It looks like it has literally been sitting in the box its whole life. The bolsters look "dirty", I assume it's some surface oxidation. What's the safest way to shine them up? Can I just use the Nev'R-Dull wadding polish I use on my other stuff? Also, should I tape off or otherwise protect the bone that's in contact with the bolsters? Could the polish mar the finish on the bone? Any information will be much appreciated. :)

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WORKER#9
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Postby WORKER#9 » Thu Apr 06, 2006 9:01 am

Some of the bolsters have a copper Patina, and are copper colored, this may be something you do not want to remove.
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Ted
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Postby Ted » Thu Apr 06, 2006 9:11 am

Try to contact Ed Schempp directly. I saw him cleaning some damascus tiles at the A'Dam with some sort of polish stuff which worked pretty good.

Ritt
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Postby Ritt » Thu Apr 06, 2006 9:13 am

It's nothing like your picture, WORKER#9. They just look dark, dirty, to the point that the finer aspects of the pattern in the damascus is hard to see.

Edit: Thanks Ted, should've thought of that.

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Woody
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Postby Woody » Thu Apr 06, 2006 10:00 am

Hey Ritt... If ya can before and after pictures would be neat if ya can post em...

Tks...
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Postby scolby » Thu Apr 06, 2006 10:15 am

I cleaned mine (before I sold it) with a brass / copper cleaner. Stripped the color patina right off. You may not want to do this.
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greencobra
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Postby greencobra » Thu Apr 06, 2006 10:52 am

Two schools of thought here. I wouldn't touch it but that's me.
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Ritt
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Postby Ritt » Thu Apr 06, 2006 11:02 am

greencobra wrote:I wouldn't touch it but that's me.
I can see that point of view. On the other hand, if you can't clearly see the damascus because it's covered by oxidation, well, what's the point?

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Postby TheKnifeCollector » Thu Apr 06, 2006 11:14 am

Would Flitz hurt it? It works great for removing rust etc.
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Jim Malone
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Postby Jim Malone » Thu Apr 06, 2006 11:39 am

i would stay away from cleaning the damascus until you get advice from Ed. If anything goes wrong you could destroy a mayor part of the atraction and value of your knife.
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Postby Ritt » Thu Apr 06, 2006 11:44 am

I sent Ed a PM, we'll see what the master has to say.

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Postby smcfalls13 » Thu Apr 06, 2006 1:59 pm

Take from this thread:
http://spyderco.com/forums/showthread.p ... t=damascus

A quote directly from the master...
Ed Schempp wrote:Spyderwa is right on. It really depends on the depth of the original etch. If the surface of the steel has good depth of relief then you probably won't rub out the pattern, but you will polish off the oxides on the surface. The dark oxide in the Damascus gives contrast and helps show off the steel. I usually etch very deep and then polish my Damascus, it is a more durable finish, but less contrast. Wiping the blade with a soft cloth and WD 40 will remove excess oxides and is good maintanance for Damascus Steel. If the cloth wides off oxides it will show on the cloth and the maintanance was necessary. This would be my first choice for Swede's problem.
If the pattern goes away or is rubbed out, then you can wipe the blade, when clean and oil free, with diluted 1 to 4 ferric chloride to H2O. Repeat until pattern is restored, this is a slow process. It is very important to neutralize or clean off the ferric and retreat with WD 40 when you are satisfied with the contrast. Ferric chloride is availible at Radio Shack as Printed Circut Board etch. You only need a couple of tablespoons of this mix for this process. Ferric stains stuff yellow-orange, like pants and shirts. Neutralize with baking soda or TSP...Take Care...Ed
He was speaking about Damascus blades in this post, but I assume this technique would work for the bolsters as well.
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Postby Ritt » Thu Apr 06, 2006 2:34 pm

Thanks smcfalls13.

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Senate
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Postby Senate » Thu Apr 06, 2006 2:58 pm

wow I hope it never happens to me, seems quite complicated at best! :o
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smcfalls13
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Postby smcfalls13 » Thu Apr 06, 2006 3:05 pm

Senate wrote:wow I hope it never happens to me, seems quite complicated at best! :o
Nah, it's not too bad. What basically happens is the WD40 cleans the steel of any surface issues, and the acid is essentially bringing the contrast back to it's original state(or better) If I recall correctly, Damascus doesn't get that cool contrast until it's acid etched(not sure if that's the right term or not)

The varying steels in the damascus react differently to the acid, some darkening(or lightening) faster than the others, hence the cool pattern.

I'd still wait to see if Ed Schempp chimes in, just to be 100% sure.
:spyder: Scott :spyder:

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